BRAIN - Autism severity may stem from fear

(Medical Xpress)-Most people know when to be afraid and when it's ok to calm down.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-autism-severity-stem.html

BRAIN - Brain cell transplants in early 2013

As part of the European study TRANSEURO, five patients with Parkinson's disease will undergo brain cell transplants at Skåne University Hospital in Lund, Sweden, in early 2013. These are the first operations of their kind in Europe for over 10 years.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-brain-cell-transplants-early.html

BRAIN - Changes in nerve cells may contribute to the development of mental illness

Reduced production of myelin, a type of protective nerve fiber that is lost in diseases like multiple sclerosis, may also play a role in the development of mental illness, according to researchers at the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The study is published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-nerve-cells-contribute-mental-illness.html

BRAIN - Computer model enables better understanding of what happens during and after stroke

(Medical Xpress)-At the moment that someone is suffering a stroke, the immediate concern is getting them stabilized. Once the initial attack has passed, additional treatment and preventive measures can be implemented. Understanding what's happening during the actual event, and in the subsequent hours and days, will help improve the effectiveness of the post-attack treatment plan, and also help identify methods of neuroprotection-that is, administer treatments to protect against a stroke in advance for potentially at-risk individuals. Computational biology researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a model for predicting what's happening during a stroke, how the process evolves over time, the potential outcomes, and the effects of different treatment options.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-enables.html

BRAIN - Depression a key factor in health of Parkinson's patients: study

(HealthDay)-Depression is the most important determinant of the health status of people with Parkinson's disease, according to early findings from a large study of Parkinson's patients.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-depression-key-factor-health-parkinson.html

BRAIN - Four is the 'magic' number for our mind coping with information

(Medical Xpress)-According to psychological lore, when it comes to items of information the mind can cope with before confusion sets in, the "magic" number is seven.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-magic-mind-coping.html

BRAIN - High altitude climbers at risk for brain bleeds

New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research shows that mountain climbers who experience a certain type of high altitude sickness have traces of bleeding in the brain years after the initial incident, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-high-altitude-climbers-brain.html

BRAIN - Immune cells of the brain renew hopes for curing Alzheimer's disease

A new experimental study carried out in mice shows that microglia, immune cells of the brain, might play a key role in protecting the brain from Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is long believed that toxic sticky protein deposits in the brain called amyloid beta (Aβ) are responsible for loss of memory in AD patients. Earlier studies have shown that microglia can remove Aβ protein from the brain and therefore be vital for successful therapy. Interestingly, the doctoral thesis of Mr Lakshman Kumar Puli, MPharm (Pharmacology), indicates that microglia may play a significant role irrespective of their capacity to remove brain Aβ deposits.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-immune-cells-brain-renew-alzheimer.html

BRAIN - In schizophrenia patients, auditory cues sound bigger problems

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the VA San Diego Healthcare System have found that deficiencies in the neural processing of simple auditory tones can evolve into a cascade of dysfunctional information processing across wide swaths of the brain in patients with schizophrenia.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-schizophrenia-patients-auditory-cues-bigger.html

BRAIN - Mediation with art therapy can change your brain and lower anxiety

Cancer and stress go hand-in-hand, and high stress levels can lead to poorer health outcomes in cancer patients. The Jefferson-Myrna Brind Center of Integrative Medicine combined creative art therapy with a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program for women with breast cancer and showed changes in brain activity associated with lower stress and anxiety after the eight-week program. Their new study appears in the December issue of the journal Stress and Health.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-art-therapy-brain-anxiety.html

BRAIN - Molecular knock-out alleviates Alzheimer's symptoms in mice

Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) have identified an enzyme as a possible target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The protein known as HDAC6 impairs transport processes within the nerve cells. The scientists observed only mild symptoms of the disease in mice if the enzyme was not produced. They propose to block its activity in a targeted fashion to treat the disease. Scientists from the DZNE sites in Göttingen and Bonn, the UMG as well as from the US participated in this basic research project on Alzheimer's disease. The study is published in EMBO Molecular Medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-molecular-knock-out-alleviates-alzheimer-symptoms.html

BRAIN - Promising drug slows down advance of Parkinson's disease and improves symptoms

Treating Parkinson's disease patients with the experimental drug GM1 ganglioside improved symptoms and slowed their progression during a two and a half-year trial, Thomas Jefferson University researchers report in a new study published online November 28 in the Journal of the Neurological Sciences.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-drug-advance-parkinson-disease-symptoms.html

DIABETES - Diabetes leading to blindness in many people

Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults 20 to 74 years old. Dr. Michael Grodin, co-director of retinal services and director of clinical research at Katzen Eye Group, with locations around Baltimore, discusses eye problems and the link to diabetes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-diabetes-people.html

EXERCISE - Even women who exercise sit too much

(HealthDay)-For women who love that great, self-satisfied feeling after a workout, a new study could be a disappointing surprise. Regular exercise, the study found, does not reduce the risk of an otherwise sedentary lifestyle.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-women.html

FOODS - 12 Holiday Cookies Packing a Secret Super Food Punch

Say bah humbug to blasé holiday treats and bake semi-guilt-free cookies imbued with super-food superpowers instead.

http://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/easy-vegetarian-recipes/12-holiday-cookies-secret-super-food-punch/

FOODS - People not hooked on fish could get their omega-3 through dairy, study finds

(Medical Xpress)-Not everyone has a taste for fish, even though it is a natural source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-people-fish-omega-dairy.html

HEART - Loss of gene expression may trigger cardiovascular disease, researchers find

(Medical Xpress)-A Yale-led team of researchers has uncovered a genetic malfunction that may lead to hardening of the arteries and other forms of cardiovascular disease. The study appears in the journal Cell Reports.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-loss-gene-trigger-cardiovascular-disease.html

HEART - Researchers advocate better access to angioplasty treatment

New research from the United Kingdom has found that primary angioplasty does increase the survival rate of heart attack patients. The Imperial College London researchers said recent studies examining the role of specialist heart attack centres generated misleading results, because physicians tend to allocate the best care to high-risk patients. They have discovered that the lack of benefit indicated in clinical records is an outcome of the sickest patients being sent to the specialist centres, effectively skewing the data. The finding was recently presented in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-advocate-access-angioplasty-treatment.html

HEART - Short-term exposure to essential oils lowers blood pressure and heart rate

The scents which permeate our health spas from aromatic essential oils may provide more benefits than just a sense of rest and well-being.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-short-term-exposure-essential-oils-lowers.html

HEART - Treating coronary heart disease in kidney failure patients

Among the two available procedures for opening blocked arteries surrounding the heart, one appears to be safer than the other for dialysis patients, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The findings may help lead to better care for kidney failure patients with coronary heart disease.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-coronary-heart-disease-kidney-failure.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Battling bacteria: Research shows iron's importance in infection, suggests new therapies

(Phys.org)-A Kansas State University research team has resolved a 40-year-old debate on the role of iron acquisition in bacterial invasion of animal tissues.

http://phys.org/news273488492.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - C. diff scientists reveal potential target to fight infections

Researchers at Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have discovered how a common diarrhea-causing bacterium sends the body's natural defenses into overdrive, actually intensifying illness while fighting infection.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-diff-reveal-potential-infections.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Molecular root of 'exhausted' T cells in chronic viral infection

When you get an acute infection, such as influenza, the body generally responds with a coordinated response of immune-cell proliferation and attack that rapidly clears the pathogen. Then, their mission done, the immune system stands down, leaving a population of sentinel memory cells to rapidly redeploy the immune system in the event of reinfection.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-molecular-root-exhausted-cells-chronic.html

NEWS - Breathalyzer for diagnosis of lung diseases, potential for earlier detection

Siemens is researching a method that may make it possible to diagnose tuberculosis or lung cancer at an early stage using breath samples. The process involves an analysis of the molecular structure of the subject's breath. If the person concerned is ill, there is a shift in the relative quantities of molecules contained in his or her breath. As reported in the current issue of Pictures of the Future magazine, preliminary tests using breath samples from cancer and tuberculosis patients have been very promising. Now the process has to be verified using a larger and more diverse group of people.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-breathalyzer-diagnosis-lung-diseases-potential.html

NEWS - Controversial treatment for autism may do more harm than good, researchers find

A controversial treatment for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not only ineffective but may be harmful, according to a study conducted by Baylor University researchers.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-controversial-treatment-autism-good.html

NEWS - Electrically spun fabric offers dual defense against pregnancy, HIV

The only way to protect against HIV and unintended pregnancy today is the condom. It's an effective technology, but not appropriate or popular in all situations.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-electrically-spun-fabric-dual-defense.html

NEWS - Hospital cleaning protocol ineffective against A. baumannii

Current hospital cleaning protocol may be inadequate to rid patient rooms of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii, according to a study in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-hospital-protocol-ineffective-baumannii.html

NEWS - Increasing poverty in older age will lead to adverse health outcomes, researchers warn

Many people will be much poorer than they had expected in their older age and this has profound implications for the health of our ageing population claims an editorial published today in Age & Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-poverty-older-age-adverse-health.html

NEWS - Sneak peek at early course of bladder infection caused by widespread, understudied parasite

Using standard tools of the molecular-biology trade and a new, much-improved animal model of a prevalent but poorly understood tropical parasitic disease called urogenital schistosomiasis, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers were able to obtain "snapshots" of shifting gene activity levels during the early, acute phase of what for most becomes a chronic bladder infection.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-peek-early-bladder-infection-widespread.html

NEWS - Sources of E. coli are not always what they seem

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have identified sources of Escherichia coli bacteria that could help restore the reputation of local livestock. Studies by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist Mark Ibekwe suggest that in some parts of California, pathogens in local waterways are more often carried there via runoff from urban areas, not from animal production facilities.

http://phys.org/news273418176.html

NEWS - US court to decide if human genes can be patented

The Supreme Court announced Friday it will decide whether companies can patent human genes, a decision that could reshape medical research in the United States and the fight against diseases like breast and ovarian cancer.

http://phys.org/news273523412.html

NEWS - WHO: Two more cases of new virus in Jordan (Update)

International health officials have confirmed two more fatal cases of a mysterious respiratory virus in the Middle East.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-cases-virus-jordan.html

NEWS-CANCER - Metabolic protein launches sugar feast that nurtures brain tumors

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have tracked down a cancer-promoting protein's pathway into the cell nucleus and discovered how, once there, it fires up a glucose metabolism pathway on which brain tumors thrive.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-metabolic-protein-sugar-feast-nurtures.html

NEWS-CANCER - Mistletoe as treatment for colon cancer?

(Medical Xpress)-Mistletoe has become an important symbol of Christmas but it also has the potential to play a vital role as an alternative therapy for Australian sufferers of colon cancer.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-mistletoe-treatment-colon-cancer.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Body language, not facial expressions, broadcasts what's happening to us

If you think that you can judge by examining someone's facial expressions if he has just hit the jackpot in the lottery or lost everything in the stock market-think again. Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at New York University and Princeton University have discovered that-despite what leading theoretical models and conventional wisdom might indicate-it just doesn't work that way.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-body-language-facial.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Men and women explore the visual world differently

Everyone knows that men and women tend to hold different views on certain things. However, new research by scientists from the University of Bristol and published in PLoS ONE indicates that this may literally be the case.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-men-women-explore-visual-world.html

PSYCHOLOGY - New study finds what makes a good mentor and mentee

How-to books are full of advice on what makes a good mentor. But what makes a good mentee and what chemistry is needed to make the relationship work?

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-good-mentee.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Take the money: Why we make better financial decisions for strangers than family

(Medical Xpress)-People make more rational economic decisions on behalf of strangers and distant relatives than they do for close family members or themselves, new psychology research has shown.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-money-financial-decisions-strangers-family.html

VITAMINS - Vitamin D tied to women's cognitive performance

Two new studies appearing in the Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences show that vitamin D may be a vital component for the cognitive health of women as they age.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-vitamin-d-tied-women-cognitive.html

HEALTH PORTATION News November 28th

BRAIN - Re-learning words lost to dementia
A simple word-training program has been found to restore key words in people with a type of dementia that attacks language and our memory for words.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-re-learning-words-lost-dementia.html

BRAIN - Research shows brain hub activity different in coma patients
(Medical Xpress)-A team of French and British researchers has found that brain region activity for coma patients is markedly different than for healthy people. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the differences found when comparing fMRI scans of people in a coma with healthy volunteers.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-brain-hub-coma-patients.html

BRAIN - Researchers find reading uses the same brain regions regardless of language
(Medical Xpress)-A team of French and Taiwanese researchers has found evidence to indicate that people use the same regions of the brain when reading, regardless of which language is being read. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they describe how fMRI brain scans made while people were reading revealed that there are very few differences in how the brain works as reading occurs.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-brain-regions-language.html

BRAIN - Treating cocaine dependence: A promising new pharmacotherapy
Medication development efforts for cocaine dependence have yet to result in an FDA approved treatment. The powerful rewarding effects of cocaine, the profound disruptive impact of cocaine dependence on one's lifestyle, and the tendency of cocaine to attract people who make poor life choices and then exacerbate impulsive behavior all make cocaine a vexing clinical condition.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-cocaine-pharmacotherapy.html

BRAIN - Want a healthy brain? Scientists say, go for a run
(Medical Xpress)-Physical exercise is just as important as cognitive exercise when it comes to maintaining a healthy brain, according to a new University of Queensland study released today.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-healthy-brain-scientists.html

BRAIN - Web-based therapies help thousands of stroke survivors
(Medical Xpress)-Thousands of stroke survivors with visual problems could improve their sight from the comfort of their own home using two new web-based therapies.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-web-based-therapies-thousands-survivors.html


DIABETES - Topical simvastatin shown to accelerate wound healing in diabetes
Delayed wound healing is a major complication of diabetes because the physiological changes in tissues and cells impair the wound healing process. This can result in additional disease outcomes such as diabetic foot ulcer, a significant cause of morbidity in the growing population of diabetic patients. A new study has found that topically applied simvastatin accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice, suggesting important implications for humans with diabetes. This study is published in the December issue of The American Journal of Pathology.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-topical-simvastatin-shown-wound-diabetes.html


FOODS - Beware the Scent of Orange When Shopping
Retailers who pipe in a subtle orange aroma may be subliminally coercing you to spend more money.
http://www.treehugger.com/culture/beware-scent-orange-when-shopping.html

FOODS - Colorful fruits, vegetables may be key to cancer-fighting diet
(HealthDay)-Many cancer-fighting fruits and vegetables are at their nutritional peak in the fall, and it's a good time to incorporate them into your diet, a nutritional expert advises.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-fruits-vegetables-key-cancer-fighting-diet.html

FOODS - French down to a glass a day as wine becomes weekend treat
French wine consumption has fallen to a new low with the average adult now consuming the equivalent of barely a glass a day, the latest edition of a major consumption survey has found.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-french-glass-day-wine-weekend.html

FOODS - Most Pork is Contaminated, New Study Shows
The Consumer Reports analysis also shows most of the sickening bacteria samples were resistant to antibiotics.
http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/new-report-finds-most-pork-contaminated.html

FOODS - New technology to revolutionise controlled ripening of fruit
(Phys.org)-Materials scientists from The University of Queensland (UQ) are set to revolutionise the fresh fruit industry with a new technology that converts gases into a powder form.
http://phys.org/news273221468.html

FOODS - Weekday Vegetarian: Polenta Cakes with Tomato, Kale and Olive Caper Sauce
A tangy sauce over crispy polenta cakes makes a perfect appetizer or light dinner.
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/weekday-vegetarian-polenta-cakes-tomato-kale-and-olive-caper-sauce.html


HEART - CT depicts racial differences in coronary artery disease
While obesity is considered a cardiovascular risk factor, a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) showed that African-American patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have much less fat around their hearts compared to Caucasian patients.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-ct-depicts-racial-differences-coronary.html

HEART - Enzyme explains angina in diabetics
(Medical Xpress)-In a new study published in the scientific journal Circulation, scientists at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital show that an enzyme called arginase might have a key part to play in the development of cardiovascular disease in patients who already have type II diabetes. According to the team, arginase prevents the formation of protective nitrogen oxide in the blood vessels, and treatments that inhibit this enzyme reduce the risk of angina in diabetics.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-enzyme-angina-diabetics.html

HEART - Thyroid problems linked to irregular heart rhythm
People with an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) carry a greater risk of developing irregular heart rhythm (known as atrial fibrillation) than those with normal thyroid function, finds a study published on BMJ today.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-thyroid-problems-linked-irregular-heart.html


IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Double duty: Immune system regulator found to protect brain from effects of stroke
A small molecule known to regulate white blood cells has a surprising second role in protecting brain cells from the deleterious effects of stroke, Johns Hopkins researchers report. The molecule, microRNA-223, affects how cells respond to the temporary loss of blood supply brought on by stroke-and thus the cells' likelihood of suffering permanent damage.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-duty-immune-brain-effects.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Study suggests immune system could play a central role in AMD
(Medical Xpress)-Changes in how genes in the immune system function may result in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of visual impairment in older adults, based on preliminary research conducted by National Institutes of Health (NIH) investigators.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-immune-central-role-amd.html


NEWS - Hello Health raises $11.5M to help doctors go paper-free
For all the high-tech equipment doctors use in their practices, when it comes to communicating with patients, far too many physicians are woefully old-school, relying on fax machines and telephones for sharing tests results and releasing medical records.
But New York-based Hello Health is one company trying to change that with an electronic health records (EHR) platform that helps doctors and patients make the shift to digital.
The company on Monday announced that it had raised $11.5 million from First Generation Capital, which follows a $10 million round raised last year.
As more doctors move their patients' health information online - incentivized by the federal government - Hello Health says it offers physicians a platform that is not only free, but helps them earn additional revenue.
Through its Web-based system, physicians can share lab results and other information with patients in a HIPAA-secure environment, as well as enable patients to schedule appointments and upload documents. But instead of charging physicians (like many of its older rivals), Hello Health charges patients a monthly subscription fee of $5. Hello Health takes a percentage of the fee and the physician gets the remainder.
"It's more of a partnership than a simple SaaS model," said Steven Ferguson, vice president of physician marketing for Hello Health.
With the new funding, Ferguson said the company, which is a subsidiary of Quebec-based Myca Health, plans to build out new features, including those to better manage patients' medical charts and streamline referrals.
When it launched in 2008, Hello Health was intended to be more of a consumer-friendly concierge service. (And, interestingly, one of Hello Health's original co-founders, Dr. Jay Parkinson, has gone on to launch Sherpaa, a concierge-like service, paid for by employers, that provides round-the-clock access to doctors.) But later, Hello Health pivoted into its current version.
While Hello Health may offer doctors an interesting business model, it has many competitors in the EHR industry, including public companies Allscripts and Cerner, and rising startup Practice Fusion, which also offers physicians a free option.
Image by RTimages via Shutterstock.




NEWS - Japanese firm develops health monitor for dogs
Worried the family dog is too chubby?
http://phys.org/news273217975.html

NEWS - Natural anesthetic in honeybee bites
(Phys.org)-Honeybees never cease to amaze us... their bite contains a natural anesthetic. This discovery was made by a team of Greek and Cypriot researchers, in collaboration with the CNRS Laboratoire Evolution, Génomes et Spéciation. In a study published in the journal PLoS ONE, the researchers show that bites from domestic honeybees (Apis mellifera) contain a compound, 2-heptanone (2-H), that acts as an efficient natural anesthetic. This finding has been patented, so 2-H can now be commercially produced as a local anesthetic, which offers the additional advantage of low toxicity to humans and animals.
http://phys.org/news273219062.html

NEWS - New method for diagnosing malaria
Danish researchers have developed a new and sensitive method that makes it possible to diagnose malaria from a single drop of blood or saliva. The method might eventually be used in low-resource areas without the need for specially trained personnel, expensive equipment, clean water or electricity. With the development of this method, the researchers hope to go one step further in identifying and treating all patients suffering from malaria.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-method-malaria.html

NEWS - New test to help heavy drinkers reduce alcohol intake
(Medical Xpress)-Researchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a computer-based test that could help heavy drinkers reduce their alcohol consumption.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-heavy-drinkers-alcohol-intake.html

NEWS - Researchers genetically alter wheat to make it nearly free of gluten
(Phys.org)-An international team of researchers has succeeded in genetically altering wheat seeds to prevent the production of gluten in subsequent plants. The effort focused, the team writes in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, on disabling the enzyme responsible for activating genes responsible for the development of gluten protein.
http://phys.org/news273226376.html

NEWS - Researchers show a better way for curbing TB where the disease is rampant
(Medical Xpress)-Those who live and die behind prison walls don't usually get much public attention. Incarceration is, after all, meant to remove criminals from society. But contagious and potentially deadly diseases can't be locked and left in a penitentiary, especially when infected inmates are eventually released.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-curbing-tb-disease-rampant.html

NEWS - The placebo effect goes beyond humans, researchers find
(Medical Xpress)-Rats and humans have at least one thing in common: They both react the same way to a placebo, according to a new University of Florida study.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-placebo-effect-humans.html

NEWS - Thought-controlled prosthesis is changing the lives of amputees
The world's first implantable robotic arm controlled by thoughts is being developed by Chalmers researcher Max Ortiz Catalan. The first operations on patients will take place this winter.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-thought-controlled-prosthesis-amputees.html


NEWS-CANCER - Cell proliferation is a key factor in degenerative diseases and cancers
(Medical Xpress)-A newly-engineered strain of mice whose dividing cells express a fluorescent protein could open the door to new methods of regulating cell proliferation in humans. Cell proliferation plays a key role in degenerative diseases, in which specific cells do not replicate enough, and in cancers, in which cells replicate too much.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-cell-proliferation-key-factor-degenerative.html

NEWS-CANCER - Metabolic protein launches sugar feast that nurtures brain tumors
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have tracked down a cancer-promoting protein's pathway into the cell nucleus and discovered how, once there, it fires up a glucose metabolism pathway on which brain tumors thrive.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-metabolic-protein-sugar-feast-nurtures.html

NEWS-CANCER - New mechanism for cancer progression discovered
The protein Ras plays an important role in cellular growth control. Researchers have focused on the protein because mutations in its gene are found in more than 30 percent of all cancers, making it the most prevalent human oncogene.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-mechanism-cancer.html

NEWS-CANCER - Why data is the key to better medicine - and maybe a cure for cancer
The health care industry might have embraced the big data movement with open arms, but embracing it with open data probably would be more effective. Hospital organizations, researchers and the tech companies serving them have lots of great ideas - and have achieved some great results, too - but, ultimately, efforts to use big data to transform the industry will only be as good as the data these stakeholders have to work with. Right now, that isn't always everything they need.
Have access, will innovate
Wired published an interesting profile Tuesday morning that exemplifies what's possible when smart people have access to good data. The piece showcases the work of a man named Fred Trotter who has accessed reams of buried Medicare data via a Freedom of Information Act request and is uncovering some potentially valuable information. Already, the article explains, he has built a "Doctor Social Graph" by analyzing some "60 million relationships between doctors, and how often they refer patients to one another." His next mission is to build a doctor rating system based on data he's uncovered about credentials, nursing home inspections and other relevant info.
Elsewhere, companies such as Palo Alto, Calif., startup Apixio are trying to make hospitals more efficient by using semantic analysis to connect the dots between patient charts, electronic medical records, billing data and whatever other sources of information that hospitals generate. (We covered Apixio in early 2011, although the company has significantly expanded its services since then.) In health care, everyone seems to have their own way of doing things, as Apixio natural-language-processing scientist Vishnu Vyas told me recently, so "the variety of the data becomes as important as the volume of the data."
Linda Drumright, GM of the Clinical Trial Optimization Solutions group at IMS Health, agreed. She explained that her company is able to do its job because it has access to mountains of data from pharmacies, insurance claims, medical records, partners and other sources. All told, it houses 17 petabytes of data spread across 5,000 databases. Her division's clients, which generally include pharmaceutical and biotech companies running patient trials, need all this data in order to ensure their trials will actually be successful.
One recent customer wasn't able to recruit test subjects fast enough, she noted, and IMS helped it comb through its criteria about who to or not to include in the trial only to find "that the patient population they were looking for didn't exist." As IMS went back and began eliminating criteria and iterating design, it realized that trial never should have begun in the first place.
There are a million ways to think about how to use this data, Drumright said, and as more customers begin to fully understand what they can do with it, her goal is to "make this information accessible in a way where it's easy at the point where it's needed, and consumable where it's needed."
The key to curing cancer might be more data
But whatever Trotter, Apixio, IMS and others accomplish will have been made possible because they have access to some valuable datasets, albeit not always with great ease. Many individuals who'd like to improve the health care system - if not our health, generally - aren't so lucky. Take, for example, the world's genetic researchers. It's very possible the data they need to discover the medical Holy Grail of a cure for cancer is locked in gene sequence data that only very few people will ever see.

David Haussler
According to University of California, Santa Cruz researcher David Haussler, the limited access that many geneticists and computer scientists like himself have to valuable genetic data is "a crime."
"We are on the brink of a real new understanding of cancer by being able to sequence cancer genomes," he told me during a recent interview, but big data will be the key to unlocking it.
There are 1.6 million cases of cancer in the United States every year, Haussler explained, and most of the information from those tumors is being ignored. This is partially because of privacy restrictions about who can access personal medical data and for what purposes, and partially because there isn't yet a concerted effort to collect the necessary genetic samples. As genome sequencing gets faster and cheaper, he says researchers need access to healthy and cancerous samples from the same person - and as many of these samples as possible - in order to analyze the "astounding" number of molecular changes that occur in every type and variation of cancer.
"We can't completely understand what we'll find, but we know we the only way we'll pull out signal from the noise is to [analyze all these genes]," Haussler said.
Haussler understands the need for privacy regulations, but thinks there's an opportunity to at least ease some current restrictions on how researchers access data. Even when there are relatively large (if not ideal) datasets available such as with the Cancer Genome Atlas project, researchers must apply to the National Institutes of Health for access, and the data must always remain behind an organizational firewall. Every cancer patient in the country could agree to having their data available to researchers, he said, but as long as that data isn't accessible over the internet it's only of limited utility.
He - along with others in the field - thinks cloud computing could be the solution because it gives genetic researchers a central location where they can access and perform computations on the data. Haussler and his team that house the Cancer Genome Atlas and a couple other projects currently have more than 400 terabytes of data and expect to have around 5 petabytes of data eventually. Downloading that is infeasible save for access to high-speed research networks, so "we need a place where people can experiment with these big data problems," Haussler said.
In the meantime, Haussler and his peers will keep on collecting and accessing genome data however they can. And they'll keep building software packages and algorithms that analyze that data better and faster than ever before. However, he lamented, "If we had the big data out there in an unrestricted setting, then all the best minds in the world would already be crunching on it."



http://gigaom.com/data/why-data-is-the-key-to-better-medicine-and-maybe-a-cure-for-cancer/


PSYCHOLOGY - Being bullied can cause trauma symptoms
Problems caused by bullying do not necessarily cease when the abuse stops. Recent research shows that victims may need long-term support.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-bullied-trauma-symptoms.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Combatting Attention Distraction Disorder: The Ultimate Tool
Over the last few months I have given myself a self-diagnosis of A.D.D. While I'm not sure that I meet the criteria to make me a hardcore case of Attention Deficit Disorder, I certainly have been struggling with "Attention Distraction Disorder." And the more I've shared my problem with other people - whether friends, clients or c
http://www.forbes.com/sites/margiewarrell/2012/11/28/combatting-attention-distraction-disorder/

PSYCHOLOGY - Tight times may influence how we perceive others
From the playground to the office, a key aspect of our social lives involves figuring out who "belongs" and who doesn't. Our biases lead us-whether we're aware of it or not-to favor people who belong to our own social group. Scientists theorize that these prevalent in-group biases may give us a competitive advantage against others, especially when important resources are limited.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-tight.html


SPIRITUALITY - Mayan Doomsday Forecast: Really ?!
Perhaps you've read the Mayan calendar will end December 21, 2012. Or heard predictions that the end of the Mayan calendar means our world will come to an end on December 21, 2012. Or the slightly sunnier prediction of a cataclysmic shift in world order, whatever that means. Damn. December 21 is my birthday.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnseigenthaler/2012/11/28/mayan-doomsday-forecast-really/


VITAMINS - Analysis of conflicting fish oil studies finds that omega-3 fatty acids still matter
Literally hundreds of clinical trials, including some that have gained widespread attention, have been done on the possible benefits of omega-3 fatty acids for the prevention of heart disease - producing conflicting results, varied claims, and frustrated consumers unsure what to believe.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-analysis-conflicting-fish-oil-omega-.html

VITAMINS - New review associates vitamin D with lower rates of tooth decay
A new review of existing studies points toward a potential role for vitamin D in helping to prevent dental caries, or tooth decay.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-associates-vitamin-d-tooth.html


WEIGHT - New treatment aids weight loss, improves diabetes in monkeys
(HealthDay)-A new, lab-created antibody that mimics the action of a naturally occurring molecule causes weight loss in monkeys, researchers report.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-treatment-aids-weight-loss-diabetes.html


BRAIN - Re-learning words lost to dementia

A simple word-training program has been found to restore key words in people with a type of dementia that attacks language and our memory for words.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-re-learning-words-lost-dementia.html

BRAIN - Research shows brain hub activity different in coma patients

(Medical Xpress)-A team of French and British researchers has found that brain region activity for coma patients is markedly different than for healthy people. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the differences found when comparing fMRI scans of people in a coma with healthy volunteers.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-brain-hub-coma-patients.html

BRAIN - Researchers find reading uses the same brain regions regardless of language

(Medical Xpress)-A team of French and Taiwanese researchers has found evidence to indicate that people use the same regions of the brain when reading, regardless of which language is being read. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they describe how fMRI brain scans made while people were reading revealed that there are very few differences in how the brain works as reading occurs.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-brain-regions-language.html

BRAIN - Treating cocaine dependence: A promising new pharmacotherapy

Medication development efforts for cocaine dependence have yet to result in an FDA approved treatment. The powerful rewarding effects of cocaine, the profound disruptive impact of cocaine dependence on one's lifestyle, and the tendency of cocaine to attract people who make poor life choices and then exacerbate impulsive behavior all make cocaine a vexing clinical condition.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-cocaine-pharmacotherapy.html

BRAIN - Want a healthy brain? Scientists say, go for a run

(Medical Xpress)-Physical exercise is just as important as cognitive exercise when it comes to maintaining a healthy brain, according to a new University of Queensland study released today.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-healthy-brain-scientists.html

BRAIN - Web-based therapies help thousands of stroke survivors

(Medical Xpress)-Thousands of stroke survivors with visual problems could improve their sight from the comfort of their own home using two new web-based therapies.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-web-based-therapies-thousands-survivors.html

DIABETES - Topical simvastatin shown to accelerate wound healing in diabetes

Delayed wound healing is a major complication of diabetes because the physiological changes in tissues and cells impair the wound healing process. This can result in additional disease outcomes such as diabetic foot ulcer, a significant cause of morbidity in the growing population of diabetic patients. A new study has found that topically applied simvastatin accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice, suggesting important implications for humans with diabetes. This study is published in the December issue of The American Journal of Pathology.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-topical-simvastatin-shown-wound-diabetes.html

FOODS - Beware the Scent of Orange When Shopping

Retailers who pipe in a subtle orange aroma may be subliminally coercing you to spend more money.

http://www.treehugger.com/culture/beware-scent-orange-when-shopping.html

FOODS - Colorful fruits, vegetables may be key to cancer-fighting diet

(HealthDay)-Many cancer-fighting fruits and vegetables are at their nutritional peak in the fall, and it's a good time to incorporate them into your diet, a nutritional expert advises.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-fruits-vegetables-key-cancer-fighting-diet.html

FOODS - French down to a glass a day as wine becomes weekend treat

French wine consumption has fallen to a new low with the average adult now consuming the equivalent of barely a glass a day, the latest edition of a major consumption survey has found.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-french-glass-day-wine-weekend.html

FOODS - Most Pork is Contaminated, New Study Shows

The Consumer Reports analysis also shows most of the sickening bacteria samples were resistant to antibiotics.

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/new-report-finds-most-pork-contaminated.html

FOODS - New technology to revolutionise controlled ripening of fruit

(Phys.org)-Materials scientists from The University of Queensland (UQ) are set to revolutionise the fresh fruit industry with a new technology that converts gases into a powder form.

http://phys.org/news273221468.html

FOODS - Weekday Vegetarian: Polenta Cakes with Tomato, Kale and Olive Caper Sauce

A tangy sauce over crispy polenta cakes makes a perfect appetizer or light dinner.

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/weekday-vegetarian-polenta-cakes-tomato-kale-and-olive-caper-sauce.html

HEART - CT depicts racial differences in coronary artery disease

While obesity is considered a cardiovascular risk factor, a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) showed that African-American patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have much less fat around their hearts compared to Caucasian patients.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-ct-depicts-racial-differences-coronary.html

HEART - Enzyme explains angina in diabetics

(Medical Xpress)-In a new study published in the scientific journal Circulation, scientists at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital show that an enzyme called arginase might have a key part to play in the development of cardiovascular disease in patients who already have type II diabetes. According to the team, arginase prevents the formation of protective nitrogen oxide in the blood vessels, and treatments that inhibit this enzyme reduce the risk of angina in diabetics.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-enzyme-angina-diabetics.html

HEART - Thyroid problems linked to irregular heart rhythm

People with an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) carry a greater risk of developing irregular heart rhythm (known as atrial fibrillation) than those with normal thyroid function, finds a study published on BMJ today.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-thyroid-problems-linked-irregular-heart.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Double duty: Immune system regulator found to protect brain from effects of stroke

A small molecule known to regulate white blood cells has a surprising second role in protecting brain cells from the deleterious effects of stroke, Johns Hopkins researchers report. The molecule, microRNA-223, affects how cells respond to the temporary loss of blood supply brought on by stroke-and thus the cells' likelihood of suffering permanent damage.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-duty-immune-brain-effects.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Study suggests immune system could play a central role in AMD

(Medical Xpress)-Changes in how genes in the immune system function may result in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of visual impairment in older adults, based on preliminary research conducted by National Institutes of Health (NIH) investigators.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-immune-central-role-amd.html

NEWS - Hello Health raises $11.5M to help doctors go paper-free

For all the high-tech equipment doctors use in their practices, when it comes to communicating with patients, far too many physicians are woefully old-school, relying on fax machines and telephones for sharing tests results and releasing medical records.

But New York-based Hello Health is one company trying to change that with an electronic health records (EHR) platform that helps doctors and patients make the shift to digital.

The company on Monday announced that it had raised $11.5 million from First Generation Capital, which follows a $10 million round raised last year.

As more doctors move their patients' health information online - incentivized by the federal government - Hello Health says it offers physicians a platform that is not only free, but helps them earn additional revenue.

Through its Web-based system, physicians can share lab results and other information with patients in a HIPAA-secure environment, as well as enable patients to schedule appointments and upload documents. But instead of charging physicians (like many of its older rivals), Hello Health charges patients a monthly subscription fee of $5. Hello Health takes a percentage of the fee and the physician gets the remainder.

"It's more of a partnership than a simple SaaS model," said Steven Ferguson, vice president of physician marketing for Hello Health.

With the new funding, Ferguson said the company, which is a subsidiary of Quebec-based Myca Health, plans to build out new features, including those to better manage patients' medical charts and streamline referrals.

When it launched in 2008, Hello Health was intended to be more of a consumer-friendly concierge service. (And, interestingly, one of Hello Health's original co-founders, Dr. Jay Parkinson, has gone on to launch Sherpaa, a concierge-like service, paid for by employers, that provides round-the-clock access to doctors.) But later, Hello Health pivoted into its current version.

While Hello Health may offer doctors an interesting business model, it has many competitors in the EHR industry, including public companies Allscripts and Cerner, and rising startup Practice Fusion, which also offers physicians a free option.

Image by RTimages via Shutterstock.



http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OmMalik/~3/PwHeVlpeVUQ/story01.htm

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NEWS - Japanese firm develops health monitor for dogs

Worried the family dog is too chubby?

http://phys.org/news273217975.html

NEWS - Natural anesthetic in honeybee bites

(Phys.org)-Honeybees never cease to amaze us... their bite contains a natural anesthetic. This discovery was made by a team of Greek and Cypriot researchers, in collaboration with the CNRS Laboratoire Evolution, Génomes et Spéciation. In a study published in the journal PLoS ONE, the researchers show that bites from domestic honeybees (Apis mellifera) contain a compound, 2-heptanone (2-H), that acts as an efficient natural anesthetic. This finding has been patented, so 2-H can now be commercially produced as a local anesthetic, which offers the additional advantage of low toxicity to humans and animals.

http://phys.org/news273219062.html

NEWS - New method for diagnosing malaria

Danish researchers have developed a new and sensitive method that makes it possible to diagnose malaria from a single drop of blood or saliva. The method might eventually be used in low-resource areas without the need for specially trained personnel, expensive equipment, clean water or electricity. With the development of this method, the researchers hope to go one step further in identifying and treating all patients suffering from malaria.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-method-malaria.html

NEWS - New test to help heavy drinkers reduce alcohol intake

(Medical Xpress)-Researchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a computer-based test that could help heavy drinkers reduce their alcohol consumption.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-heavy-drinkers-alcohol-intake.html

NEWS - Researchers genetically alter wheat to make it nearly free of gluten

(Phys.org)-An international team of researchers has succeeded in genetically altering wheat seeds to prevent the production of gluten in subsequent plants. The effort focused, the team writes in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, on disabling the enzyme responsible for activating genes responsible for the development of gluten protein.

http://phys.org/news273226376.html

NEWS - Researchers show a better way for curbing TB where the disease is rampant

(Medical Xpress)-Those who live and die behind prison walls don't usually get much public attention. Incarceration is, after all, meant to remove criminals from society. But contagious and potentially deadly diseases can't be locked and left in a penitentiary, especially when infected inmates are eventually released.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-curbing-tb-disease-rampant.html

NEWS - The placebo effect goes beyond humans, researchers find

(Medical Xpress)-Rats and humans have at least one thing in common: They both react the same way to a placebo, according to a new University of Florida study.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-placebo-effect-humans.html

NEWS - Thought-controlled prosthesis is changing the lives of amputees

The world's first implantable robotic arm controlled by thoughts is being developed by Chalmers researcher Max Ortiz Catalan. The first operations on patients will take place this winter.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-thought-controlled-prosthesis-amputees.html

NEWS-CANCER - Cell proliferation is a key factor in degenerative diseases and cancers

(Medical Xpress)-A newly-engineered strain of mice whose dividing cells express a fluorescent protein could open the door to new methods of regulating cell proliferation in humans. Cell proliferation plays a key role in degenerative diseases, in which specific cells do not replicate enough, and in cancers, in which cells replicate too much.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-cell-proliferation-key-factor-degenerative.html

NEWS-CANCER - Metabolic protein launches sugar feast that nurtures brain tumors

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have tracked down a cancer-promoting protein's pathway into the cell nucleus and discovered how, once there, it fires up a glucose metabolism pathway on which brain tumors thrive.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-metabolic-protein-sugar-feast-nurtures.html

NEWS-CANCER - New mechanism for cancer progression discovered

The protein Ras plays an important role in cellular growth control. Researchers have focused on the protein because mutations in its gene are found in more than 30 percent of all cancers, making it the most prevalent human oncogene.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-mechanism-cancer.html

NEWS-CANCER - Why data is the key to better medicine - and maybe a cure for cancer

The health care industry might have embraced the big data movement with open arms, but embracing it with open data probably would be more effective. Hospital organizations, researchers and the tech companies serving them have lots of great ideas - and have achieved some great results, too - but, ultimately, efforts to use big data to transform the industry will only be as good as the data these stakeholders have to work with. Right now, that isn't always everything they need.

Have access, will innovate

Wired published an interesting profile Tuesday morning that exemplifies what's possible when smart people have access to good data. The piece showcases the work of a man named Fred Trotter who has accessed reams of buried Medicare data via a Freedom of Information Act request and is uncovering some potentially valuable information. Already, the article explains, he has built a "Doctor Social Graph" by analyzing some "60 million relationships between doctors, and how often they refer patients to one another." His next mission is to build a doctor rating system based on data he's uncovered about credentials, nursing home inspections and other relevant info.

Elsewhere, companies such as Palo Alto, Calif., startup Apixio are trying to make hospitals more efficient by using semantic analysis to connect the dots between patient charts, electronic medical records, billing data and whatever other sources of information that hospitals generate. (We covered Apixio in early 2011, although the company has significantly expanded its services since then.) In health care, everyone seems to have their own way of doing things, as Apixio natural-language-processing scientist Vishnu Vyas told me recently, so "the variety of the data becomes as important as the volume of the data."

Linda Drumright, GM of the Clinical Trial Optimization Solutions group at IMS Health, agreed. She explained that her company is able to do its job because it has access to mountains of data from pharmacies, insurance claims, medical records, partners and other sources. All told, it houses 17 petabytes of data spread across 5,000 databases. Her division's clients, which generally include pharmaceutical and biotech companies running patient trials, need all this data in order to ensure their trials will actually be successful.

One recent customer wasn't able to recruit test subjects fast enough, she noted, and IMS helped it comb through its criteria about who to or not to include in the trial only to find "that the patient population they were looking for didn't exist." As IMS went back and began eliminating criteria and iterating design, it realized that trial never should have begun in the first place.

There are a million ways to think about how to use this data, Drumright said, and as more customers begin to fully understand what they can do with it, her goal is to "make this information accessible in a way where it's easy at the point where it's needed, and consumable where it's needed."

The key to curing cancer might be more data

But whatever Trotter, Apixio, IMS and others accomplish will have been made possible because they have access to some valuable datasets, albeit not always with great ease. Many individuals who'd like to improve the health care system - if not our health, generally - aren't so lucky. Take, for example, the world's genetic researchers. It's very possible the data they need to discover the medical Holy Grail of a cure for cancer is locked in gene sequence data that only very few people will ever see.

David Haussler

According to University of California, Santa Cruz researcher David Haussler, the limited access that many geneticists and computer scientists like himself have to valuable genetic data is "a crime."

"We are on the brink of a real new understanding of cancer by being able to sequence cancer genomes," he told me during a recent interview, but big data will be the key to unlocking it.

There are 1.6 million cases of cancer in the United States every year, Haussler explained, and most of the information from those tumors is being ignored. This is partially because of privacy restrictions about who can access personal medical data and for what purposes, and partially because there isn't yet a concerted effort to collect the necessary genetic samples. As genome sequencing gets faster and cheaper, he says researchers need access to healthy and cancerous samples from the same person - and as many of these samples as possible - in order to analyze the "astounding" number of molecular changes that occur in every type and variation of cancer.

"We can't completely understand what we'll find, but we know we the only way we'll pull out signal from the noise is to [analyze all these genes]," Haussler said.

Haussler understands the need for privacy regulations, but thinks there's an opportunity to at least ease some current restrictions on how researchers access data. Even when there are relatively large (if not ideal) datasets available such as with the Cancer Genome Atlas project, researchers must apply to the National Institutes of Health for access, and the data must always remain behind an organizational firewall. Every cancer patient in the country could agree to having their data available to researchers, he said, but as long as that data isn't accessible over the internet it's only of limited utility.

He - along with others in the field - thinks cloud computing could be the solution because it gives genetic researchers a central location where they can access and perform computations on the data. Haussler and his team that house the Cancer Genome Atlas and a couple other projects currently have more than 400 terabytes of data and expect to have around 5 petabytes of data eventually. Downloading that is infeasible save for access to high-speed research networks, so "we need a place where people can experiment with these big data problems," Haussler said.

In the meantime, Haussler and his peers will keep on collecting and accessing genome data however they can. And they'll keep building software packages and algorithms that analyze that data better and faster than ever before. However, he lamented, "If we had the big data out there in an unrestricted setting, then all the best minds in the world would already be crunching on it."



http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OmMalik/~3/9dOuF37hR5M/story01.htm

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PSYCHOLOGY - Being bullied can cause trauma symptoms

Problems caused by bullying do not necessarily cease when the abuse stops. Recent research shows that victims may need long-term support.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-bullied-trauma-symptoms.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Combatting Attention Distraction Disorder: The Ultimate Tool

Over the last few months I have given myself a self-diagnosis of A.D.D. While I'm not sure that I meet the criteria to make me a hardcore case of Attention Deficit Disorder, I certainly have been struggling with "Attention Distraction Disorder." And the more I've shared my problem with other people - whether friends, clients or c

http://www.forbes.com/sites/margiewarrell/2012/11/28/combatting-attention-distraction-disorder/

PSYCHOLOGY - Tight times may influence how we perceive others

From the playground to the office, a key aspect of our social lives involves figuring out who "belongs" and who doesn't. Our biases lead us-whether we're aware of it or not-to favor people who belong to our own social group. Scientists theorize that these prevalent in-group biases may give us a competitive advantage against others, especially when important resources are limited.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-tight.html

SPIRITUALITY - Mayan Doomsday Forecast: Really ?!

Perhaps you've read the Mayan calendar will end December 21, 2012. Or heard predictions that the end of the Mayan calendar means our world will come to an end on December 21, 2012. Or the slightly sunnier prediction of a cataclysmic shift in world order, whatever that means. Damn. December 21 is my birthday.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnseigenthaler/2012/11/28/mayan-doomsday-forecast-really/

VITAMINS - Analysis of conflicting fish oil studies finds that omega-3 fatty acids still matter

Literally hundreds of clinical trials, including some that have gained widespread attention, have been done on the possible benefits of omega-3 fatty acids for the prevention of heart disease - producing conflicting results, varied claims, and frustrated consumers unsure what to believe.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-analysis-conflicting-fish-oil-omega-.html

VITAMINS - New review associates vitamin D with lower rates of tooth decay

A new review of existing studies points toward a potential role for vitamin D in helping to prevent dental caries, or tooth decay.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-associates-vitamin-d-tooth.html

WEIGHT - New treatment aids weight loss, improves diabetes in monkeys

(HealthDay)-A new, lab-created antibody that mimics the action of a naturally occurring molecule causes weight loss in monkeys, researchers report.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-treatment-aids-weight-loss-diabetes.html

HEALTH PORTATION News November 26th

BRAIN - Offering a reward can improve visual awareness in stroke patients
Stroke patients who have difficulty paying attention to part of their visual field may perform better when offered a reward, a study by Imperial College London and Brunel University researchers has found.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-reward-visual-awareness-patients.html

BRAIN - Study pinpoints brain area's role in learning
An area of the brain called the orbitofrontal cortex is responsible for decisions made on the spur of the moment, but not those made based on prior experience or habit, according to a new basic science study from substance abuse researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Scientists had previously believed that the area of the brain was responsible for both types of behavior and decision-making. The distinction is critical to understanding the neurobiology of decision-making, particularly with regard to substance abuse. The study was published online in the journal Science.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-brain-area-role.html


DIABETES - Gastric bypass surgery helps diabetes but doesn't cure it
After gastric bypass surgery, diabetes goes away for some people-often even before they lose much weight. So does that mean gastric surgery "cures" diabetes? Not necessarily, according to the largest community-based study of long-term diabetes outcomes after bariatric surgery. For most people in the study, e-published in advance of print in Obesity Surgery, diabetes either never remitted after gastric surgery or relapsed within five years.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-gastric-bypass-surgery-diabetes-doesnt.html


EXERCISE - Active lifestyle boosts brain structure and slows Alzheimer's disease
An active lifestyle helps preserve gray matter in the brains of older adults and could reduce the burden of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-lifestyle-boosts-brain-alzheimer-disease.html

EXERCISE - Too much or too little activity bad for knees
Both very high and very low levels of physical activity can accelerate the degeneration of knee cartilage in middle-aged adults, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-bad-knees.html


HEART - Researchers find smoking and high blood pressure may be linked to ageing of the brain
(Medical Xpress)-Researchers at King's College London have identified several cardiovascular risk factors, including smoking and high blood pressure, which may be associated with the accelerated decline of memory, learning, attention and reasoning in older adults.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-high-blood-pressure-linked-ageing.html


IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Boosting immune responses against leukaemia
(Medical Xpress)-In the first of its kind, a translational study undertaken at the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research has revealed that boosting the activity of a rare type of immune cell could be an effective way to vaccinate patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) against their own cancer.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-boosting-immune-responses-leukaemia.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - How defects in a signaling protein sabotage the immune system in multiple, seemingly contradictory ways
The antibody response to immune threats is managed by cells known as B lymphocytes. The differentiation and function of B cells are tightly regulated to ensure a prompt response to confirmed dangers, such as viruses or bacteria, and also to prevent the emergence of harmful autoimmune responses that can damage healthy tissues in the body.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-defects-protein-sabotage-immune-multiple.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - How does immune globulin therapy work? Now is the time to find out
Immune globulin replacement began decades ago as a treatment for patients who could not make their own protective antibodies, but has proven to have much broader benefits than originally expected. With new uses regularly being discovered for this limited and expensive resource, including as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease, now is the time to discover exactly how intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) treatments work, and to engineer a protein that can provide similar benefits, writes Erwin Gelfand, MD, chair of pediatrics at National Jewish Health in the November 22, 2012, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-immune-globulin-therapy.html

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Researchers describe elusive replication machinery of flu viruses
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have made a major advance in understanding how flu viruses replicate within infected cells. The researchers used cutting-edge molecular biology and electron-microscopy techniques to "see" one of influenza's essential protein complexes in unprecedented detail. The images generated in the study show flu virus proteins in the act of self-replication, highlighting the virus's vulnerabilities that are sure to be of interest to drug developers.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-elusive-replication-machinery-flu-viruses.html


NEWS - BioMAP screening procedure could streamline search for new antibiotics
Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have developed a new strategy for finding novel antibiotic compounds, using a diagnostic panel of bacterial strains for screening chemical extracts from natural sources.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-biomap-screening-procedure-antibiotics.html

NEWS - Did you see that? How could you miss it?
You may have received CPR training some time ago, but would you remember the proper technique in an emergency? Would you know what to do in the event of an earthquake or a fire? A new UCLA psychology study shows that people often do not recall things they have seen-or at least walked by-hundreds of times.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-did-you-that-how-could.html

NEWS - Drugs limiting excess mucus could save lives
Respiratory conditions that restrict breathing such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common killers worldwide. But no effective treatments exist to address the major cause of death in these conditions - excess mucus production.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-drugs-limiting-excess-mucus.html

NEWS - Is a New SARS-like Virus Spreading in the Middle East?
image thumbnail - see full story for attributions
Coronavirus image credit: Wikipedia As with most emerging epidemics, we usually ignore them until people start dying. If the same logic applies here, it's time to begin paying attention to the new SARS-like virus found in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. While only six cases have been identified so far, two of the patients died,
http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2012/11/24/is-a-new-sars-like-virus-spreading-in-the-middle-east/

NEWS - Knowing a patient's history of falls will help doctors predict future fractures
Clinicians are being urged to ask about a patient's history of falls as new research shows that the information is valuable in determining their future risk of fracture.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-patient-history-falls-doctors-future.html

NEWS - Putrescine water may be Fountain of Youth for eggs
An Ottawa scientist has discovered a critical reason why women experience fertility problems as they get older. The breakthrough by Dr. Johné Liu, a senior scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and professor at the University of Ottawa, also points to a simple solution that could increase the viability of egg cells for women in their late 30s and older-putrescine water.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-putrescine-fountain-youth-eggs.html

NEWS - Study: To get the best look at a person's face, look just below the eyes
They say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. However, to get a real idea of what a person is up to, according to UC Santa Barbara researchers Miguel Eckstein and Matt Peterson, the best place to check is right below the eyes. Their findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-person-eyes.html

NEWS - Survival gene may be key to controlling HIV and hepatitis
A newly discovered gene that is essential for embryo survival could also hold the key to treating and potentially controlling chronic infections such as HIV, hepatitis and tuberculosis. The gene, called Arih2, is fundamental to the function of the immune system -- making critical decisions about whether to switch on the immune response to an infection.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121126131349.htm

NEWS - UCLA performs first 'breathing lung' transplant in US
First there was the "heart in a box," a revolutionary experimental technology that allows donor hearts to be delivered to transplant recipients warm and beating rather than frozen in an ice cooler.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-ucla-lung-transplant-states.html


NEWS-CANCER - Metabolic protein launches sugar feast that nurtures brain tumors
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have tracked down a cancer-promoting protein's pathway into the cell nucleus and discovered how, once there, it fires up a glucose metabolism pathway on which brain tumors thrive.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-metabolic-protein-sugar-feast-nurtures.html

NEWS-CANCER - Metabolic protein launches sugar feast that nurtures brain tumors
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have tracked down a cancer-promoting protein's pathway into the cell nucleus and discovered how, once there, it fires up a glucose metabolism pathway on which brain tumors thrive.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-metabolic-protein-sugar-feast-nurtures.html

NEWS-CANCER - New electrically conductive polymer nanoparticles can generate heat to kill colorectal cancer cells
Researchers have modified electrically conductive polymers, commonly used in solar energy applications, to develop revolutionary polymer nanoparticles for a medical application. When the nanoparticles are exposed to infrared light, they generate heat that can be used to kill colorectal cancer cells.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121120152413.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Pathway identified in human lymphoma points way to new blood cancer treatments
A pathway called the "Unfolded Protein Response," or UPR, a cell's way of responding to unfolded and misfolded proteins, helps tumor cells escape programmed cell death during the development of lymphoma.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-pathway-human-lymphoma-blood-cancer.html

NEWS-CANCER - Routine checkups don't cut cancer, heart deaths, study says
(HealthDay)-Routine checkups don't help reduce a patient's risk of dying from either heart disease or cancer, new Danish research suggests.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-routine-checkups-dont-cancer-heart.html

NEWS-CANCER - Scientists identify potential drug target for inflammatory diseases including cancers
A*STAR scientists have identified the enzyme, telomerase, as a cause of chronic inflammation in human cancers. Chronic inflammation is now recognized as a key underlying cause for the development of many human cancers, autoimmune disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic diseases such as diabetes. This enzyme, which is known to be responsible for providing cancer cells the endless ability to divide, is now found to also jumpstart and maintain chronic inflammation in cancers.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-scientists-potential-drug-inflammatory-diseases.html


PSYCHOLOGY - Bothered by negative, unwanted thoughts? Just throw them away
(Medical Xpress)-If you want to get rid of unwanted, negative thoughts, try just ripping them up and tossing them in the trash.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-bothered-negative-unwanted-thoughts.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Grief expert offers tips on holiday survival
Ornaments glistening on a pine tree, carols filling the air, shoppers scurrying through stores and the smell of goodies baking in the oven - it's the holidays. For many this truly is the most wonderful time of the year. Still, for those who have lost a loved one, the empty chair at the table or one less present under the tree can be a painful reminder of the one who is missing.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-grief-expert-holiday-survival.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Myth debunked: Full moon does not increase incidence of psychological problems
Contrary to popular belief, there is no connection between lunar phases and the incidence of psychological problems. This is the conclusion reached by a team of researchers after having examined the relationship between the moon's phases and the number of patients who show up at hospital emergency rooms experiencing psychological problems.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121119114255.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Nix the all-nighter: A good night's sleep is key to doing well on exams
As fall semesters wind down at the country's colleges and universities, students will be pulling all-night study sessions to prepare for final exams. Ironically, the loss of sleep during these all-nighters could actually work against them performing well, says a Harris Health System sleep specialist.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-nix-all-nighter-good-night-key.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Researchers propose a new approach to understanding common psychiactric treatments
(Medical Xpress)-Drugs for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia often require weeks to take full effect. "What takes so long?" has formed one of psychiatry's most stubborn mysteries. Now a fresh look at previous research on quite a different drug-nicotine-is providing answers. The new ideas may point the way toward new generations of psychiatric drugs that work faster and better.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-approach-common-psychiactric-treatments.html

PSYCHOLOGY - Risk aversity visible in the brain
Some people live their lives by the motto "no risk - no fun!" and avoid hardly any risks. Others are clearly more cautious and focus primarily on safety when investing and for other business activities. Scientists from the University of Bonn in cooperation with colleagues from the University of Zurich studied the attitudes towards risk in a group of 56 subjects. They found that in people who preferred safety, certain regions of the brain show a higher level of activation when they are confronted with quite unforeseeable situations. In addition, they do not distinguish as clearly as risk takers whether a situation is more or less risky than expected. The results have just been published in the renowned Journal of Neuroscience.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-aversity-visible-brain.html


SLEEP - An antidote for hypersomnia
Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have discovered that dozens of adults with an elevated need for sleep have a substance in their cerebrospinal fluid that acts like a sleeping pill.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-antidote-hypersomnia.html


SLEEP - Music to the ears for a good night's sleep? New therapy for insomnia
If you are among the 50 percent of Americans who suffer from insomnia, then you have probably tried everything - from warm milk to melatonin pills or prescription medications to induce sleep - with varying degrees of success and side effects. But what if sleep could be achieved not by a substance, but through 'balancing' brain activity?
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-music-ears-good-night-therapy.html

SLEEP - Re-Timer ready to reset sleep
(Medical Xpress)-Today saw the launch of Re-Timer, a wearable green light device invented by Flinders University sleep researchers to reset the body's internal clock.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-re-timer-ready-reset.html


VITAMINS - Lack of nutrients and metabolic syndrome linked to different subtypes of depression
A low intake of folate and vitamin B12 increases the risk of melancholic depressive symptoms, according to a study among nearly 3,000 middle-aged and elderly Finnish subjects. On the other hand, non-melancholic depressive symptoms are associated with an increased risk for the metabolic syndrome. Based on these new observations, melancholic and non-melancholic depression may be separate depressive subtypes with different etiologies in terms of proinflammation and diet. The study was the first to look at these depressive sub-types separately.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-lack-nutrients-metabolic-syndrome-linked.html


WEIGHT - 'Obese but happy gene' challenges the common perception of link between depression and obesity
Researchers at McMaster University have discovered new genetic evidence about why some people are happier than others.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-obese-happy-gene-common-perception.html