HEALTH PORTATION News January 30th

BRAIN - A step toward repairing the central nervous system
Despite recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of nerve injury, tissue-engineering solutions for repairing damage in the central nervous system (CNS) remain elusive, owing to the crucial and complex role played by the neural stem cell (NSC) niche. This zone, in which stem cells are retained after embryonic development for the production of new cells, exerts a tight control over many crucial tasks such as growth promotion and the recreati ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-central-nervous.htm

BRAIN - Better way to culture central nervous cells
A protein associated with neuron damage in Alzheimer's patients provides a superior scaffold for growing central nervous system cells in the lab. The findings could have clinical implications for producing neural implants and offers new insights on the complex link between the apoE4 apolipoprotein and Alzheimer's disease ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129111747.ht


BRAIN - Dementia sufferers benefit from GPS
As part of the research project Trygge Spor, more than fifty dementia sufferers have been using GPS for periods varying from several weeks to up to a year. The results show that localisation technology helps achieve an increased sense of security, freedom and quality of life, both for sufferers and their next of kin ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-dementia-benefit-gps.h

BRAIN - Even the brains of people with anxiety states can get used to fear
Fear is a protective function against possible dangers that is designed to save our lives. Where there are problems with this fear mechanism, its positive effects are cancelled out: patients who have a social phobia become afraid of perfectly normal, everyday social situations because they are worried about behaving inappropriately or being thought of as stupid by other people. Scientists from the Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Technol ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-brains-people-anxiety-

BRAIN - How brain cells shape temperature preferences
A new study shows that a complex set of overlapping neuronal circuits works in concert to drive temperature preferences in the fruit fly Drosophila by affecting a single target, a heavy bundle of neurons within the fly brain known as the mushroom body ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129190251.ht

BRAIN - Identity of Famous 19th-Century Brain Discovered
A French craftsman who battled epilepsy his entire life donated his brain and helped scientists identify the brain's language center ...
http://news.discovery.com/history/us-history/brain-identity-

BRAIN - In-brain monitoring shows memory network
Working with patients with electrodes implanted in their brains, researchers have shown for the first time that areas of the brain work together at the same time to recall memories. The unique approach promises new insights into how we remember details of time and place ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129144817.ht

BRAIN - Medical societies unite on patient-centered measures for nonsurgical stroke interventions
The first outcome-based guidelines for interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke-providing recommendations for rapid treatment-will benefit individuals suffering from brain attacks, often caused by artery-blocking blood clots. Representatives from the Society of Interventional Radiology and seven other medical societies created a multispecialty and international consensus on the metrics and benchmarks for processes of care and technical a ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-medical-societies-pati

BRAIN - Physicians' brain scans indicate doctors can feel their patients' pain-and their relief
A patient's relationship with his or her doctor has long been considered an important component of healing. Now, in a novel investigation in which physicians underwent brain scans while they believed they were actually treating patients, researchers have provided the first scientific evidence indicating that doctors truly can feel their patients' pain - and can also experience their relief following treatment ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-physicians-brain-scans

BRAIN - Placebo often effective for treating headache in children
(HealthDay)-Placebo is often effective in treating children with headaches, and innovative strategies are needed to reduce the placebo response rate and prove drug effects in trials, according to two studies published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Pediatrics ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-placebo-effective-head

BRAIN - Study shows how brain cells shape temperature preferences
While the wooly musk ox may like it cold, fruit flies definitely do not. They like it hot, or at least warm. In fact, their preferred optimum temperature is very similar to that of humans-76 degrees F ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-brain-cells-temperatur

BRAIN - Team discovers potential blood test for autistic patients
(Medical Xpress)-Results of a recent clinical study by researchers from Western and the University of Arkansas reveal the presence of a unique blood marker, which may further the understanding of possible gut linked environmental contributors to autism. The findings may also forecast potential blood tests for early screening to identify and potentially treat the condition, even before symptoms present ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-team-potential-blood-a

DIABETES - Diabetes drug could hold promise for lung cancer patients
Ever since discovering a decade ago that a gene altered in lung cancer regulated an enzyme used in therapies against diabetes, Reuben Shaw has wondered if drugs originally designed to treat metabolic diseases could also work against cancer ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-diabetes-drug-lung-can

DIABETES - Dual-hormone artificial pancreas is a step closer for patients with Type 1 diabetes
For patients with type 1 diabetes, a dual-hormone artificial pancreas system (also known as a closed-loop delivery system) improved the control of glucose levels and reduced the risk of hypoglycemia compared with conventional pump treatment in a trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-dual-hormone-artificia

DIABETES - Link found between insulin sensitivity, cells' powerhouses
If findings of a new study in mice are any indication, it might be possible to fine-tune cellular powerhouses called mitochondria, tweaking one aspect to increase insulin sensitivity, reduce body and fat mass, and even extend life. Exploiting this target could one day lead to novel treatments for type 2 diabetes-an endocrine system disease that affects 8 percent of the U.S. population. The research also points to promising new avenues of investig ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-link-insulin-sensitivi

DIGESTION - Treating constipation in seniors: A review of current treatments
For seniors who are constipated, the use of polyethylene glycol and lactulose are effective, according to a review of current treatments published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). The article reviews the latest evidence on the efficacy and safety of treatments to help doctors treat their patients ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-constipation-seniors-c



EXERCISE - Taking stairs, raking leaves may equal a trip to the gym, study finds
New research at Oregon State University suggests the health benefits of small amounts of activity - even as small as one- and two-minute increments that add up to 30 minutes per day - can be just as beneficial as longer bouts of physical exercise achieved by a trip to the gym ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-stairs-raking-equal-gy

FOODS - Could the timing of when you eat, be just as important as what you eat?
Most weight-loss plans center around a balance between caloric intake and energy expenditure. However, new research has shed light on a new factor that is necessary to shed pounds: timing. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), in collaboration with the University of Murcia and Tufts University, have found that it's not simply what you eat, but also when you eat, that may help with weight-loss regulation ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-important.htm

FOODS - Eating bright-colored fruits and vegetables may prevent or delay ALS
New research suggests that increased consumption of foods containing colorful carotenoids, particularly beta-carotene and lutein, may prevent or delay the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study, published by Wiley in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, found that diets high in lycopene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and vitamin C did not reduce ALS risk ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-bright-colored-fruits-

FOODS - Food for thought: Killing a cow is the least effective way to make a steak
Innovation could utterly transform the way meat is created and consumed in the world, making it more efficient and removing some of the problems like greenhouse emissions. While I didn't get a chance to attend The Intersection conference at the Googleplex recently, a sentence from notes on a discussion between VC Steve Jurvetson and Microsoft co-founder Nathan Myhrvold at the event stood out for me on the subject of meat and innovation: "Killing ...
http://gigaom.com/2013/01/28/killing-a-cow-is-the-least-effe

FOODS - Just a bite: Considerably smaller snack portions satisfy delayed hunger and craving
How much chocolate would you need to eat to be satisfied? Less than half as much as you think, according to this recently published Cornell University snacking study. Using chocolate chips, apple pie, and potato chips, researchers Ellen van Kleef, Mitsuru Shimizu, and Brian Wansink designed a study to determine if people who were given smaller portions of snack foods would feel hungrier or satisfied fifteen minutes after eating ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-considerably-smaller-s

FOODS - OpenTable gobbles up Foodspotting for $10M
The best-known site for online restaurant reservations will acquire one of the original food photo mobile apps, Foodspotting, both companies announced Tuesday morning. OpenTable will get the three-year-old San Francisco-based company for $10 million in cash. It's not a huge return for Foodspotting's investors, Blue Run Ventures, who put $3.75 million into the company. "We're so happy to have found a home for Foodspotting where our community can c ...
http://gigaom.com/2013/01/29/opentable-gobbles-up-foodspotti

FOODS - Smaller Snacking is Smart Snacking: New study shows 'just a bite' will satisfy
How much chocolate would you need to eat to be satisfied? Less than half as much as you think, according to a new snacking study ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129144815.ht

FOODS - Some health benefits of berries may not make it past your mouth
Research has suggested that compounds that give colorful fruits their rich hues, especially berries, promote health and might even prevent cancer. But for the first time, scientists have exposed extracts from numerous berries high in those pigments to human saliva to see just what kinds of health-promoting substances are likely to survive and be produced in the mouth ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-health-benefits-berrie

FOODS - Study says leafy greens top food poisoning source
(AP)-A government study has fingered leafy green vegetables as the leading source of food poisoning illnesses ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-leafy-greens-food-pois

FOODS - Study shows no evidence Mediterranean diet helps prevent cognitive decline
(Medical Xpress)-Researchers from the Sorbonne in France have published the results of a study they carried out to determine if eating a Mediterranean diet helps prevent dementia as people age. They found, as they report in their paper published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that such a diet had no apparent impact on cognitive decline ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-evidence-mediterranean

FOODS - The Onion: There's No Such Thing As Happy Meat
"We Raise All Our Beef Humanely On Open Pasture And Then We Hang Them Upside Down And Slash Their Throats ...
http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/onion-theres-no-such-th

FOODS - Vine is the best we've seen in social video, but is it good enough?
If I'm being totally honest, I'd tell you I don't like video. Sure, I'll settle in to watch a movie at the theater, but when it comes to short clips posted on the web? I'll pass. I'd much prefer to scan text than watch a video, and unless your clip is a few seconds long, I'm not going to wait for it to buffer. Got a transcript? Please post. I probably have less tolerance for video than most people, but in looking through the number of social vide ...
http://gigaom.com/2013/01/29/vine-is-the-best-weve-seen-in-s

HEART - Argentine woman gives birth after heart transplant
In what doctors Tuesday said was a medical first, an Argentine woman with a transplanted heart gave birth to a baby girl following an in vitro fertilization ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-argentine-woman-birth-

HEART - Cardiac disease linked to higher risk of mental impairment
Cardiac disease is associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment such as problems with language, thinking and judgment-particularly among women with heart disease, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Known as nonamnestic because it doesn't include memory loss, this type of mild cognitive impairment may be a precursor to vascular and other non-Alzheimer's dementias, according to the findings published online Monday in JAMA Neurology ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cardiac-disease-linked

HEART - Islet transplant may slow progression of atherosclerosis
Minimally invasive islet transplantation for patients with type 1 diabetes achieves insulin independence and reverses the progression of atherosclerosis in the first few years after transplant, according to a University of Illinois at Chicago study ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-islet-transplant-ather

HEART - Long-Term Outcomes Favor Heart Surgery Over Stents and Angioplasty
Patients who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery have a lower overall composite risk for heart attack, stroke, and death in the 4 years following the procedure compared to patients who undergo stenting or balloon procedures, according to a new study ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129074422.ht

HEART - MRI-friendly defibrillator implant opens doors for thousands of cardiac patients currently denied MRIs
Every year an estimated 1.5 million magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are performed in Canada and the number is growing at a rate of about 10 per cent per year. At the same time, a soaring number of Canadians who rely on implanted defibrillators to keep their hearts beating are denied this valuable, life-saving diagnostic test despite a 50 to 75 per cent probability that they will require one over the lifetime of their defibrillator ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-mri-friendly-defibrill

HEART - Study clarifies antidepressant contribution to arrhythmia risk
A 2011 warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about the popular antidepressant citalopram (Celexa) left many patients and physicians with more questions than answers. Now an analysis of the medical records of more than 38,000 patients by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators clarifies the contribution of citalopram and other antidepressants to lengthening of the QT interval, an aspect of the heart's electrical activity th ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-antidepressant-contrib

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - New findings into conquering influenza
Reseachers from the University of Melbourne and The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) have discovered a new protein that protects against viral infections such as influenza ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-conquering-influenza.h

LONGEVITY - Hydrogen sulfide: The next anti-aging agent?
Hydrogen sulfide may play a wide-ranging role in staving off aging, according to a new article. In this review article, a team from China explores the compound's plethora of potential anti-aging pathways ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129121945.ht

NEWS - 'Super' enzyme protects against dangers of oxygen
(Phys.org)-Just like a comic book super hero, you could say that the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1) has a secret identity. Since its discovery in 1969, scientists believed SOD1's only role was to protect living cells against damage from free radicals. Now, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered that SOD1 protects cells by regulating cell energy and metabolism. The results of their research were publ ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-01-super-enzyme-dangers-oxygen.htm

NEWS - Cadavers honored in med student dissection lab
(AP)-When medical students have finished their study and practice on cadavers, they often hold a respectful memorial service to honor these bodies donated to science ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cadavers-honored-med-s

NEWS - Dr. Oz And Mr. Hyde: What Medicine Should Learn From Mehmet
In the current issue of The New Yorker, Michael Specter, journalism's great chronicler of how we know what we know, profiles Mehmet Oz, the surgeon and TV star who Oprah herself sainted as "America's doctor." (Go read it now, then come back.) In the piece, Specter finds Oz both saving lives and promoting bunkum. Here are seven people, products, and ideas Specter catches Oz promoting that are absolutely, positively, wrong ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2013/01/29/dr-oz-a

NEWS - Europe fends off alien species
To help decision makers mitigate the consequence of alien plant and animal invasion, an EU-wide database maintains a black list of these unwelcome biological invaders ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-01-europe-fends-alien-species.htm

NEWS - FDA warns company over unapproved flu remedy
Federal regulators say a Florida company has been marketing an untested inhaled formula as a flu remedy in violation of drug safety regulations ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-fda-company-unapproved

NEWS - Genetics may explain severe flu in Chinese people
A genetic variant commonly found in Chinese people may help explain why some got seriously ill with swine flu, a discovery scientists say could help pinpoint why flu viruses hit some populations particularly hard and change how they are treated ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-genetics-severe-flu-ch

NEWS - More research into chronic diseases urgently needed in all countries
When considering chronic (non-communicable) diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, in low-and-middle countries, a major shift in approach from declaring what needs to be done to using research to prioritise, evaluate, monitor and improve health outcomes is urgently needed, according to international experts from London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine writing in this week's PLOS Medicine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-chronic-diseases-urgen

NEWS - New drill-less technique may reduce kids' fear of the dentist
(Medical Xpress)-Children have been shown to significantly prefer a new way of treating tooth decay that doesn't involve needles or drills ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-drill-less-technique-k

NEWS - No proof drugs ease kids' migraines, study says
(HealthDay)-Children and teens who get migraine headaches suffer in multiple ways, missing school and fun time with friends while waiting for the debilitating pain to subside ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-proof-drugs-ease-kids-

NEWS - Scientists discover potential new target in fight against 'superbug'
University of Cambridge researchers have discovered how an antibiotic-resistant superbug exploits oxygen-limited conditions in the lungs of patients with severe respiratory disease to thrive ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-scientists-potential-s

NEWS - Soldier looks forward to driving with new arms (Update)
A U.S. soldier who lost all four limbs in a roadside bombing in Iraq says he's looking forward to driving and swimming with new arms after undergoing a double-arm transplant ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-soldier-rare-double-ar

NEWS - Study shows climate change could affect onset and severity of flu seasons
The American public can expect to add earlier and more severe flu seasons to the fallout from climate change, according to a research study published online Jan. 28 in PLOS Currents: Influenza ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-climate-affect-onset-s

NEWS - Telephone physiotherapy reduces waiting times and provides equally good patient results
A physiotherapy service based on initial telephone assessment has the ability to provide faster access to the service and cut waiting times, a study published today in BMJ suggests ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-physiotherapy-equally-

NEWS - Tomorrow's life-saving medications may currently be living at the bottom of the sea
OHSU researchers, in partnership with scientists from several other institutions, have published two new research papers that signal how the next class of powerful medications may currently reside at the bottom of the ocean. In both cases, the researchers were focused on ocean-based mollusks - a category of animal that includes snails, clams and squid and their bacterial companions ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-01-tomorrow-life-saving-medication

NEWS - UN agency warns of new global bird flu threat
The UN food agency on Tuesday warned the world risked a surge in bird flu outbreaks unless countries strengthen their monitoring against dangerous animal diseases despite economic hardship ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-agency-global-bird-flu

NEWS-CANCER - British 'stiff upper lip' may prevent early presentation for cancer symptoms
Embarrassment and not wanting to waste their doctors' time are more frequently reported by British people than in other countries, according to new research led jointly by King's College London and UCL (University College London). This may be holding British people back from presenting early with symptoms of cancer ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-british-stiff-upper-li

NEWS-CANCER - Cancer death rates over a third higher in men than women
Men are over 35 per cent more likely to die from cancer than women in the UK, according to a new report released today ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cancer-death-higher-me

NEWS-CANCER - Eating deep-fried food associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, study finds
Regular consumption of deep-fried foods such as French fries, fried chicken and doughnuts is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, and the effect appears to be slightly stronger with regard to more aggressive forms of the disease, according to a study by investigators at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-deep-fried-food-prosta

NEWS-CANCER - New Study Shows How Stress Feeds Cancer Cells
For years we've heard that there's a connection between stress and cancer. The claim is anecdotal, but has a certain horse sense that appeals to reason -- stress is hard on the body, causing hormonal reactions that can potentially influence the development of cancerous cells ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/01/29/new-stud

PSYCHOLOGY - 'Moral realism' may lead to better moral behavior
People who are primed with "moral realism" may be motivated to better moral behavior. Researchers assess the impact of meta-ethics on everyday decision-making in a new report ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129121939.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - Feeling flirty? Wait for the sun to shine
We all know how casual flirtation can lift one's mood, which can be important at this time of year when the winter blues are at their peak. But if you are more serious about your flirting and hope to get that all important phone number, you're better off waiting until it's sunny, according to new French research published in the journal Social Influence ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-flirty-sun.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - First ever UK based language tool to decode baby talk under development
A tool which could radically improve the diagnosis of language delays in infants in the UK is being developed by psychologists ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129130907.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - Power helps you live the good life by bringing you closer to your true self
How does being in a position of power at work, with friends, or in a romantic relationship influence well-being? While we might like to believe the stereotype that power leads to unhappiness or loneliness, new research indicates that this stereotype is largely untrue: Being in a position of power may actually make people happier ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-power-good-life-closer

PSYCHOLOGY - Rats, like humans, return to drinking once punishment is removed
Once heavy drinking impairs function, a variety of punishment-related threats may motivate people to stop drinking: spouses may threaten divorce, employers may threaten job loss, and courts threaten drunk drivers with losing their driver's license or incarceration. In the face of these threats, many alcohol abusers refrain from drinking, but relapse is very common when the threats of punishment fade, particularly when exposed to alcohol-associate ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130082449.ht

SKIN - Messenger substance and signalling molecule influence the development of the skin's immune cells
A signalling molecule known as Axl has been discovered on immune cells of the epidermis. This recently published finding provides new insight into the development of important skin immune cells known as Langerhans cells. These cells fight off invading microorganisms and play a crucial role in our health. As the research project, funded by the Austrian Science Fund FWF, also discovered, the natural production of the signalling molecule Axl is high ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-messenger-substance-mo

SKIN - Skin, soft tissue infections succumb to blue light
Blue light can selectively eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of the skin and soft tissues, while preserving the outermost layer of skin, according to a proof-of-principle study led by Michael R. Hamblin of the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Harvard Medical School, Boston. The research is published online ahead of print in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherap ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-skin-soft-tissue-infec

SLEEP - Previously unknown sleep pattern revealed in new research
(Medical Xpress)-There's no need to panic if you didn't get a solid eight hours of beauty sleep last night. According to new University of Sydney research, sleep duration naturally waxes and wanes over a period of days regardless of individual lifestyle, timing of sleep or waking, and social and environmental influences ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-previously-unknown-pat

VITAMINS - Tomorrow's life-saving medications may currently be living at the bottom of the sea
Two new research articles demonstrate how the next class of powerful medications may currently reside at the bottom of the ocean. In both cases, the researchers were focused on ocean-based mollusks - a category of animal that includes snails, clams and squid and their bacterial companions ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129130949.ht

WEIGHT - In CAD, highest mortality risk for central obesity, normal BMI
(HealthDay)-For individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD), central obesity in combination with normal weight is associated with the highest risk of mortality, according to research published in the Feb. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cad-highest-mortality-

WEIGHT - Obesity and its consequences spreading rapidly around the world
Clogged arteries and sedentary lifestyles have replaced germs as the world's leading killers. Where hunger once held much of the world in its grip, the 1.6 billion overweight and obese now outnumber the malnourished by nearly 2-to-1 ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-obesity-consequences-r

BRAIN - Team discovers potential blood test for autistic patients

(Medical Xpress)-Results of a recent clinical study by researchers from Western and the University of Arkansas reveal the presence of a unique blood marker, which may further the understanding of possible gut linked environmental contributors to autism. The findings may also forecast potential blood tests for early screening to identify and potentially treat the condition, even before symptoms present.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-team-potential-blood-autistic-pa

BRAIN - Medical societies unite on patient-centered measures for nonsurgical stroke interventions

The first outcome-based guidelines for interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke-providing recommendations for rapid treatment-will benefit individuals suffering from brain attacks, often caused by artery-blocking blood clots. Representatives from the Society of Interventional Radiology and seven other medical societies created a multispecialty and international consensus on the metrics and benchmarks for processes of care and technical and clinical outcomes for stroke patients.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-medical-societies-patient-center

BRAIN - How brain cells shape temperature preferences

A new study shows that a complex set of overlapping neuronal circuits works in concert to drive temperature preferences in the fruit fly Drosophila by affecting a single target, a heavy bundle of neurons within the fly brain known as the mushroom body.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129190251.ht

BRAIN - In-brain monitoring shows memory network

Working with patients with electrodes implanted in their brains, researchers have shown for the first time that areas of the brain work together at the same time to recall memories. The unique approach promises new insights into how we remember details of time and place.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129144817.ht

BRAIN - Identity of Famous 19th-Century Brain Discovered

A French craftsman who battled epilepsy his entire life donated his brain and helped scientists identify the brain's language center.
http://news.discovery.com/history/us-history/brain-identity-discovered

BRAIN - Even the brains of people with anxiety states can get used to fear

Fear is a protective function against possible dangers that is designed to save our lives. Where there are problems with this fear mechanism, its positive effects are cancelled out: patients who have a social phobia become afraid of perfectly normal, everyday social situations because they are worried about behaving inappropriately or being thought of as stupid by other people. Scientists from the Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Technology and the University Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at the MedUni Vienna have now discovered that this fear circuit can be deactivated, at least in part.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-brains-people-anxiety-states.htm

BRAIN - Study shows how brain cells shape temperature preferences

While the wooly musk ox may like it cold, fruit flies definitely do not. They like it hot, or at least warm. In fact, their preferred optimum temperature is very similar to that of humans-76 degrees F.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-brain-cells-temperature.htm

BRAIN - Placebo often effective for treating headache in children

(HealthDay)-Placebo is often effective in treating children with headaches, and innovative strategies are needed to reduce the placebo response rate and prove drug effects in trials, according to two studies published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-placebo-effective-headache-child

BRAIN - Physicians' brain scans indicate doctors can feel their patients' pain-and their relief

A patient's relationship with his or her doctor has long been considered an important component of healing. Now, in a novel investigation in which physicians underwent brain scans while they believed they were actually treating patients, researchers have provided the first scientific evidence indicating that doctors truly can feel their patients' pain - and can also experience their relief following treatment.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-physicians-brain-scans-doctors-p

BRAIN - A step toward repairing the central nervous system

Despite recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of nerve injury, tissue-engineering solutions for repairing damage in the central nervous system (CNS) remain elusive, owing to the crucial and complex role played by the neural stem cell (NSC) niche. This zone, in which stem cells are retained after embryonic development for the production of new cells, exerts a tight control over many crucial tasks such as growth promotion and the recreation of essential biochemical and physical cues for neural cell differentiation.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-central-nervous.htm

BRAIN - Dementia sufferers benefit from GPS

As part of the research project Trygge Spor, more than fifty dementia sufferers have been using GPS for periods varying from several weeks to up to a year. The results show that localisation technology helps achieve an increased sense of security, freedom and quality of life, both for sufferers and their next of kin.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-dementia-benefit-gps.htm

BRAIN - Better way to culture central nervous cells

A protein associated with neuron damage in Alzheimer's patients provides a superior scaffold for growing central nervous system cells in the lab. The findings could have clinical implications for producing neural implants and offers new insights on the complex link between the apoE4 apolipoprotein and Alzheimer's disease.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129111747.ht

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-culture-central-nervous-cells.ht

DIABETES - Link found between insulin sensitivity, cells' powerhouses

If findings of a new study in mice are any indication, it might be possible to fine-tune cellular powerhouses called mitochondria, tweaking one aspect to increase insulin sensitivity, reduce body and fat mass, and even extend life. Exploiting this target could one day lead to novel treatments for type 2 diabetes-an endocrine system disease that affects 8 percent of the U.S. population. The research also points to promising new avenues of investigation in the biology of aging.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-link-insulin-sensitivity-cells-p

DIABETES - Diabetes drug could hold promise for lung cancer patients

Ever since discovering a decade ago that a gene altered in lung cancer regulated an enzyme used in therapies against diabetes, Reuben Shaw has wondered if drugs originally designed to treat metabolic diseases could also work against cancer.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-diabetes-drug-lung-cancer-patien

DIABETES - Dual-hormone artificial pancreas is a step closer for patients with Type 1 diabetes

For patients with type 1 diabetes, a dual-hormone artificial pancreas system (also known as a closed-loop delivery system) improved the control of glucose levels and reduced the risk of hypoglycemia compared with conventional pump treatment in a trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-dual-hormone-artificial-pancreas

DIGESTION - Treating constipation in seniors: A review of current treatments

For seniors who are constipated, the use of polyethylene glycol and lactulose are effective, according to a review of current treatments published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). The article reviews the latest evidence on the efficacy and safety of treatments to help doctors treat their patients.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-constipation-seniors-current-tre

EXERCISE - Taking stairs, raking leaves may equal a trip to the gym, study finds

New research at Oregon State University suggests the health benefits of small amounts of activity - even as small as one- and two-minute increments that add up to 30 minutes per day - can be just as beneficial as longer bouts of physical exercise achieved by a trip to the gym.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-stairs-raking-equal-gym.htm

FOODS - Could the timing of when you eat, be just as important as what you eat?

Most weight-loss plans center around a balance between caloric intake and energy expenditure. However, new research has shed light on a new factor that is necessary to shed pounds: timing. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), in collaboration with the University of Murcia and Tufts University, have found that it's not simply what you eat, but also when you eat, that may help with weight-loss regulation.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-important.htm

FOODS - Eating bright-colored fruits and vegetables may prevent or delay ALS

New research suggests that increased consumption of foods containing colorful carotenoids, particularly beta-carotene and lutein, may prevent or delay the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study, published by Wiley in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, found that diets high in lycopene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and vitamin C did not reduce ALS risk.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-bright-colored-fruits-vegetables

FOODS - Food for thought: Killing a cow is the least effective way to make a steak

Innovation could utterly transform the way meat is created and consumed in the world, making it more efficient and removing some of the problems like greenhouse emissions. While I didn't get a chance to attend The Intersection conference at the Googleplex recently, a sentence from notes on a discussion between VC Steve Jurvetson and Microsoft co-founder Nathan Myhrvold at the event stood out for me on the subject of meat and innovation: "Killing ...

http://gigaom.com/2013/01/28/killing-a-cow-is-the-least-effective-way-

FOODS - Just a bite: Considerably smaller snack portions satisfy delayed hunger and craving

How much chocolate would you need to eat to be satisfied? Less than half as much as you think, according to this recently published Cornell University snacking study. Using chocolate chips, apple pie, and potato chips, researchers Ellen van Kleef, Mitsuru Shimizu, and Brian Wansink designed a study to determine if people who were given smaller portions of snack foods would feel hungrier or satisfied fifteen minutes after eating.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-considerably-smaller-snack-porti

FOODS - OpenTable gobbles up Foodspotting for $10M

The best-known site for online restaurant reservations will acquire one of the original food photo mobile apps, Foodspotting, both companies announced Tuesday morning. OpenTable will get the three-year-old San Francisco-based company for $10 million in cash. It's not a huge return for Foodspotting's investors, Blue Run Ventures, who put $3.75 million into the company. "We're so happy to have found a home for Foodspotting where our community can c ...

http://gigaom.com/2013/01/29/opentable-gobbles-up-foodspotting

FOODS - Smaller Snacking is Smart Snacking: New study shows 'just a bite' will satisfy

How much chocolate would you need to eat to be satisfied? Less than half as much as you think, according to a new snacking study.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129144815.ht

FOODS - Some health benefits of berries may not make it past your mouth

Research has suggested that compounds that give colorful fruits their rich hues, especially berries, promote health and might even prevent cancer. But for the first time, scientists have exposed extracts from numerous berries high in those pigments to human saliva to see just what kinds of health-promoting substances are likely to survive and be produced in the mouth.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-health-benefits-berries-mouth.ht

FOODS - Study says leafy greens top food poisoning source

(AP)-A government study has fingered leafy green vegetables as the leading source of food poisoning illnesses.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-leafy-greens-food-poisoning-sour

FOODS - Study shows no evidence Mediterranean diet helps prevent cognitive decline

(Medical Xpress)-Researchers from the Sorbonne in France have published the results of a study they carried out to determine if eating a Mediterranean diet helps prevent dementia as people age. They found, as they report in their paper published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that such a diet had no apparent impact on cognitive decline.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-evidence-mediterranean-diet-cogn

FOODS - The Onion: There's No Such Thing As Happy Meat

"We Raise All Our Beef Humanely On Open Pasture And Then We Hang Them Upside Down And Slash Their Throats"

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/onion-theres-no-such-thing-happy-

FOODS - Vine is the best we've seen in social video, but is it good enough?

If I'm being totally honest, I'd tell you I don't like video. Sure, I'll settle in to watch a movie at the theater, but when it comes to short clips posted on the web? I'll pass. I'd much prefer to scan text than watch a video, and unless your clip is a few seconds long, I'm not going to wait for it to buffer. Got a transcript? Please post. I probably have less tolerance for video than most people, but in looking through the number of social vide ...

http://gigaom.com/2013/01/29/vine-is-the-best-weve-seen-in-social-vide

HEART - Argentine woman gives birth after heart transplant

In what doctors Tuesday said was a medical first, an Argentine woman with a transplanted heart gave birth to a baby girl following an in vitro fertilization.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-argentine-woman-birth-heart-tran

HEART - Cardiac disease linked to higher risk of mental impairment

Cardiac disease is associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment such as problems with language, thinking and judgment-particularly among women with heart disease, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Known as nonamnestic because it doesn't include memory loss, this type of mild cognitive impairment may be a precursor to vascular and other non-Alzheimer's dementias, according to the findings published online Monday in JAMA Neurology.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cardiac-disease-linked-higher-me

HEART - Islet transplant may slow progression of atherosclerosis

Minimally invasive islet transplantation for patients with type 1 diabetes achieves insulin independence and reverses the progression of atherosclerosis in the first few years after transplant, according to a University of Illinois at Chicago study.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-islet-transplant-atherosclerosis

HEART - Long-Term Outcomes Favor Heart Surgery Over Stents and Angioplasty

Patients who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery have a lower overall composite risk for heart attack, stroke, and death in the 4 years following the procedure compared to patients who undergo stenting or balloon procedures, according to a new study.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129074422.ht

HEART - MRI-friendly defibrillator implant opens doors for thousands of cardiac patients currently denied MRIs

Every year an estimated 1.5 million magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are performed in Canada and the number is growing at a rate of about 10 per cent per year. At the same time, a soaring number of Canadians who rely on implanted defibrillators to keep their hearts beating are denied this valuable, life-saving diagnostic test despite a 50 to 75 per cent probability that they will require one over the lifetime of their defibrillator.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-mri-friendly-defibrillator-impla

HEART - Study clarifies antidepressant contribution to arrhythmia risk

A 2011 warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about the popular antidepressant citalopram (Celexa) left many patients and physicians with more questions than answers. Now an analysis of the medical records of more than 38,000 patients by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators clarifies the contribution of citalopram and other antidepressants to lengthening of the QT interval, an aspect of the heart's electrical activity that - when prolonged - may increase the risk of dangerous arrhythmias. The study supported the FDA's warning that higher doses of citalopram were associated with a prolonged QT interval but also found that the effects of some other antidepressants were quite different.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-antidepressant-contribution-arrh

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - New findings into conquering influenza

Reseachers from the University of Melbourne and The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) have discovered a new protein that protects against viral infections such as influenza.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-conquering-influenza.htm

LONGEVITY - Hydrogen sulfide: The next anti-aging agent?

Hydrogen sulfide may play a wide-ranging role in staving off aging, according to a new article. In this review article, a team from China explores the compound's plethora of potential anti-aging pathways.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129121945.ht

NEWS - 'Super' enzyme protects against dangers of oxygen

(Phys.org)-Just like a comic book super hero, you could say that the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1) has a secret identity. Since its discovery in 1969, scientists believed SOD1's only role was to protect living cells against damage from free radicals. Now, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered that SOD1 protects cells by regulating cell energy and metabolism. The results of their research were published January 17, 2013, in the journal Cell.

http://phys.org/news/2013-01-super-enzyme-dangers-oxygen.htm

NEWS - Cadavers honored in med student dissection lab

(AP)-When medical students have finished their study and practice on cadavers, they often hold a respectful memorial service to honor these bodies donated to science.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cadavers-honored-med-student-lab

NEWS - Dr. Oz And Mr. Hyde: What Medicine Should Learn From Mehmet

In the current issue of The New Yorker, Michael Specter, journalism's great chronicler of how we know what we know, profiles Mehmet Oz, the surgeon and TV star who Oprah herself sainted as "America's doctor." (Go read it now, then come back.) In the piece, Specter finds Oz both saving lives and promoting bunkum. Here are seven people, products, and ideas Specter catches Oz promoting that are absolutely, positively, wrong:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2013/01/29/dr-oz-and-mr-hyde

NEWS - Europe fends off alien species

To help decision makers mitigate the consequence of alien plant and animal invasion, an EU-wide database maintains a black list of these unwelcome biological invaders.

http://phys.org/news/2013-01-europe-fends-alien-species.htm

NEWS - FDA warns company over unapproved flu remedy

Federal regulators say a Florida company has been marketing an untested inhaled formula as a flu remedy in violation of drug safety regulations.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-fda-company-unapproved-flu-remed

NEWS - Genetics may explain severe flu in Chinese people

A genetic variant commonly found in Chinese people may help explain why some got seriously ill with swine flu, a discovery scientists say could help pinpoint why flu viruses hit some populations particularly hard and change how they are treated.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-genetics-severe-flu-chinese-peop

NEWS - More research into chronic diseases urgently needed in all countries

When considering chronic (non-communicable) diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, in low-and-middle countries, a major shift in approach from declaring what needs to be done to using research to prioritise, evaluate, monitor and improve health outcomes is urgently needed, according to international experts from London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine writing in this week's PLOS Medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-chronic-diseases-urgently-countr

NEWS - New drill-less technique may reduce kids' fear of the dentist

(Medical Xpress)-Children have been shown to significantly prefer a new way of treating tooth decay that doesn't involve needles or drills.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-drill-less-technique-kids-dentis

NEWS - No proof drugs ease kids' migraines, study says

(HealthDay)-Children and teens who get migraine headaches suffer in multiple ways, missing school and fun time with friends while waiting for the debilitating pain to subside.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-proof-drugs-ease-kids-migraines.

NEWS - Scientists discover potential new target in fight against 'superbug'

University of Cambridge researchers have discovered how an antibiotic-resistant superbug exploits oxygen-limited conditions in the lungs of patients with severe respiratory disease to thrive.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-scientists-potential-superbug.ht

NEWS - Soldier looks forward to driving with new arms (Update)

A U.S. soldier who lost all four limbs in a roadside bombing in Iraq says he's looking forward to driving and swimming with new arms after undergoing a double-arm transplant.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-soldier-rare-double-arm-transpla

NEWS - Study shows climate change could affect onset and severity of flu seasons

The American public can expect to add earlier and more severe flu seasons to the fallout from climate change, according to a research study published online Jan. 28 in PLOS Currents: Influenza.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-climate-affect-onset-severity-fl

NEWS - Telephone physiotherapy reduces waiting times and provides equally good patient results

A physiotherapy service based on initial telephone assessment has the ability to provide faster access to the service and cut waiting times, a study published today in BMJ suggests.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-physiotherapy-equally-good-patie

NEWS - Tomorrow's life-saving medications may currently be living at the bottom of the sea

OHSU researchers, in partnership with scientists from several other institutions, have published two new research papers that signal how the next class of powerful medications may currently reside at the bottom of the ocean. In both cases, the researchers were focused on ocean-based mollusks - a category of animal that includes snails, clams and squid and their bacterial companions.

http://phys.org/news/2013-01-tomorrow-life-saving-medications-bottom-s

NEWS - UN agency warns of new global bird flu threat

The UN food agency on Tuesday warned the world risked a surge in bird flu outbreaks unless countries strengthen their monitoring against dangerous animal diseases despite economic hardship.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-agency-global-bird-flu-threat.ht

NEWS-CANCER - British 'stiff upper lip' may prevent early presentation for cancer symptoms

Embarrassment and not wanting to waste their doctors' time are more frequently reported by British people than in other countries, according to new research led jointly by King's College London and UCL (University College London). This may be holding British people back from presenting early with symptoms of cancer.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-british-stiff-upper-lip-early.ht

NEWS-CANCER - Cancer death rates over a third higher in men than women

Men are over 35 per cent more likely to die from cancer than women in the UK, according to a new report released today .

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cancer-death-higher-men-women.ht

NEWS-CANCER - Eating deep-fried food associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, study finds

Regular consumption of deep-fried foods such as French fries, fried chicken and doughnuts is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, and the effect appears to be slightly stronger with regard to more aggressive forms of the disease, according to a study by investigators at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-deep-fried-food-prostate-cancer.

NEWS-CANCER - New Study Shows How Stress Feeds Cancer Cells

For years we've heard that there's a connection between stress and cancer. The claim is anecdotal, but has a certain horse sense that appeals to reason -- stress is hard on the body, causing hormonal reactions that can potentially influence the development of cancerous cells.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/01/29/new-study-shows-ho

PSYCHOLOGY - 'Moral realism' may lead to better moral behavior

People who are primed with "moral realism" may be motivated to better moral behavior. Researchers assess the impact of meta-ethics on everyday decision-making in a new report.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129121939.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - Feeling flirty? Wait for the sun to shine

We all know how casual flirtation can lift one's mood, which can be important at this time of year when the winter blues are at their peak. But if you are more serious about your flirting and hope to get that all important phone number, you're better off waiting until it's sunny, according to new French research published in the journal Social Influence.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-flirty-sun.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - First ever UK based language tool to decode baby talk under development

A tool which could radically improve the diagnosis of language delays in infants in the UK is being developed by psychologists.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129130907.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - Power helps you live the good life by bringing you closer to your true self

How does being in a position of power at work, with friends, or in a romantic relationship influence well-being? While we might like to believe the stereotype that power leads to unhappiness or loneliness, new research indicates that this stereotype is largely untrue: Being in a position of power may actually make people happier.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-power-good-life-closer-true.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Rats, like humans, return to drinking once punishment is removed

Once heavy drinking impairs function, a variety of punishment-related threats may motivate people to stop drinking: spouses may threaten divorce, employers may threaten job loss, and courts threaten drunk drivers with losing their driver's license or incarceration. In the face of these threats, many alcohol abusers refrain from drinking, but relapse is very common when the threats of punishment fade, particularly when exposed to alcohol-associated environments (contexts).

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130082449.ht

SKIN - Messenger substance and signalling molecule influence the development of the skin's immune cells

A signalling molecule known as Axl has been discovered on immune cells of the epidermis. This recently published finding provides new insight into the development of important skin immune cells known as Langerhans cells. These cells fight off invading microorganisms and play a crucial role in our health. As the research project, funded by the Austrian Science Fund FWF, also discovered, the natural production of the signalling molecule Axl is highly dependent on the messenger substance TGF-beta 1. Together, these findings provide a better understanding of how immune cells develop and offer new approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-messenger-substance-molecule-ski

SKIN - Skin, soft tissue infections succumb to blue light

Blue light can selectively eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of the skin and soft tissues, while preserving the outermost layer of skin, according to a proof-of-principle study led by Michael R. Hamblin of the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Harvard Medical School, Boston. The research is published online ahead of print in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-skin-soft-tissue-infections-succ

SLEEP - Previously unknown sleep pattern revealed in new research

(Medical Xpress)-There's no need to panic if you didn't get a solid eight hours of beauty sleep last night. According to new University of Sydney research, sleep duration naturally waxes and wanes over a period of days regardless of individual lifestyle, timing of sleep or waking, and social and environmental influences.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-previously-unknown-pattern-revea

VITAMINS - Tomorrow's life-saving medications may currently be living at the bottom of the sea

Two new research articles demonstrate how the next class of powerful medications may currently reside at the bottom of the ocean. In both cases, the researchers were focused on ocean-based mollusks - a category of animal that includes snails, clams and squid and their bacterial companions.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129130949.ht

WEIGHT - In CAD, highest mortality risk for central obesity, normal BMI

(HealthDay)-For individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD), central obesity in combination with normal weight is associated with the highest risk of mortality, according to research published in the Feb. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-cad-highest-mortality-central-ob

WEIGHT - Obesity and its consequences spreading rapidly around the world

Clogged arteries and sedentary lifestyles have replaced germs as the world's leading killers. Where hunger once held much of the world in its grip, the 1.6 billion overweight and obese now outnumber the malnourished by nearly 2-to-1.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-obesity-consequences-rapidly-wor

HEALTH PORTATION News January 28th

BRAIN - AR glasses are proposed to restore depth perception
(Phys.org)-People with impaired depth perception might see better with augmented reality glasses according to a research initiative under way at the University of Yamanashi in Japan. The team involved are working with off the shelf goggles that are aimed at the "bionocularly challenged," referring to people who lack binocular depth perception. The glasses generate a feeling of depth in the partially sighted person's "good" eye via software especi ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-01-ar-glasses-depth-perception.htm

BRAIN - Cancer-causing virus found in brain shows potential connection to epilepsy
Researchers have evidence linking HPV16, the most common cause of cervical cancer, to a form of epilepsy. They've shown that HPV16 may be present in the human brain, and when they added a viral protein to the brains of fetal mice, the mice demonstrated the same developmental problems in the cerebral cortex associated with this type of epilepsy ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124123543.ht

BRAIN - Doctors aim to help stroke patients overcome disability by helping rewire their brains
Researchers at the University of Glasgow are hoping to help victims of stroke to overcome physical disabilities by helping their brains to 'rewire' themselves ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-doctors-aim-patients-d

BRAIN - Guidelines for brain amyloid imaging in Alzheimer's
To provide guidance for physicians, individuals and families affected by Alzheimer's, and the public, experts have published the first criteria for the appropriate use of this imaging technology to aid in the diagnosis of people with suspected Alzheimer's disease ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130128082916.ht

BRAIN - Neuroscientists pinpoint location of fear memory in amygdala
A rustle of undergrowth in the outback: it's a sound that might make an animal or person stop sharply and be still, in the anticipation of a predator. That "freezing" is part of the fear response, a reaction to a stimulus in the environment and part of the brain's determination of whether to be afraid of it ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-neuroscientists-memory


DIABETES - Can men prevent diabetes with testosterone boost?
Australian researchers have begun a world-first study that aims to help men lose weight and prevent diabetes - by giving them more testosterone ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124122932.ht


EXERCISE - Exercise can slow onset of Alzheimer's memory loss: Scientists identify link
Keeping active can slow down the progression of memory loss in people with Alzheimer's disease, a study has shown. Medical researchers have identified a stress hormone produced during moderate exercise that may protect the brain from memory changes related to the disease ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124123207.ht

EXERCISE - Lose fat faster before breakfast
People can burn up to 20% more body fat by exercising in the morning on an empty stomach, according to new research ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124091425.ht


FOODS - Cows fed flaxseed produce more nutritious dairy products
Dairy cows that are fed flaxseed produce more nutritious milk, with more omega-3 fatty acids and less saturated fat ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130126092720.ht

FOODS - Fewer people adding salt at the table
The number of people in England adding salt to food at the table fell by more than a quarter in the five years following a national campaign, according to research published in the British Journal of Nutrition ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-people-adding-salt-tab


HEART - Blood pressure, cholesterol most important indicators of heart disease risk in diabetics
For people with diabetes, meeting the recommended guidelines for blood pressure and cholesterol is even more important than meeting the guidelines for blood sugar control in reducing the risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-blood-pressure-cholest

HEART - Patients' skin cells transformed into heart cells to create 'disease in a dish'
Researchers use skin cells from patients with an inherited heart condition to recreate the adult-onset disease in a laboratory dish-producing the first maturation-based disease model for testing new therapies ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-patients-skin-cells-he


NEWS - 'Achilles heel' of key HIV replication protein found: Could potentially stop HIV from progressing to full-blown AIDS
Researchers may have found an "Achilles heel" in a key HIV protein. They showed that targeting this vulnerable spot could stop the virus from replicating, potentially thwarting HIV infection from progressing to full-blown AIDS ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124123451.ht

NEWS - 70 percent of Americans track their health, but most go low-tech
It may just be early adopter tech types who log every step they take or calorie they burn using Fitbits, Nike Fuelbands, and other devices, but that hardly means they're the only ones who track their health. About 7 in 10 American adults told the Pew Internet & American Life Project that they track a health indicator like weight, diet, exercise or a symptom. But despite growing buzz around the "quantified self" movement and the explosion of g ...
http://gigaom.com/2013/01/27/70-percent-of-americans-track-h

NEWS - AR glasses are proposed to restore depth perception
(Phys.org)-People with impaired depth perception might see better with augmented reality glasses according to a research initiative under way at the University of Yamanashi in Japan. The team involved are working with off the shelf goggles that are aimed at the "bionocularly challenged," referring to people who lack binocular depth perception. The glasses generate a feeling of depth in the partially sighted person's "good" eye via software especi ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-01-ar-glasses-depth-perception.htm

NEWS - Gatorade pulls 'fire retardant' additive
PepsiCo subsidiary Gatorade said Friday it was removing an ingredient from its popular citrus-flavored sports drink that has a second life as a fire retardant ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-gatorade-retardant-add

NEWS - Health apps abound, but usage low, study shows
US consumers are being offered a vast range of smartphone apps to track or manage health, but only a small number of people are using them, according to a survey ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-health-apps-abound-usa

NEWS - How the bacterium that plays role in spread of MRSA colonises the human nose
A collaboration between researchers at the School of Biochemistry and Immunology and the Department of Microbiology at Trinity College Dublin has identified a mechanism by which the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonises our nasal passages. The study, recently published in the prestigious journal PLOS Pathogens, shows for the first time that a protein located on the bacterial surface called clumping factor B (ClfB) recognises a pro ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-bacterium-role-mrsa-co

NEWS - Lead levels down in U.S. kids, but asthma cases rising
(HealthDay)-Lead levels in young children in the United States have declined dramatically in recent decades, according to government figures released Friday. But the new report on the environment and children's health also found a rise in asthma among kids ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-kids-asthma-cases.htm

NEWS - New way to battle bacteria
Scientists are developing a way to disrupt the process by which bacteria become virulent. The work could have widespread implications for human health ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130123133411.ht

NEWS - Penicillin, not the pill, may have launched the sexual revolution
The rise in risky, non-traditional sexual relations that marked the swinging '60s and advent of readily available contraception actually began as much as a decade earlier, during the conformist '50s, suggests a new analysis. The analysis strongly indicates that the widespread use of penicillin, leading to a rapid decline in syphilis during the 1950s, is what launched the modern sexual era ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130128082906.ht

NEWS - Research may lead to new strategies against sepsis
Scientists are closer to solving a long-standing mystery in sepsis, a complex, often life-threatening condition. By blocking the activity of a protein in cells that line blood vessels in mice, they have halted a cascade of cellular events that culminates in out-of-control inflammation, and protected lungs from damage. The findings provide new insights into molecular details underlying sepsis and its effects on lungs, and may lead to new treatment ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130125142201.ht

NEWS - Who Causes Half of Healthcare Costs?
A very small percentage of the patients in the healthcare system use up the bulk of the available dollars. Since I've written about quality of life vs. quality of death before, let's focus on what conditions are driving the costs so high and what, if anything, can be done about it ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelbell/2013/01/28/who-cause


NEWS-CANCER - DNA-repairing protein may be key to preventing recurrence of some cancers
Just as the body can become resistant to antibiotics, certain methods of killing cancer tumors can end up creating resistant tumor cells. But a University of Central Florida professor has found a protein present in several types of cancer, including breast and ovarian cancer, which could be helpful in preventing tumors from coming back ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-dna-repairing-protein-

NEWS-CANCER - Discovering the secrets of tumor growth
Scientists have identified a compound that blocks the expression of a protein without which certain tumors cannot grow. This compound has potential as an anticancer agent ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124123311.ht

NEWS-CANCER - New target for cancer therapy
The plasma membrane transporter SLC5A8 can inhibit the spread of tumours by decreasing the amount of the anti-apoptotic protein surviving in tumour cells ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124091536.ht

NEWS-CANCER - Researchers identify four distinct mechanisms that contribute to gastric cancers
Scientists at A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) headed a study that discovered four processes by which gastric cancer is formed. This is extremely important since gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide, claiming almost 750,000 lives annually, 60% of which are Asians ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-distinct-mechanisms-co


PSYCHOLOGY - Can you 'train' yourself to have more willpower?
Researchers say that with a little practice, it may be possible to strengthen and improve your self-control -- and lose more weight ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130124123545.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - How To Be Happier
http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eihm45lkmk/cmon-get-happy

PSYCHOLOGY - Memories and experiences make a piece of jewellery important for a woman, researcher finds
Women own and wear jewellery for the sake of others. Through their use of jewellery, women indicate belonging to a certain group, such as family or persons with a similar worldview or values. Jewellery is important for women, as it is associated with a number of significant memories and personal experiences ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-memories-piece-jewelle

PSYCHOLOGY - New hope for addicts
It doesn't take a rocket scientist to quickly grasp what a University of Mississippi professor's research could mean to the millions of people addicted to hardcore narcotics such as heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine and morphine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-addicts.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Panic attacks troubling, but treatable
Actress Amanda Seyfried says she undergoes therapy for them. They were a staple of the cable TV show "The Sopranos." And in probably the most high-profile occurrence of the past year, pro golfer Charlie Beljan had one on the second day of a tournament, completing the round but leaving the course in an ambulance ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-panic-treatable.htm


SKIN - Patients' own skin cells are transformed into heart cells to create 'disease in a dish'
Researchers have unveiled the first maturation-based "disease in a dish" model for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). The model was created using induced pluripotent stem cells and a new method to mimic metabolic maturity. This model is likely more relevant to human ARVD/C than other models and therefore better suited for studying the disease and testing new treatments ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130127134201.ht


SLEEP - Poor sleep in old age prevents the brain from storing memories
The connection between poor sleep, memory loss and brain deterioration as we grow older has been elusive. But for the first time, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have found a link between these hallmark maladies of old age. Their discovery opens the door to boosting the quality of sleep in elderly people to improve memory ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-poor-age-brain-memorie


WATER - Geothermal Power Plant Cost Potentially Reduced By 50%
Geothermal developers from AltaRock Energy, a Washington state-based company, have been working on creating geothermal reservoirs with their own technology. They have recently made three such reservoirs from a single well, which means there is a greater chance a commercial geothermal plant can be built because with more reservoirs there is greater flow and energy output for each well. With human-made reservoirs expanding the energy output, the .. ...
http://cleantechnica.com/2013/01/28/geothermal-power-plant-c