HEALTH PORTATION News February 27th

BRAIN - 'Network' analysis of the brain may explain features of autism
A look at how the brain processes information finds a distinct pattern in children with autism spectrum disorders. Using EEGs to track the brain's electrical cross-talk, researchers from Boston Children's Hospital have found a structural difference in brain connections. Compared with neurotypical children, those with autism have multiple redundant connections between neighboring brain areas at the expense of long-distance links ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-network-analysis-brain

BRAIN - A Young Doctor Fights The Depression Epidemic In Palestine
Forty percent of Palestinians are clinically depressed, a rate unmatched anywhere in the word. It's more than triple that of the U.S., ten times higher than in the U.K., and four to eight times higher than in Scandinavia, where the sun doesn't shine for a good part of the year. For Palestinian neuroscientist Mohammad Herzallah, this epidemic is an opportunity, if a tragic one, because it has made his country an ideal place to do groundbreaking re ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/bruceupbin/2013/02/27/a-young-do

BRAIN - Study shows human brain able to discriminate syllables three months prior to birth
(Medical Xpress)-A team of French researchers has discovered that the human brain is capable of distinguishing between different types of syllables as early as three months prior to full term birth. As they describe in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team found via brain scans that babies born up to three months premature are capable of some language processing ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-human-brain-discrimina

CHARTS - An atlas of the human heart is drawn using statistics
Researchers at Pompeu Fabra University (Spain) have created a high resolution atlas of the heart with 3D images taken from 138 people. The study demonstrates that an average image of an organ along with its variations can be obtained for the purposes of comparing individual cases and differentiating healthy forms from pathologies ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-atlas-human-heart-draw

DIABETES - Breakthrough camera to improve detection of blinding eye disease and diabetes
The most advanced technology for use in real-time detection and assessment of common blinding eye disease and general health disorders will soon be available to the world with stimulus funding provided for development by the Australian Government's CRC Program. The imaging technology of the breakthrough retinal camera is being developed by the Vision Cooperative Research Centre (Vision CRC) based in Sydney with international partners in Australia ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-breakthrough-camera-ey

DIABETES - Immune intervention reduces beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes
(HealthDay)-Patients recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have greater death of pancreatic β-cells compared with patients with long-standing diabetes, which can be reduced by treatment with teplizumab, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Diabetes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-immune-intervention-be

DIABETES - Patients with diabetes at no greater risk for infection
Patients with diabetes were no more likely to suffer infection, deep vein thrombosis (a deep vein blood clot) or other complications following total knee replacement (TKR) than patients without diabetes, according to new research published online today, in advance of its publication in the March 2013 Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-patients-diabetes-grea

DIGESTION - Eat too much? Maybe it's in the blood
Bone marrow cells that produce brain-derived eurotrophic factor (BDNF), known to affect regulation of food intake, travel to part of the hypothalamus in the brain where they "fine-tune" appetite, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Shiga University of Medical Science in Otsu, Shiga, Japan, in a report that appears online in the journal Nature Communications ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-blood.htm

DIGESTION - Good bacteria may expunge vancomycin-resistant bacteria from your gut
Too much antibiotic can decimate the normal intestinal microbiota, which may never recover its former diversity. That, in turn, renders the GI tract vulnerable to being colonized by pathogens. Now researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, and Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública, Valencia, Spain, show that reintroducing normal microbial diversity largely eliminated vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-good-bacteria-expunge-

FOODS - Contaminated diet contributes to phthalate and bisphenol A exposure
While water bottles may tout BPA-free labels and personal care products declare phthalates not among their ingredients, these assurances may not be enough. According to a study published February 27 in the Nature's Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, people may be exposed to these chemicals in their diets, even if their meals are organic and foods are prepared, cooked and stored in non-plastic containers. And children may ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-contaminated-diet-cont

FOODS - Fake concrete-filled walnuts being sold in China (Video)
Some vendors in China are selling walnuts -- filled with concrete nuggets -- to make larger profits ...
http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/fake-concrete-filled-wa

FOODS - First lady announces healthy recipe search effort
(AP)-Michelle Obama says five media companies and a social media website are working together to make it easier to find nutritious recipes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-lady-healthy-recipe-ef

FOODS - Food banks addressing obesity with nutrition-related policies
Food banks are altering their nutrition-related policies and practices to address concerns about the rise in obesity and diet-related diseases among individuals struggling to afford food, according to a study by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. The study, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, examines these strategies and identifies the challenges and opportunities related to their implementation ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-food-banks-obesity-nut

FOODS - Fresh bread without preservatives?
A Canadian researcher's bread breakthough could lead to natural crop protection as well as better brea ...
http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-agriculture/fresh-brea

FOODS - Russia finds horsemeat in sausages
Russia said Wednesday it had found horsemeat in a shipment of pork sausages imported from Austria in its first known case of horsemeat contamination as the scandal spread further across Europe ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-russia-horsemeat-sausa

FOODS - Should caffeine be a regulated substance?
Caffeine-related toxicity, deaths, and near-deaths are an undeniable fact. In Sweden, for example, four people died as a result of confirmed caffeine-related causes in one year. Yet caffeine use continues to grow, including among young people, as it is increasingly added to a variety of drinks, foods, and weight-loss and other commonly used products ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-caffeine-substance.htm

FOODS - The Paleo Diet
http://www.forbes.com/pictures/ehjh45higm/the-paleo-diet

FOODS - Whole grains, rather than dietary fibre, found to be fundamental to the prevention of chronic disease
The apparent links between various food types and the prevention of chronic diseases - such as type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD) and hypertension - are well established. In particular, dietary fibre has long been regarded as a powerful means of reducing health risks. However, this study finds that it is not fibre, but whole grain cereals specifically, which prevent chronic disease ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-grains-dietary-fibre-f

HEART - An atlas of the human heart is drawn using statistics
Researchers at Pompeu Fabra University (Spain) have created a high resolution atlas of the heart with 3D images taken from 138 people. The study demonstrates that an average image of an organ along with its variations can be obtained for the purposes of comparing individual cases and differentiating healthy forms from pathologies ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-atlas-human-heart-draw

HEART - If You Eat the Mediterranean Way, Can You Drop Your Heart Meds?
Earlier this week, results from a massive study on the benefits of the Mediterranean diet were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study--which lasted five years and included 7,500 participants ages 55-80--was a triumph for the Med diet, but there are a few important caveats to consider ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/02/26/if-you-e

HEART - Manchester patients take part in pioneering heart attack blood test trial
High levels of a chemical called troponin in the blood can indicate a heart attack. A new, highly sensitive blood test for troponin will be used on blood samples donated by 140 patients who were admitted to MRI with chest pains. The results of the new blood test will be compared with the actual diagnosis for each patient to show the effectiveness of the test ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-manchester-patients-he

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Viruses can have immune systems, new research shows
A study published today in the journal Nature reports that a viral predator of the cholera bacteria has stolen the functional immune system of bacteria and is using it against its bacterial host. The study provides the first evidence that this type of virus, the bacteriophage ("phage" for short), can acquire a wholly functional and adaptive immune system ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-02-viruses-immune.htm

LONGEVITY - 114-year-old Japanese woman named world's oldest
A 114-year-old Japanese woman was recognised on Wednesday as the world's oldest female, making the Asian nation home to the longest-living woman and man on the planet ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-year-old-japanese-woma

LONGEVITY - Defining the new normal in aging
Diana McIntyre approaches her 80th birthday later this year with the same energy and zest for life of friends decades her junior. Aside from back surgery years ago, she's never been sick and, through a busy volunteer schedule, never seems to slow down ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-aging.htm

LONGEVITY - No genetic clock for neuron longevity
(Medical Xpress)-People are living longer than ever before, thanks to medical and technological advances. Unfortunately, aging can be associated with a decrease in brain function. This is because, unlike other cells in the body, neurons do not replicate. Neuroscientists in Italy have extended the lives of mouse neurons by injecting them into the brains of longer-lived rats, according to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy o ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-genetic-clock-neuron-l

LONGEVITY - Pessimism about the future may lead to longer, healthier life, research finds
Older people who have low expectations for a satisfying future may be more likely to live longer, healthier lives than those who see brighter days ahead, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-pessimism-future-longe

NEWS - ACR releases five 'Don'ts' for rheumatologists
(HealthDay)-As part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has issued a list of the top five tests and treatments commonly misordered by rheumatologists; the list has been published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-acr-donts-rheumatologi

NEWS - Biting back: Snake venom contains toxic clotting factors
The powerful venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus contains both anticoagulants and coagulants finds a study published in the launch edition of BioMed Central's open access journal Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases (JVATiTD). These may be a source of potent drugs to treat human disease ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-02-snake-venom-toxic-clotting-fact

NEWS - Blood vessels 'sniff' gut microbes to regulate blood pressure
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and Yale University have discovered that a specialized receptor, normally found in the nose, is also in blood vessels throughout the body, sensing small molecules created by microbes that line mammalian intestines, and responding to these molecules by increasing blood pressure. The finding suggests that gut bacteria are an integral part of the body's complex system for maintaining a stable blood pressur ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-blood-vessels-gut-micr

NEWS - Exposure to hepatitis B virus activates immunity in young people, suggesting benefits for earlier treatment
Infectious disease experts have long thought that children, teenagers and young adults who are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) lack the immune cells needed to fight this pathogen. As such, physicians currently withhold therapeutic interventions from younger patients until they have reached an advanced age-typically around 30 years old-at which time the immune system is thought to have 'awakened' to the virus ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-exposure-hepatitis-vir

NEWS - Promising breakthrough for transplant patients
A team led by Dr. Marie-Josée Hébert from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has discovered a new cause of organ rejection in some kidney transplant patients. Her team has identified a new class of antibodies - anti-LG3 - which when activated lead to severe rejection episodes associated with a high rate of organ loss. This discovery, which holds promise for organ recipients, was published in the online version of the A ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-breakthrough-transplan

NEWS - Research suggests malaria can be defeated without a globally led eradication program
A researcher at the University of Southampton, working as part of a team from the UK and USA, believes the global eradication of malaria could be achieved by individual countries eliminating the disease within their own borders and coordinating efforts regionally. The team's findings have been published in the journal Science ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-malaria-defeated-globa

NEWS - Study shows bariatric surgery restores pancreatic function by targeting belly fat
In a substudy of the STAMPEDE trial (Surgical Therapy And Medications Potentially Eradicate Diabetes Efficiently), Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that gastric bypass surgery reverses diabetes by uniquely restoring pancreatic function in moderately obese patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-bariatric-surgery-panc

NEWS - Swine cells could power artificial liver
Chronic or acute, liver failure can be deadly. Toxins take over, the skin turns yellow and higher brain function slows ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-swine-cells-power-arti

NEWS - Tackling hearing loss
Some 16 per cent of European adults suffer from hearing loss that is severe enough to adversely affect their daily life. Hearing loss impacts on one's ability to communicate - to hear, process sound, and respond - which can make life frustrating. Untreated hearing loss can discourage social interaction, leading to depression, anxiety and isolation from the rest of the world. Sufferers also tend to express greater dissatisfaction with friendships, ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-tackling-loss.htm

NEWS - The brakes of inflammation
In the last few decades, sci­en­tists have come to attribute an immuno­log­ical expla­na­tion to many can­cers. It is now thought that tumors rise up rou­tinely in the body but that a healthy immune system blocks their devel­op­ment. Thus, for patients who do develop cancer, the immune system is par­tially to blame ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-inflammation.htm

NEWS - The great orchestral work of speech
What goes on inside our heads is similar to an orchestra. For Peter Hagoort, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, this image is a very apt one for explaining how speech arises in the human brain. "There are different orchestra members and different instruments, all playing in time with each other, and sounding perfect together. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-great-orchestral-speec

NEWS - Vt. lye victim gets new face at Boston hospital (Update)
A Vermont nurse disfigured in a 2007 lye attack has received a new face at a Boston hospital ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-vt-lye-victim-boston-h

NEWS - Where There's Smoke, There's Fire: A Call to Action for Better Indoor Air Pollution Research
Editor's note: Donn Tice is Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of d.light ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/skollworldforum/2013/02/26/where

NEWS-CANCER - Cell sugar concentrations affect hyaluronan production and cancer growth
According to a recent University of Eastern Finland (UEF) study, elevated cell sugar concentrations increase the production of hyaluronan which, in turn, promotes cancer growth. Regulating the production of hyaluronan may be a way to prevent the spreading of cancer ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cell-sugar-affect-hyal

NEWS-CANCER - First study ever to analyze 25 years of data after radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients
The March 2013 issue of The Journal of Urology, the official journal of The American Urological Association, includes a study conducted by four physicians from Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia (RCOG), a Vantage Oncology affiliate. This study, 25 Year Disease Free Survival Rate after Irradiation of Prostate Cancer Calculated with the Prostate Specific Antigen Definition of Recurrence Used for Radical Prostatectomy, is the first-ever to analyze 25 y ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-years-therapy-prostate

PSYCHOLOGY - Medical myth: Stress can turn hair grey overnight
The belief that nervous shock can cause you to go grey overnight (medically termed canities subita) is one of those tales which could nearly be true. There are certainly cases in medical literature of rapid greying over quite short periods of time. And reported cases go back to antiquity including such legendary figures as Thomas More and Marie Antoinette ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-medical-myth-stress-ha

PSYCHOLOGY - Neuroscience shows why not everyone learns from their mistakes
(Medical Xpress)-Some people do not learn from their mistakes because of the way their brain works, according to research led by an academic at Goldsmiths, University of London ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-neuroscience.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - New studies link gene to selfish behavior in kids, find other children natural givers
(Medical Xpress)-Most parents would agree that raising a generous child is an admirable goal-but how, exactly, is that accomplished? New results from the University of Notre Dame's Science of Generosity initiative, which funds generosity research around the world, sheds light on how generosity and related behaviors-such as kindness, caring and empathy-develop, or don't develop, in children from 2 years old through adolescence ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-link-gene-selfish-beha

SKIN - New study opens door to multipronged attack against skin common cancer
Hailed as a major step forward in the effort to develop targeted cancer therapies, a recently approved drug for the most common type of skin cancer has been a mixed blessing for patients. Although the initial response is usually dramatic, the tumors often recur as the cancer becomes resistant to treatment ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-door-multipronged-skin

SLEEP - Infographic: Sleepless in America
The infographic below from termlifeinsurance.org does a nice job of summarizing the many problems associated with not getting enough sleep ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/02/26/infograp

VITAMINS - Coming Attraction: First Look At What Went Wrong With Niacin
In a few weeks, on March 9, the main results of the HPS2-THRIVE (Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events) study will be presented in San Francisco at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology. These results have been eagerly awaited since Merck's brief announcement in December that the trial had not met its primary endpoint and that it would no longer pursue approval of Tredaptive, t ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryhusten/2013/02/27/coming-at

VITAMINS - Study indicates link between high vitamin D levels in expectant mothers and increased infant allergy risks
Pregnant women should avoid taking vitamin D supplements. Substitution appears to raise the risk of children developing a food allergy after birth. This was the conclusion drawn from a new survey carried out by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the Martin Luther University in Halle-Wittenberg in Germany which was published in the February issue of the medical journal Allergy ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-link-high-vitamin-d-mo

BRAIN - 'Network' analysis of the brain may explain features of autism

A look at how the brain processes information finds a distinct pattern in children with autism spectrum disorders. Using EEGs to track the brain's electrical cross-talk, researchers from Boston Children's Hospital have found a structural difference in brain connections. Compared with neurotypical children, those with autism have multiple redundant connections between neighboring brain areas at the expense of long-distance links.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-network-analysis-brain-features-

BRAIN - A Young Doctor Fights The Depression Epidemic In Palestine

Forty percent of Palestinians are clinically depressed, a rate unmatched anywhere in the word. It's more than triple that of the U.S., ten times higher than in the U.K., and four to eight times higher than in Scandinavia, where the sun doesn't shine for a good part of the year. For Palestinian neuroscientist Mohammad Herzallah, this epidemic is an opportunity, if a tragic one, because it has made his country an ideal place to do groundbreaking research into the effects of depression on the brain.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/bruceupbin/2013/02/27/a-young-doctor-fight

BRAIN - Study shows human brain able to discriminate syllables three months prior to birth

(Medical Xpress)-A team of French researchers has discovered that the human brain is capable of distinguishing between different types of syllables as early as three months prior to full term birth. As they describe in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team found via brain scans that babies born up to three months premature are capable of some language processing.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-human-brain-discriminate-syllabl

CHARTS - An atlas of the human heart is drawn using statistics

Researchers at Pompeu Fabra University (Spain) have created a high resolution atlas of the heart with 3D images taken from 138 people. The study demonstrates that an average image of an organ along with its variations can be obtained for the purposes of comparing individual cases and differentiating healthy forms from pathologies.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-atlas-human-heart-drawn-statisti

DIABETES - Breakthrough camera to improve detection of blinding eye disease and diabetes

The most advanced technology for use in real-time detection and assessment of common blinding eye disease and general health disorders will soon be available to the world with stimulus funding provided for development by the Australian Government's CRC Program. The imaging technology of the breakthrough retinal camera is being developed by the Vision Cooperative Research Centre (Vision CRC) based in Sydney with international partners in Australia, US, China, India and Africa.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-breakthrough-camera-eye-disease-

DIABETES - Immune intervention reduces beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes

(HealthDay)-Patients recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have greater death of pancreatic β-cells compared with patients with long-standing diabetes, which can be reduced by treatment with teplizumab, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Diabetes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-immune-intervention-beta-cell-de

DIABETES - Patients with diabetes at no greater risk for infection

Patients with diabetes were no more likely to suffer infection, deep vein thrombosis (a deep vein blood clot) or other complications following total knee replacement (TKR) than patients without diabetes, according to new research published online today, in advance of its publication in the March 2013 Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-patients-diabetes-greater-infect

DIGESTION - Eat too much? Maybe it's in the blood

Bone marrow cells that produce brain-derived eurotrophic factor (BDNF), known to affect regulation of food intake, travel to part of the hypothalamus in the brain where they "fine-tune" appetite, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Shiga University of Medical Science in Otsu, Shiga, Japan, in a report that appears online in the journal Nature Communications.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-blood.htm

DIGESTION - Good bacteria may expunge vancomycin-resistant bacteria from your gut

Too much antibiotic can decimate the normal intestinal microbiota, which may never recover its former diversity. That, in turn, renders the GI tract vulnerable to being colonized by pathogens. Now researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, and Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública, Valencia, Spain, show that reintroducing normal microbial diversity largely eliminated vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) from the intestinal tracts of mice. The investigators showed further that the findings may apply to humans. The research is published in the March 2013 issue of the journal Infection and Immunity.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-good-bacteria-expunge-vancomycin

FOODS - Contaminated diet contributes to phthalate and bisphenol A exposure

While water bottles may tout BPA-free labels and personal care products declare phthalates not among their ingredients, these assurances may not be enough. According to a study published February 27 in the Nature's Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, people may be exposed to these chemicals in their diets, even if their meals are organic and foods are prepared, cooked and stored in non-plastic containers. And children may be most vulnerable.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-contaminated-diet-contributes-ph

FOODS - Fake concrete-filled walnuts being sold in China (Video)

Some vendors in China are selling walnuts -- filled with concrete nuggets -- to make larger profits.

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/fake-concrete-filled-walnuts-sold

FOODS - First lady announces healthy recipe search effort

(AP)-Michelle Obama says five media companies and a social media website are working together to make it easier to find nutritious recipes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-lady-healthy-recipe-effort.htm

FOODS - Food banks addressing obesity with nutrition-related policies

Food banks are altering their nutrition-related policies and practices to address concerns about the rise in obesity and diet-related diseases among individuals struggling to afford food, according to a study by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. The study, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, examines these strategies and identifies the challenges and opportunities related to their implementation.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-food-banks-obesity-nutrition-rel

FOODS - Fresh bread without preservatives?

A Canadian researcher's bread breakthough could lead to natural crop protection as well as better bread

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-agriculture/fresh-bread-without-

FOODS - Russia finds horsemeat in sausages

Russia said Wednesday it had found horsemeat in a shipment of pork sausages imported from Austria in its first known case of horsemeat contamination as the scandal spread further across Europe.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-russia-horsemeat-sausages.htm

FOODS - Should caffeine be a regulated substance?

Caffeine-related toxicity, deaths, and near-deaths are an undeniable fact. In Sweden, for example, four people died as a result of confirmed caffeine-related causes in one year. Yet caffeine use continues to grow, including among young people, as it is increasingly added to a variety of drinks, foods, and weight-loss and other commonly used products.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-caffeine-substance.htm

FOODS - The Paleo Diet

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/ehjh45higm/the-paleo-diet

FOODS - Whole grains, rather than dietary fibre, found to be fundamental to the prevention of chronic disease

The apparent links between various food types and the prevention of chronic diseases - such as type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD) and hypertension - are well established. In particular, dietary fibre has long been regarded as a powerful means of reducing health risks. However, this study finds that it is not fibre, but whole grain cereals specifically, which prevent chronic disease.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-grains-dietary-fibre-fundamental

HEART - An atlas of the human heart is drawn using statistics

Researchers at Pompeu Fabra University (Spain) have created a high resolution atlas of the heart with 3D images taken from 138 people. The study demonstrates that an average image of an organ along with its variations can be obtained for the purposes of comparing individual cases and differentiating healthy forms from pathologies.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-atlas-human-heart-drawn-statisti

HEART - If You Eat the Mediterranean Way, Can You Drop Your Heart Meds?

Earlier this week, results from a massive study on the benefits of the Mediterranean diet were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study--which lasted five years and included 7,500 participants ages 55-80--was a triumph for the Med diet, but there are a few important caveats to consider.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/02/26/if-you-eat-the-med

HEART - Manchester patients take part in pioneering heart attack blood test trial

High levels of a chemical called troponin in the blood can indicate a heart attack. A new, highly sensitive blood test for troponin will be used on blood samples donated by 140 patients who were admitted to MRI with chest pains. The results of the new blood test will be compared with the actual diagnosis for each patient to show the effectiveness of the test.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-manchester-patients-heart-blood-

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Viruses can have immune systems, new research shows

A study published today in the journal Nature reports that a viral predator of the cholera bacteria has stolen the functional immune system of bacteria and is using it against its bacterial host. The study provides the first evidence that this type of virus, the bacteriophage ("phage" for short), can acquire a wholly functional and adaptive immune system.

http://phys.org/news/2013-02-viruses-immune.htm

LONGEVITY - 114-year-old Japanese woman named world's oldest

A 114-year-old Japanese woman was recognised on Wednesday as the world's oldest female, making the Asian nation home to the longest-living woman and man on the planet.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-year-old-japanese-woman-world-ol

LONGEVITY - Defining the new normal in aging

Diana McIntyre approaches her 80th birthday later this year with the same energy and zest for life of friends decades her junior. Aside from back surgery years ago, she's never been sick and, through a busy volunteer schedule, never seems to slow down.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-aging.htm

LONGEVITY - No genetic clock for neuron longevity

(Medical Xpress)-People are living longer than ever before, thanks to medical and technological advances. Unfortunately, aging can be associated with a decrease in brain function. This is because, unlike other cells in the body, neurons do not replicate. Neuroscientists in Italy have extended the lives of mouse neurons by injecting them into the brains of longer-lived rats, according to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This indicates that neuronal lifespan is not predetermined, but depends on conditions in the microenvironment.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-genetic-clock-neuron-longevity.h

LONGEVITY - Pessimism about the future may lead to longer, healthier life, research finds

Older people who have low expectations for a satisfying future may be more likely to live longer, healthier lives than those who see brighter days ahead, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-pessimism-future-longer-healthie

NEWS - ACR releases five 'Don'ts' for rheumatologists

(HealthDay)-As part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has issued a list of the top five tests and treatments commonly misordered by rheumatologists; the list has been published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-acr-donts-rheumatologists.htm

NEWS - Biting back: Snake venom contains toxic clotting factors

The powerful venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus contains both anticoagulants and coagulants finds a study published in the launch edition of BioMed Central's open access journal Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases (JVATiTD). These may be a source of potent drugs to treat human disease.

http://phys.org/news/2013-02-snake-venom-toxic-clotting-factors.htm

NEWS - Blood vessels 'sniff' gut microbes to regulate blood pressure

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and Yale University have discovered that a specialized receptor, normally found in the nose, is also in blood vessels throughout the body, sensing small molecules created by microbes that line mammalian intestines, and responding to these molecules by increasing blood pressure. The finding suggests that gut bacteria are an integral part of the body's complex system for maintaining a stable blood pressure.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-blood-vessels-gut-microbes-press

NEWS - Exposure to hepatitis B virus activates immunity in young people, suggesting benefits for earlier treatment

Infectious disease experts have long thought that children, teenagers and young adults who are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) lack the immune cells needed to fight this pathogen. As such, physicians currently withhold therapeutic interventions from younger patients until they have reached an advanced age-typically around 30 years old-at which time the immune system is thought to have 'awakened' to the virus.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-exposure-hepatitis-virus-immunit

NEWS - Promising breakthrough for transplant patients

A team led by Dr. Marie-Josée Hébert from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has discovered a new cause of organ rejection in some kidney transplant patients. Her team has identified a new class of antibodies - anti-LG3 - which when activated lead to severe rejection episodes associated with a high rate of organ loss. This discovery, which holds promise for organ recipients, was published in the online version of the American Journal of Transplantation.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-breakthrough-transplant-patients

NEWS - Research suggests malaria can be defeated without a globally led eradication program

A researcher at the University of Southampton, working as part of a team from the UK and USA, believes the global eradication of malaria could be achieved by individual countries eliminating the disease within their own borders and coordinating efforts regionally. The team's findings have been published in the journal Science.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-malaria-defeated-globally-eradic

NEWS - Study shows bariatric surgery restores pancreatic function by targeting belly fat

In a substudy of the STAMPEDE trial (Surgical Therapy And Medications Potentially Eradicate Diabetes Efficiently), Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that gastric bypass surgery reverses diabetes by uniquely restoring pancreatic function in moderately obese patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-bariatric-surgery-pancreatic-fun

NEWS - Swine cells could power artificial liver

Chronic or acute, liver failure can be deadly. Toxins take over, the skin turns yellow and higher brain function slows.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-swine-cells-power-artificial-liv

NEWS - Tackling hearing loss

Some 16 per cent of European adults suffer from hearing loss that is severe enough to adversely affect their daily life. Hearing loss impacts on one's ability to communicate - to hear, process sound, and respond - which can make life frustrating. Untreated hearing loss can discourage social interaction, leading to depression, anxiety and isolation from the rest of the world. Sufferers also tend to express greater dissatisfaction with friendships, family life, health and finances. Depression is common in older adults who have trouble hearing.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-tackling-loss.htm

NEWS - The brakes of inflammation

In the last few decades, sci­en­tists have come to attribute an immuno­log­ical expla­na­tion to many can­cers. It is now thought that tumors rise up rou­tinely in the body but that a healthy immune system blocks their devel­op­ment. Thus, for patients who do develop cancer, the immune system is par­tially to blame.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-inflammation.htm

NEWS - The great orchestral work of speech

What goes on inside our heads is similar to an orchestra. For Peter Hagoort, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, this image is a very apt one for explaining how speech arises in the human brain. "There are different orchestra members and different instruments, all playing in time with each other, and sounding perfect together."

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-great-orchestral-speech.htm

NEWS - Vt. lye victim gets new face at Boston hospital (Update)

A Vermont nurse disfigured in a 2007 lye attack has received a new face at a Boston hospital.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-vt-lye-victim-boston-hospital.ht

NEWS - Where There's Smoke, There's Fire: A Call to Action for Better Indoor Air Pollution Research

Editor's note: Donn Tice is Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of d.light.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/skollworldforum/2013/02/26/where-theres-sm

NEWS-CANCER - Cell sugar concentrations affect hyaluronan production and cancer growth

According to a recent University of Eastern Finland (UEF) study, elevated cell sugar concentrations increase the production of hyaluronan which, in turn, promotes cancer growth. Regulating the production of hyaluronan may be a way to prevent the spreading of cancer.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cell-sugar-affect-hyaluronan-pro

NEWS-CANCER - First study ever to analyze 25 years of data after radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

The March 2013 issue of The Journal of Urology, the official journal of The American Urological Association, includes a study conducted by four physicians from Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia (RCOG), a Vantage Oncology affiliate. This study, 25 Year Disease Free Survival Rate after Irradiation of Prostate Cancer Calculated with the Prostate Specific Antigen Definition of Recurrence Used for Radical Prostatectomy, is the first-ever to analyze 25 years of follow-up data after radiation therapy treatment for prostate cancer patients.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-years-therapy-prostate-cancer-pa

PSYCHOLOGY - Medical myth: Stress can turn hair grey overnight

The belief that nervous shock can cause you to go grey overnight (medically termed canities subita) is one of those tales which could nearly be true. There are certainly cases in medical literature of rapid greying over quite short periods of time. And reported cases go back to antiquity including such legendary figures as Thomas More and Marie Antoinette.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-medical-myth-stress-hair-greyove

PSYCHOLOGY - Neuroscience shows why not everyone learns from their mistakes

(Medical Xpress)-Some people do not learn from their mistakes because of the way their brain works, according to research led by an academic at Goldsmiths, University of London.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-neuroscience.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - New studies link gene to selfish behavior in kids, find other children natural givers

(Medical Xpress)-Most parents would agree that raising a generous child is an admirable goal-but how, exactly, is that accomplished? New results from the University of Notre Dame's Science of Generosity initiative, which funds generosity research around the world, sheds light on how generosity and related behaviors-such as kindness, caring and empathy-develop, or don't develop, in children from 2 years old through adolescence.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-link-gene-selfish-behavior-kids.

SKIN - New study opens door to multipronged attack against skin common cancer

Hailed as a major step forward in the effort to develop targeted cancer therapies, a recently approved drug for the most common type of skin cancer has been a mixed blessing for patients. Although the initial response is usually dramatic, the tumors often recur as the cancer becomes resistant to treatment.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-door-multipronged-skin-common-ca

SLEEP - Infographic: Sleepless in America

The infographic below from termlifeinsurance.org does a nice job of summarizing the many problems associated with not getting enough sleep.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/02/26/infographic-sleepl

VITAMINS - Coming Attraction: First Look At What Went Wrong With Niacin

In a few weeks, on March 9, the main results of the HPS2-THRIVE (Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events) study will be presented in San Francisco at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology. These results have been eagerly awaited since Merck's brief announcement in December that the trial had not met its primary endpoint and that it would no longer pursue approval of Tredaptive, the combination of extended-release niacin and laropiprant, in the US. The trial was designed to assess whether adding the niacin/laropiprant combination to standard statin therapy in high risk individuals would further reduce vascular events.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryhusten/2013/02/27/coming-attraction-f

VITAMINS - Study indicates link between high vitamin D levels in expectant mothers and increased infant allergy risks

Pregnant women should avoid taking vitamin D supplements. Substitution appears to raise the risk of children developing a food allergy after birth. This was the conclusion drawn from a new survey carried out by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the Martin Luther University in Halle-Wittenberg in Germany which was published in the February issue of the medical journal Allergy.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-link-high-vitamin-d-mothers.htm

HEALTH PORTATION News February 25th

BRAIN - Ability of brain to protect itself from damage revealed
The origin of an innate ability the brain has to protect itself from damage that occurs in stroke has been explained for the first time. Researchers hope that harnessing this inbuilt biological mechanism, identified in rats, could help in treating stroke and preventing other neurodegenerative diseases in the future ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130224142823.ht

BRAIN - Ability of brain to protect itself from damage revealed
The origin of an innate ability the brain has to protect itself from damage that occurs in stroke has been explained for the first time ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-ability-brain-revealed

BRAIN - FDA panel backs brain stimulator for epilepsy
(HealthDay News) - A U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel has unanimously backed a device that lowers the rate of seizures among people with epilepsy ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-fda-panel-brain-epilep

BRAIN - Pain from the brain: Diseases formerly known as 'hysterical' illnesses
Psychogenic diseases, formerly known as "hysterical" illnesses, can have many severe symptoms such as painful cramps or paralysis, but without any physical explanation. However, new research suggests that individuals with psychogenic disease, that is to say physical illness that stems from emotional or mental stresses, do have brains that function differently ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225092250.ht

BRAIN - Researchers outline non-invasive method for detecting brain tumours by utilizing spectral texture features of MRI
Recent statistics showed that five percent of Malaysians have been diagnosed with brain tumours with glioma being the most common type. Radiologists commonly use MRI image sequences to detect glioma clinically by examining the abnormalities on T1-Weighted, T2-Weighted and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images. However, when the tumour cannot be detected visually, they will inject a contrast agent of gadolinium to enhance the image mo ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-outline-non-invasive-m

BRAIN - Scientists find way to image brain waste removal process, may lead to Alzheimer's diagnostic
(Medical Xpress)-A novel way to image the entire brain's glymphatic pathway, a dynamic process that clears waste and solutes from the brain that otherwise might build-up and contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease, may provide the basis for a new strategy to evaluate disease susceptibility, according to a research paper published online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Through contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MR ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-scientists-image-brain

BRAIN - Scientists pinpoint how deep brain stimulation eases OCD
(HealthDay)-Deep brain stimulation has helped people with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder, and new research begins to explain why ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-scientists-deep-brain-

BRAIN - Study reveals how people with a severe unexplained psychological illness have abnormal activity in the brain
Psychogenic diseases, formerly known as 'hysterical' illnesses, can have many severe symptoms such as painful cramps or paralysis but without any physical explanation. However, new research from the University of Cambridge and UCL (University College London) suggests that individuals with psychogenic disease, that is to say physical illness that stems from emotional or mental stresses, do have brains that function differently. The research was pu ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-reveals-people-severe-

BRAIN - Ultrasound reveals autism risk at birth
Low-birth-weight babies with a particular brain abnormality are at greater risk for autism, according to a new study that could provide doctors a signpost for early detection of the still poorly understood disorder ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-ultrasound-reveals-aut

DIABETES - Reprogramming cells to fight diabetes
For years researchers have been searching for a way to treat diabetics by reactivating their insulin-producing beta cells, with limited success. The "reprogramming" of related alpha cells into beta cells may one day offer a novel and complementary approach for treating type 2 diabetes. Treating human and mouse cells with compounds that modify cell nuclear material called chromatin induced the expression of beta cell genes in alpha cells, accordin ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130223111356.ht

DIGESTION - Study shows effectiveness of magnetic device for treatment of reflux disease
A study published February 21st in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) provides clinical evidence of the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic medical device to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Santiago Horgan, MD, professor of surgery at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and study co-author, was the first surgeon in the United States to implant the FDA-approved device ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-effectiveness-magnetic

FOODS - 10 great recipes for eating local and vegetarian in February
It's hard when there aren't a lot of fresh local vegetables around, but we round up a few of Kelly Rossiter's February recipes that do the jo ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/eat-local-

FOODS - Americans frequent victims of 'seafood fraud', report says
Fish sold in the United States is often deliberately mislabeled, making American consumers the unwitting victims of "widespread seafood fraud," according to a report out Thursday ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-americans-frequent-vic

FOODS - Hands-on cooking education aids docs' nutrition knowledge
(HealthDay)-Continuing education that includes didactic and hands-on cooking sessions improves physicians' self-reported nutrition-related behaviors, according to a research letter published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-hands-on-cooking-aids-

FOODS - Ikea pulls meatballs from Europe stores as horsemeat found
Swedish furniture giant Ikea has withdrawn its own-label meatballs from sale in at least 16 European countries after Czech authorities found horsemeat in the product, the company said Monday ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-ikea-meatballs-europea

FOODS - Scientists bake a better loaf of bread
Researchers have found a way to replace artificial preservatives in bread, making it tastier ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225112506.ht

FOODS - When the cost of healthy eating gets too high
Preaching the benefits of healthy eating has little point when the cost of purchasing healthy foods in South Australia can cost as much as a third of a low-earner's income, according to Flinders University researchers ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-healthy-high.htm

HEART - Mediterranean-style diets found to cut heart risks
Pour on the olive oil, preferably over fish and vegetables: One of the longest and most scientific tests of a Mediterranean diet suggests this style of eating can cut the chance of suffering heart-related problems, especially strokes, in older people at high risk of them ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-mediterranean-style-di

HEART - Resilient personality linked to cardiorespiratory fitness
(HealthDay)-While personality has no effect on energy expenditure at rest or during normal walking, people with a more resilient personality expend more energy when walking quickly, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in PLOS ONE ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-resilient-personality-

LONGEVITY - Patients with lower incomes less likely to die at home
(HealthDay)-Patients with limited financial resources are less likely to die at home, according to research published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-patients-incomes-die-h

NEWS - Analytical trick accelerates protein studies
Researchers have found a new way to accelerate a workhorse instrument that identifies proteins. The high-speed technique could help diagnose cancer sooner and point to new drugs for treating a wide range of conditions ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130224142658.ht

NEWS - Asthma drug found highly effective in treating chronic, severe hives and itch
An international team of researchers has found that a once-a-month, high-dose injection of a commonly used asthma drug is highly effective in treating teens and adults chronically afflicted with hives and severe, itchy rash. The drug, omalizumab, was tested on 323 people at 55 medical centers for whom standard antihistamine therapy failed to quell their underlying, allergy-like reaction, known as chronic idiopathic urticaria or chronic spontaneou ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130224142654.ht

NEWS - CDC: 2012-2013 flu vaccine not as effective in elderly
(HealthDay)-Vaccination against influenza for the 2012/2013 flu season appears to be moderately effective in reducing the need for outpatient medical attention, but the effect is lower in the elderly, according to research published in the Feb. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cdc-flu-vaccine-effect

NEWS - Childhood blood lead levels rise and fall with exposure to airborne dust in urban areas
(Medical Xpress)-A new nine-year study of more than 367,000 children in Detroit supports the idea that a mysterious seasonal fluctuation in blood lead levels-observed in urban areas throughout the United States and elsewhere in the northern hemisphere-results from resuspended dust contaminated with lead ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-childhood-blood-fall-e

NEWS - Higher income earners more likely to get doctors' appointments than lower income people
People of high socioeconomic status are more likely to be able to access primary care than those of low socioeconomic status, even within a universal health care system in which physicians are reimbursed equally for each patient, found an article published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-higher-income-earners-

NEWS - Liver stem cells grown in culture: Therapeutic benefit demonstrated
For decades scientists around the world have attempted to regenerate primary liver cells known as hepatocytes because of their numerous biomedical applications, including hepatitis research, drug metabolism and toxicity studies, as well as transplantation for cirrhosis and other chronic liver conditions. But no lab in the world has been successful in identifying and growing liver stem cells in culture -- using any available technique -- until now ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225153130.ht

NEWS - New device better traps viruses, airborne pathogens
Engineering researchers have created a new type of air-cleaning technology that could better protect human lungs from allergens, airborne viruses and ultrafine particles in the air ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130223111354.ht

NEWS - Wombs for rent: Indian surrogate mothers tell their tales
As baby Lili celebrates her first birthday in Australia, far away in India her surrogate mother recalls the day the child was born-and on whom she never laid eyes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-wombs-rent-indian-surr

NEWS-CANCER - CDC: 1.5 million new cancers diagnosed annually
(HealthDay)-In 2009, approximately 1.5 million new cases of cancer were diagnosed in the United States, with an annual incidence rate of 459 cases per 100,000 population, according to research published in the Feb. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cdc-million-cancers-an

NEWS-CANCER - Researchers find cancer aggression differences in different types of prostate cells
(Medical Xpress)-A research team made up of representatives from several cancer research centers in the United States has found that cancers that develop in the prostate of mice may be either aggressive or sluggish depending on the origin of their stem cell type. In their paper describing their findings, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, the team describes how they found that tumors that develop in parts of the prostate that have lumi ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cancer-aggression-diff

NEWS-CANCER - Virus shows promise as prostate cancer treatment
A recombinant Newcastle disease virus kills all kinds of prostate cancer cells, including hormone resistant cells, but leaves normal cells unscathed, according to a new article. A treatment for prostate cancer based on this virus would avoid the adverse side effects typically associated with hormonal treatment for prostate cancer, as well as those associated with cancer chemotherapies generally ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225153141.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - Children learn better when they figure things out for themselves, research finds
(Medical Xpress)-Research conducted by Penn State Brandywine Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies Jennifer Zosh has discovered that toddlers learn new words more effectively by using their knowledge about the world to infer the label of an object, rather than by simply being instructed and told which word goes with which object ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-children-figure.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Memory strategy may help depressed people remember the good times
New research highlights a memory strategy that may help people who suffer from depression in recalling positive day-to-day experiences. The study is published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-memory-strategy-depres

SKIN - Taking omega-3 supplements may help prevent skin cancer, new study finds
(Medical Xpress)-Taking omega-3 fish oils could help to protect against skin cancer, according to researchers at The University of Manchester. The team has just carried out the first clinical trial to examine the impact of the fish oils on the skin immunity of volunteers. Led by Professor Lesley Rhodes, Professor of Experimental Dermatology from the Photobiology Unit Dermatology Centre at the University, the study analysed the effect of taking om ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-omega-supplements-skin

SLEEP - Study finds children better at converting implicit into explicit knowledge after sleep
(Medical Xpress)-Researchers from Germany and Switzerland have found that children are able to do a better job of converting implicit knowledge into explicit knowledge after getting a night's sleep, than are adults. The team describes their study and results in their paper they've had published in the journal Nature Neuroscience ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-children-implicit-expl

WATERS - Fish gill-inspired water management system wins student design contest
The biomimetic design could increase water delivery efficiency, decrease water-borne illness, and lower wastewater operating costs ...
http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/fish-gill-inspire

WEIGHT - Weight and mortality: Researchers challenge results of obesity analysis
(Medical Xpress)-In January, when the Journal of the American Medical Association published a meta-analysis of 100 studies that probed the relationship between body mass index and mortality-studies that found slightly overweight people have lower all-cause mortality than normal weight and underweight people-media around the globe trumpeted the news ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-weight-mortality-resul

BRAIN - Ability of brain to protect itself from damage revealed

The origin of an innate ability the brain has to protect itself from damage that occurs in stroke has been explained for the first time. Researchers hope that harnessing this inbuilt biological mechanism, identified in rats, could help in treating stroke and preventing other neurodegenerative diseases in the future.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130224142823.ht

BRAIN - Ability of brain to protect itself from damage revealed

The origin of an innate ability the brain has to protect itself from damage that occurs in stroke has been explained for the first time.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-ability-brain-revealed.htm

BRAIN - FDA panel backs brain stimulator for epilepsy

(HealthDay News) - A U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel has unanimously backed a device that lowers the rate of seizures among people with epilepsy.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-fda-panel-brain-epilepsy_1.htm

BRAIN - Pain from the brain: Diseases formerly known as 'hysterical' illnesses

Psychogenic diseases, formerly known as "hysterical" illnesses, can have many severe symptoms such as painful cramps or paralysis, but without any physical explanation. However, new research suggests that individuals with psychogenic disease, that is to say physical illness that stems from emotional or mental stresses, do have brains that function differently.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225092250.ht

BRAIN - Researchers outline non-invasive method for detecting brain tumours by utilizing spectral texture features of MRI

Recent statistics showed that five percent of Malaysians have been diagnosed with brain tumours with glioma being the most common type. Radiologists commonly use MRI image sequences to detect glioma clinically by examining the abnormalities on T1-Weighted, T2-Weighted and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images. However, when the tumour cannot be detected visually, they will inject a contrast agent of gadolinium to enhance the image modality. This process delays acquisition of results is at a higher cost and imposes side effects to the patients. Therefore, this study proposes a non-invasive solution by utilizing spectral texture features of the MRI images in detecting the tumour in all three sequences of T1, T2-Weighted and FLAIR images.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-outline-non-invasive-method-brai

BRAIN - Scientists find way to image brain waste removal process, may lead to Alzheimer's diagnostic

(Medical Xpress)-A novel way to image the entire brain's glymphatic pathway, a dynamic process that clears waste and solutes from the brain that otherwise might build-up and contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease, may provide the basis for a new strategy to evaluate disease susceptibility, according to a research paper published online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Through contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other tools, a Stony Brook University-led research team successfully mapped this brain-wide pathway and identified key anatomical clearance routes of brain waste.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-scientists-image-brain-alzheimer

BRAIN - Scientists pinpoint how deep brain stimulation eases OCD

(HealthDay)-Deep brain stimulation has helped people with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder, and new research begins to explain why.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-scientists-deep-brain-eases-ocd.

BRAIN - Study reveals how people with a severe unexplained psychological illness have abnormal activity in the brain

Psychogenic diseases, formerly known as 'hysterical' illnesses, can have many severe symptoms such as painful cramps or paralysis but without any physical explanation. However, new research from the University of Cambridge and UCL (University College London) suggests that individuals with psychogenic disease, that is to say physical illness that stems from emotional or mental stresses, do have brains that function differently. The research was published today, 25 February, in the journal Brain.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-reveals-people-severe-unexplaine

BRAIN - Ultrasound reveals autism risk at birth

Low-birth-weight babies with a particular brain abnormality are at greater risk for autism, according to a new study that could provide doctors a signpost for early detection of the still poorly understood disorder.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-ultrasound-reveals-autism-birth.

DIABETES - Reprogramming cells to fight diabetes

For years researchers have been searching for a way to treat diabetics by reactivating their insulin-producing beta cells, with limited success. The "reprogramming" of related alpha cells into beta cells may one day offer a novel and complementary approach for treating type 2 diabetes. Treating human and mouse cells with compounds that modify cell nuclear material called chromatin induced the expression of beta cell genes in alpha cells, according to a new study.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130223111356.ht

DIGESTION - Study shows effectiveness of magnetic device for treatment of reflux disease

A study published February 21st in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) provides clinical evidence of the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic medical device to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Santiago Horgan, MD, professor of surgery at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and study co-author, was the first surgeon in the United States to implant the FDA-approved device.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-effectiveness-magnetic-device-tr

FOODS - 10 great recipes for eating local and vegetarian in February

It's hard when there aren't a lot of fresh local vegetables around, but we round up a few of Kelly Rossiter's February recipes that do the job

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/eat-local-and-vegeta

FOODS - Americans frequent victims of 'seafood fraud', report says

Fish sold in the United States is often deliberately mislabeled, making American consumers the unwitting victims of "widespread seafood fraud," according to a report out Thursday.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-americans-frequent-victims-seafo

FOODS - Hands-on cooking education aids docs' nutrition knowledge

(HealthDay)-Continuing education that includes didactic and hands-on cooking sessions improves physicians' self-reported nutrition-related behaviors, according to a research letter published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-hands-on-cooking-aids-docs-nutri

FOODS - Ikea pulls meatballs from Europe stores as horsemeat found

Swedish furniture giant Ikea has withdrawn its own-label meatballs from sale in at least 16 European countries after Czech authorities found horsemeat in the product, the company said Monday.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-ikea-meatballs-european-countrie

FOODS - Scientists bake a better loaf of bread

Researchers have found a way to replace artificial preservatives in bread, making it tastier.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225112506.ht

FOODS - When the cost of healthy eating gets too high

Preaching the benefits of healthy eating has little point when the cost of purchasing healthy foods in South Australia can cost as much as a third of a low-earner's income, according to Flinders University researchers.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-healthy-high.htm

HEART - Mediterranean-style diets found to cut heart risks

Pour on the olive oil, preferably over fish and vegetables: One of the longest and most scientific tests of a Mediterranean diet suggests this style of eating can cut the chance of suffering heart-related problems, especially strokes, in older people at high risk of them.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-mediterranean-style-diets-heart.

HEART - Resilient personality linked to cardiorespiratory fitness

(HealthDay)-While personality has no effect on energy expenditure at rest or during normal walking, people with a more resilient personality expend more energy when walking quickly, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in PLOS ONE.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-resilient-personality-linked-car

LONGEVITY - Patients with lower incomes less likely to die at home

(HealthDay)-Patients with limited financial resources are less likely to die at home, according to research published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-patients-incomes-die-home.htm

NEWS - Analytical trick accelerates protein studies

Researchers have found a new way to accelerate a workhorse instrument that identifies proteins. The high-speed technique could help diagnose cancer sooner and point to new drugs for treating a wide range of conditions.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130224142658.ht

NEWS - Asthma drug found highly effective in treating chronic, severe hives and itch

An international team of researchers has found that a once-a-month, high-dose injection of a commonly used asthma drug is highly effective in treating teens and adults chronically afflicted with hives and severe, itchy rash. The drug, omalizumab, was tested on 323 people at 55 medical centers for whom standard antihistamine therapy failed to quell their underlying, allergy-like reaction, known as chronic idiopathic urticaria or chronic spontaneous urticaria.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130224142654.ht

NEWS - CDC: 2012-2013 flu vaccine not as effective in elderly

(HealthDay)-Vaccination against influenza for the 2012/2013 flu season appears to be moderately effective in reducing the need for outpatient medical attention, but the effect is lower in the elderly, according to research published in the Feb. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cdc-flu-vaccine-effective.htm

NEWS - Childhood blood lead levels rise and fall with exposure to airborne dust in urban areas

(Medical Xpress)-A new nine-year study of more than 367,000 children in Detroit supports the idea that a mysterious seasonal fluctuation in blood lead levels-observed in urban areas throughout the United States and elsewhere in the northern hemisphere-results from resuspended dust contaminated with lead.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-childhood-blood-fall-exposure-ai

NEWS - Higher income earners more likely to get doctors' appointments than lower income people

People of high socioeconomic status are more likely to be able to access primary care than those of low socioeconomic status, even within a universal health care system in which physicians are reimbursed equally for each patient, found an article published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-higher-income-earners-doctors-pe

NEWS - Liver stem cells grown in culture: Therapeutic benefit demonstrated

For decades scientists around the world have attempted to regenerate primary liver cells known as hepatocytes because of their numerous biomedical applications, including hepatitis research, drug metabolism and toxicity studies, as well as transplantation for cirrhosis and other chronic liver conditions. But no lab in the world has been successful in identifying and growing liver stem cells in culture -- using any available technique -- until now.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225153130.ht

NEWS - New device better traps viruses, airborne pathogens

Engineering researchers have created a new type of air-cleaning technology that could better protect human lungs from allergens, airborne viruses and ultrafine particles in the air.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130223111354.ht

NEWS - Wombs for rent: Indian surrogate mothers tell their tales

As baby Lili celebrates her first birthday in Australia, far away in India her surrogate mother recalls the day the child was born-and on whom she never laid eyes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-wombs-rent-indian-surrogate-moth

NEWS-CANCER - CDC: 1.5 million new cancers diagnosed annually

(HealthDay)-In 2009, approximately 1.5 million new cases of cancer were diagnosed in the United States, with an annual incidence rate of 459 cases per 100,000 population, according to research published in the Feb. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cdc-million-cancers-annually.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Researchers find cancer aggression differences in different types of prostate cells

(Medical Xpress)-A research team made up of representatives from several cancer research centers in the United States has found that cancers that develop in the prostate of mice may be either aggressive or sluggish depending on the origin of their stem cell type. In their paper describing their findings, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, the team describes how they found that tumors that develop in parts of the prostate that have luminal stem cells showed more aggressive tendencies than did those that developed in areas with basal type stem cells.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-cancer-aggression-differences-pr

NEWS-CANCER - Virus shows promise as prostate cancer treatment

A recombinant Newcastle disease virus kills all kinds of prostate cancer cells, including hormone resistant cells, but leaves normal cells unscathed, according to a new article. A treatment for prostate cancer based on this virus would avoid the adverse side effects typically associated with hormonal treatment for prostate cancer, as well as those associated with cancer chemotherapies generally.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130225153141.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - Children learn better when they figure things out for themselves, research finds

(Medical Xpress)-Research conducted by Penn State Brandywine Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies Jennifer Zosh has discovered that toddlers learn new words more effectively by using their knowledge about the world to infer the label of an object, rather than by simply being instructed and told which word goes with which object.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-children-figure.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Memory strategy may help depressed people remember the good times

New research highlights a memory strategy that may help people who suffer from depression in recalling positive day-to-day experiences. The study is published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-memory-strategy-depressed-people