BRAIN - Parkinson's disease protein gums up garbage disposal system in cells

(Medical Xpress)-Clumps of α-synuclein protein in nerve cells are hallmarks of many degenerative brain diseases, most notably Parkinson's disease.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-parkinson-disease-protein-gums-g

BRAIN - Researchers discover that errors in RNA splicing lead to a class of neurological disorders

(Medical Xpress)-Researchers have found that missteps in a basic cellular process, RNA splicing, is the culprit behind a class of rare neurological disorders manifested by intellectual disability and stunted development.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-errors-rna-splicing-class-neurol

BRAIN - Researchers test implanted brain stimulator for Alzheimer's

(HealthDay)-Researchers are testing whether applying electrical stimulation directly to the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease might improve thinking, focus and alertness.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-implanted-brain-alzheimer.htm

BRAIN - Scientists identify brain's 'molecular memory switch'

Scientists have identified a key molecule responsible for triggering the chemical processes in our brain linked to our formation of memories. The findings, published in the journal Frontiers in Neural Circuits, reveal a new target for therapeutic interventions to reverse the devastating effects of memory loss.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-scientists-brain-molecular-memor

COOK - Dash Makes Delicious Additive-Free Greek Yogurt from Any Kind of Milk

NYC-based Dash company recently debuted a prototype of a Greek Yogurt Maker that makes delicious, creamy yogurt free from fake sugars and preservatives. Not only does this product have style, but it saves on packaging from purchasing yogurt in plastic containers. Best of all, it can even whip up vegan yogurt goodness from non-dairy milks like coconut, soy, or almond!Read the rest of Dash Makes Delicious Additive-Free Greek Yogurt from Any Kind of ...

dash, storebound, greek yogurt maker, vegan, homemade, DIY

http://inhabitat.com/dash-makes-delicious-additive-free-greek-yogurt-f

COOK - Polenta with savory tomato chickpea sauce

Delicious, filling, and incredibly healthy. Who could ask for more from this easy vegetarian recipe?

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/polenta-savory-tomat

DIABETES - Chinese medicine may hold the key to treating diabetes

(Medical Xpress)-Traditional Chinese medicine could be a key weapon in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, a joint international study has found.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-chinese-medicine-key-diabetes.ht

DIABETES - Study reveals how diabetes drug delays ageing in worms

A widely prescribed type 2 diabetes drug slows down the ageing process by mimicking the effects of dieting, according to a study published today using worms to investigate how the drug works.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-reveals-diabetes-drug-ageing-wor

DIABETES - Study shows dietary fat can affect glucose levels and insulin requirements in type 1 diabetes

In a study of patients with type 1 diabetes, Joslin researchers found that dietary fat can affect glucose levels and insulin requirements. These findings, which appeared in the April edition of Diabetes Care, have major implications for the management of type 1 diabetes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-dietary-fat-affect-glucose-insul

DIABETES - Tiny implant tests blood without the needle prick

Researchers say that this technology could make it cheaper and easier to deliver personalized care to the chronically ill.

http://www.treehugger.com/gadgets/tiny-implant-tests-blood-without-nee

EXERCISE - Cody app makes a play as virtual coach for casual fitness fans

Considering all the fitness apps already available - from Runkeeper and Nike+ to Fitocracy and MyFitnessPal, to name just a few - it's hard to imagine that there's still room for more. But two former Microsoft product managers believe those apps cater to the more motivated fitness fiends among us. On Thursday, they rolled out Cody, a fitness app intended for everyone else. "The way I observe the people who use existing apps today, I'd characteriz ...

Cody

http://gigaom.com/2013/03/28/cody-app-makes-a-play-as-virtual-coach-fo

EXERCISE - Park perks: Teenagers who live close to a park are more physically active

(Medical Xpress)-California teenagers who live close to a park or open space are more likely to get exercise than those who live in areas without parks nearby, a new policy brief from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research shows.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-perks-teenagers-physically.htm

EXERCISE - Smart app gives tips for an active lifestyle

Getting enough exercise is a big challenge for a lot of people. The solution: an app that provides personal activity tips at the right times. That concludes Yuzhong Lin in her doctoral research at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e). She has developed a mobile phone app that gives users tips on ways they can get more exercise, based on their location and lifestyle. Test subjects said they felt much more active after using the app. Lin defends her thesis at TU/e on Tuesday 2 April.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-smart-app-lifestyle.htm

FOODS - Better-educated parents feed children fewer fats and less sugar

The level of education of parents has an influence on the frequency with which their children eat foods linked to obesity. The children of parents with low and medium levels of education eat fewer vegetables and fruit and more processed products and sweet drinks.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-better-educated-parents-children

FOODS - Cooking site Food52 raises $2M to expand publishing, mobile and shopping initiatives

Food52, the crowdsourced cooking website cofounded by former New York Times food writer Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, has raised $2 million in Series A funding, the company announced on its blog Wednesday. The round was led by Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments and included participation from Vocap Ventures, Zelkova Ventures and Gary Vaynerchuk. Lerer Ventures, 15 Angels and investor Joanne Wilson, who had also participated in the company' ...

Food52 Ipad App

http://paidcontent.org/2013/03/28/cooking-site-food52-raises-2m-to-exp

FOODS - Eating more fiber may lower risk of first-time stroke

Eating more fiber may decrease your risk of first-time stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-fiber-first-time.htm

FOODS - Over-egging the chocolate this Easter: Why you should always keep an eye on what you are eating

(Medical Xpress)-Psychologists at the University of Birmingham suggest that 'attentive eating' affects how much people choose to eat.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-over-egging-chocolate-easter-eye

FOODS - Shopster grocery list app learns what you like and where you shop

Add to the list another thing your iOS can do for you: remind you to run your errands. A new app just hit the iOS App Store called Shopster that uses the geo-location services in the iPhone (or iPad or iPod touch) to not only keep track of where you frequently buy your groceries, but what you buy at which store. Then it can notify you when you're near those locations and what you might possibly need to run in and grab. Shopster costs 99 cents and ...

Shopster

http://gigaom.com/2013/03/28/shopster-grocery-list-app-learns-what-you

FOODS - This is what 2,000 calories of food looks like

We're supposed to eat about 2,000 calories a day. But what does that look like? This video shows us using different common foods.

http://www.treehugger.com/health/this-what-2000-calories-food-looks-li

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Innate immune system can kill HIV when a viral gene is deactivated

Human cells have an intrinsic capacity to destroy HIV. However, the virus has evolved to contain a gene that blocks this ability. When this gene is removed from the virus, the innate human immune system destroys HIV by mutating it to the point where it can no longer survive.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-innate-immune-hiv-viral-gene.htm

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - You have 100 trillion microbes on your body right now.

A lot of readers were worried to learn that resistance to antibiotics now kills more people than AIDS , but while the evolution of superbugs is certainly a problem, it's good to remember that not all bacteria are bad.

http://www.treehugger.com/health/you-have-100-trillion-microbes-your-b

LONGEVITY - 7 Ways to Live a Longer Life

Want to live a long life? Forget taking supplements and searching for a fountain of youth. The keys to longevity are probably much closer to home.

http://news.discovery.com/human/health/life-tips-study-longevity-healt

LONGEVITY - Hispanics live longest, whites shortest among dialysis patients

Among kidney failure patients on dialysis, Hispanics tend to live the longest and Whites the shortest, with Blacks' survival time in between these two, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). Examining the reasons for these survival differences could help improve care for all patients with kidney disease.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-hispanics-longest-whites-shortes

METABOLISM - Monosaturated fats reduce metabolic syndrome risk

Canola oil and high-oleic canola oils can lower abdominal fat when used in place of other selected oil blends, according to a team of American and Canadian researchers. The researchers also found that consuming certain vegetable oils may be a simple way of reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome, which affects about one in three U.S. adults and one in five Canadian adults.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-monosaturated-fats-metabolic-syn

NEWS - Academic urology training program in crisis

(HealthDay)-The current system of Graduate Medical Education (GME) funding is not adequate in funding urology residency programs and may lead to a significant shortage of urologists in the United States, according to research published in the March issue of Urology.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-academic-urology-crisis.htm

NEWS - America: Time to shake the salt habit?

The love affair between U.S. residents and salt is making us sick: high sodium intake increases blood pressure, and leads to higher rates of heart attack and strokes. Nonetheless, Americans continue to ingest far higher amounts of sodium than those recommended by physicians and national guidelines.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-america-salt-habit.htm

NEWS - Balding? Check for Prostate Cancer

A new study of African-American men strengthens the connection between early-onset balding and prostate cancer. ->

http://news.discovery.com/human/health/balding-check-for-prostate-canc

NEWS - Breakthrough in deafness and ovarian failure syndrome

(Medical Xpress)-Researchers from Manchester Biomedical Research Centre at Saint Mary's Hospital and the University of Manchester have identified a new gene, which increases our understanding of the rare inherited disorder Perrault syndrome.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-breakthrough-deafness-ovarian-fa

NEWS - Experimental drug may work against hepatitis C

(HealthDay)-An experimental therapy for hepatitis C-a "silent killer" linked to liver cancer and cirrhosis-has shown promise in tamping down virus levels in early trials.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-experimental-drug-hepatitis.htm

NEWS - Hot flashes? Active days bring better nights

Getting a good night's sleep isn't always easy for women at menopause. Exercise may help, but women can have a tough time carving out leisure time for it. The good news from a study published online today in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society, is that higher levels of routine daily physical activity may be the more important key to a better night's sleep for many women who have hot flashes or night sweats.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-hot-days-nights.htm

NEWS - In managing inflammation, controlling white blood cell flow may be key

(Medical Xpress)-New research by Yale University scientists sets the stage for improved management of acute tissue inflammation related to wounds and chronic inflammatory diseases by advancing current understanding of inflammatory processes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-inflammation-white-blood-cell-ke

NEWS - Just 'weight' until menopause: How estrogen deficiency affects women's fat absorption

Women tend to carry excess fat in their hips and thighs, while men tend to carry it on their stomachs. But after menopause, things start to change: many women's fat storage patterns start to resemble those of men. This indicates that there's a link between estrogen and body fat storage. This connection is well documented, but the underlying mechanisms remained poorly understood until now.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-weight-menopause-estrogen-defici

NEWS - Microscale medical sensors inserted under skin powered wirelessly by external handheld receiver

Implantable electronic devices potentially offer a rapid and accurate way for doctors to monitor patients with particular medical conditions. Yet powering such devices remains a fundamental challenge: batteries are bulky and eventually need recharging or replacing. Scientists are now developing an alternative approach that eliminates the need for a battery. Their miniature devices are based on wireless power-transfer technology.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130327162425.ht

NEWS - New insights into how genes turn on and off

Researchers at UC Davis and the University of British Columbia have shed new light on methylation, a critical process that helps control how genes are expressed. Working with placentas, the team discovered that 37 percent of the placental genome has regions of lower methylation, called partially methylated domains (PMDs), in which gene expression is turned off. This differs from most human tissues, in which 70 percent of the genome is highly methylated.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-insights-genes.htm

NEWS - Technology could provide a solution to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, save lives

(Medical Xpress)-Through the misuse and overuse of antibiotics, several types of bacteria have become resistant to drugs that were designed to kill them. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that some of these "superbugs" are linked to tens of thousands of deaths in the United States annually, including 14,000 for C. difficile and 19,000 for MRSA.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-technology-solution-antibiotic-r

NEWS-CANCER - New metabolite-based diagnostic test could help detect pancreatic cancer early

A new diagnostic test that uses a scientific technique known as metabolomic analysis may be a safe and easy screening method that could improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer through earlier detection.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-metabolite-based-diagnostic-panc

NEWS-CANCER - Number of cancer survivors expected to increase to 18 million by 2022

The American Association for Cancer Research released its second Annual Report on Cancer Survivorship in the United States in advance of the AACR Annual Meeting 2013, which will be held in Washington, D.C., April 6-10.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-cancer-survivors-million.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Scientists find potential loophole in pancreatic cancer defenses

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists and colleagues have discovered that pancreatic cancer cells' growth and spread are fueled by an unusual metabolic pathway that someday might be blocked with targeted drugs to control the deadly cancer.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-scientists-potential-loophole-pa

NEWS-CANCER - York scientists discover driving force behind prostate cancer

Scientists at the University of York have discovered the driving force behind the development of prostate cancer.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-york-scientists-prostate-cancer.

PSYCHOLOGY - Marital conflict causes stress in children, may affect cognitive development

Marital conflict is a significant source of environmental stress for children, and witnessing such conflict may harm children's stress response systems which, in turn, may affect their mental and intellectual development.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-marital-conflict-stress-children

PSYCHOLOGY - Report calls for strengthening of academic psychiatry

(Medical Xpress)-Professors Shitij Kapur and Sir Simon Wessely, King's College London Institute of Psychiatry, are contributors to a major new report by the Academy of Medical Sciences - Strengthening academic psychiatry in the UK. The report calls for a breakdown of unhelpful boundaries between psychiatry and neuroscience and makes recommendations for strengthening academic psychiatry to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of mental ill health.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-academic-psychiatry.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Surfer Shows Freaky Lack of Fear

In the world of professional surfing, Garrett McNamara's calm ride stands out. ->

http://news.discovery.com/adventure/extreme-sports/surfer-shows-freaky

PSYCHOLOGY - Telling tales can be a good thing

The act of talking is not an area where ability is usually considered along gender lines. However, a new study published in Springer's journal Sex Roles has found subtle differences between the sexes in their story-relating ability and specifically the act of reminiscing. The research by Widaad Zaman from the University of Central Florida and her colleague Robyn Fivush from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, discusses how these gender differences in parents can affect children's emotional development.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-tales-good.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - The hunt for a successor to lithium for bipolar disorder

Toxicity problems and adverse side effects when taking lithium, the mainstay medication for treating bipolar disorder, are fostering a scientific hunt for insights into exactly how lithium works in the body-with an eye to developing a safer alternative. That's the topic of the cover story in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News. C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-successor-lithium-bipolar-disord

PSYCHOLOGY - The memories of near death experiences: More real than reality?

University of Liege researchers have demonstrated that the physiological mechanisms triggered during NDE lead to a more vivid perception not only of imagined events in the history of an individual but also of real events which have taken place in their lives! These surprising results - obtained using an original method which now requires further investigation - are published in PLOS ONE.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-memories-death-real-reality.htm

SKIN - Psoriasis tied to increased risk of new-onset diabetes

(HealthDay)-Psoriasis is significantly tied to an increased risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a study published online March 14 in Diabetes Care.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-psoriasis-tied-new-onset-diabete

SPIRITUALITY - The memories of near death experiences: More real than reality?

University of Liege researchers have demonstrated that the physiological mechanisms triggered during NDE lead to a more vivid perception not only of imagined events in the history of an individual but also of real events which have taken place in their lives! These surprising results - obtained using an original method which now requires further investigation - are published in PLOS ONE.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-memories-death-real-reality.htm

WATER - 55 percent of U.S. rivers and streams are in poor condition, says EPA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sampled around 2,000 rivers and streams, and what they found is not good...

http://www.treehugger.com/clean-water/55-percent-us-rivers-and-streams

WATER - The Capital of Water

How to turn around a struggling industrial city

http://www.forbes.com/sites/joannmuller/2013/03/27/the-capital-of-wate

WEIGHT - A new way to lose weight? Study shows that changes to gut microbiota may play role in weight loss

Scientists at Harvard may have new hope for anyone who's tried to fight the battle of the bulge. New research, conducted in collaboration with researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, has found that the gut microbes of mice undergo drastic changes following gastric bypass surgery. Transfer of these microbes into sterile mice resulted in rapid weight loss. The study is described in a March 27 paper in Science Translational Medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-weight-gut-microbiota-role-loss.

WEIGHT - Completing a dangerous cycle: The downward spiral of obesity

(Medical Xpress)-Physical activity and its relation to obesity has been studied for decades by researchers; however, almost no one has studied the reverse - obesity's effect on physical activity.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-dangerous-downward-spiral-obesit

HEALTH PORTATION News March 27th

BRAIN - Battery-operated skin patch offers new option for migraine sufferers
(HealthDay)-The first skin patch approved to treat migraines offers patients an alternative to pills, nasal sprays and injections, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-battery-operated-skin-

BRAIN - Better treatment for stroke patients on horizon
Two molecules may provide, for the first time, an indication of which stroke patients will suffer a further, long-term neurological deficit, allowing doctors to tailor treatment more effectively ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-treatment-patients-hor

BRAIN - Chelation therapy may result in small reduction of risk of CV events
Although chelation therapy with the drug disodium EDTA has been used for many years with limited evidence of efficacy for the treatment of coronary disease, a randomized trial that included patients with a prior heart attack found that use of a chelation regimen modestly reduced the risk of a composite of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but the findings do not support the routine use of chelation therapy for treatment of patients who have had a ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-chelation-therapy-resu

BRAIN - EEG identifies seizures in hospital patients, study finds
Electroencephalogram (EEG), which measures and records electrical activity in the brain, is a quick and efficient way of determining whether seizures are the cause of altered mental status (AMS) and spells, according to a study by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-eeg-seizures-hospital-

BRAIN - Radiosurgery for treating unruptured intracranial arteriovenous malformations
Researchers at the University of Virginia (UVA) Health System recommend radiosurgery for treating unruptured arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), because the procedure has a reasonable benefit-to-risk profile. They base this recommendation on an evaluation of clinical and radiographic outcomes in 444 patients treated with radiosurgery for unruptured AVMs at their institution. Detailed findings in this single-institution patient cohort are reported ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-radiosurgery-unrupture

BRAIN - Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup
Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-scientists-proton-radi

CHOLESTEROL - Commonly used cholesterol calculation underestimates heart disease danger for many
In what promises to be an eye-opener for many doctors and patients who routinely depend on cholesterol testing, a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine found that the standard formula used for decades to calculate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels is often inaccurate. Of most concern, the researchers say, is their finding that the widely used formula underestimates LDL where accuracy matters mo ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-commonly-cholesterol-u

FOODS - Foods can help fight inflammation
Inflammation is the body's normal response to injury. While it may be a natural defense system, it can lead to disease development if it becomes chronic. A University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) expert says one way to fight inflammation is with food ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-foods-inflammation.htm

FOODS - Protein-rich breakfasts prevent unhealthy snacking in the evening
Breakfast might be the most important meal of the day, but up to 60 percent of American young people consistently skip it. Now, Heather Leidy, an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, says eating a breakfast rich in protein significantly improves appetite control and reduces unhealthy snacking on high-fat or high-sugar foods in the evening, which could help improve the diets of more than 25 million overweight ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-protein-rich-breakfast

HEART - New insights into the development of the heart
Viewed from the outside, our body looks completely symmetrical. However, most internal organs - including the heart - are formed asymmetrically. The right side of the heart is responsible for pulmonary circulation; the left side supplies the rest of the body. This asymmetry allows the heart to do its job effectively. In a study on zebrafish embryos, the researchers Dr. Justus Veerkamp and PD Dr. Salim Seyfried from the Max Delbrück Center for Mo ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-insights-heart.htm

HEART - World first online treatment helps depression and heart disease
(Medical Xpress)-University of Sydney researchers have found a 40 percent improvement in the mental health of people with both depression and cardiovascular disease after using e-couch - a free online program that helps depression or anxiety sufferers regain control of mood to improve their lives ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-world-online-treatment

LONGEVITY - Fewer children mean longer life?
New research into ageing processes, based on modern genetic techniques, confirms theoretical expectations about the correlation between reproduction and lifespan. Studies of birds reveal that those that have offspring later in life and have fewer broods live longer. And the decisive factor is telomeres, shows research from The University of Gothenburg, Sweden ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-children-longer-life.h

NEWS - A big gulp: Patients with swallowing difficulties could soon be more effectively tested
Those suffering from swallowing difficulties, especially stroke patients, could be evaluated more efficiently and noninvasively thanks to research under way at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Toronto ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-big-gulp-patients-swal

NEWS - Azithromycin may provide benefit for treatment of respiratory disorder
Among patients with the lung disorder non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, treatment with the antibiotic azithromycin resulted in improvement in symptoms but also increased the risk of antibiotic resistance, according to a study appearing in the March 27 issue of JAMA ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-azithromycin-benefit-t

NEWS - Counting white blood cells at home
Engineers have developed a portable device to count white blood cells that needs less than a pinprick's worth of blood and takes just minutes to run. The device can provide accurate differential counts of the major white blood cell subtypes ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130326101608.ht

NEWS - Even the poorest handheld umbrellas can block UV rays
(HealthDay)-Handheld umbrellas are effective at blocking ultraviolet radiation (UVR), according to a study published online March 20 in JAMA Dermatology ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-poorest-handheld-umbre

NEWS - How researchers are fighting lung cancer using PageRank
Google's PageRank algorithm has forever changed the way we access information by putting the best stuff first, and now researchers are using the same mathematical models that Google uses to fight the spread of lung cancer within the human body. While there's no "best" when it comes cancer cells, the aim is to identify tumors more likely to metastasize and then hit them with targeted treatment before the cells have a chance to spread. The research ...
How cancer cells spread. Source: PLOS One
http://gigaom.com/2013/03/26/how-researchers-are-fighting-lu

NEWS - New technology measures oxygen in individual red blood cells in real time
In an engineering breakthrough, a biomedical researcher has discovered a way to use light and color to measure oxygen in individual red blood cells in real time ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130325160512.ht

NEWS - Rats' brains are more like ours than scientists previously thought
(Medical Xpress)-Neuroscientists face a multitude of challenges in their efforts to better understand the human brain. If not for model organisms such as the rat, they might never know what really goes on inside our heads ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-rats-brains-scientists

NEWS - Research provides clues to alcohol addiction vulnerability
(Medical Xpress)-A Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center team studying alcohol addiction has new research that might shed light on why some drinkers are more susceptible to addiction than others ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-clues-alcohol-addictio

NEWS - Researchers attach Lyme disease antibodies to nanotubes, paving way for diagnostic device
Existing Lyme disease tests assess the presence of antibodies, which take weeks to form after the initial infection and persist after the infection is gone. Now, a nanotechnology-inspired technique may lead to diagnostics that can detect the organism itself ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130326194140.ht

NEWS - Researchers build functional ovarian tissue in lab
A proof-of-concept study suggests the possibility of engineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a more natural option for hormone replacement therapy for women. In Biomaterials, a team from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine report that in the laboratory setting, engineered ovaries showed sustained release of the sex hormones estrogen and progesterone ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-functional-ovarian-tis

NEWS - Switching night vision on or off
Neurobiologists at the Friedrich Miescher Institute have been able to dissect a mechanism in the retina that facilitates our ability to see both in the dark and in the light. They identified a cellular switch that activates distinct neuronal circuits at a defined light level. The switch cells of the retina act quickly and reliably to turn on and off computations suited specifically for vision in low and high light levels thus facilitating the tra ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-night-vision.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Cancer cells disguised as stem cells gain extra resistance
Why are certain cancer cells so resistant? The answer may be that they have either retained or acquired attributes normally found in stem cells ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-cancer-cells-disguised

NEWS-CANCER - Many cancer institution websites lack nutritional guidance, others give mixed messages
Radiation oncologists at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are stressing the need for evidence-based, standardized guidelines on dietary recommendations for cancer patients-and with good reason. A new analysis revealed that online dietary recommendations for cancer patients, if even present on an institution's website, appear to be consistently inconsistent ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-cancer-websites-lack-n

NEWS-CANCER - New cancer detection and brain imaging techniques presented
A non-invasive imaging technique which may help in the earlier detection of cancer is among the innovative research being presented at BioPIC 2013, a BioPhotonics and Imaging Conference, taking place in Castleknock Hotel and Country Club, Dublin from 25th - 27th March ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-cancer-brain-imaging-t

NEWS-CANCER - Researchers design small molecule to disrupt cancer-causing protein
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues at the University of South Florida have developed a small molecule that inhibits STAT3, a protein that causes cancer. This development could impact the treatment of several tumor types, including breast, lung, prostate and others that depend on STAT3 for survival ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-small-molecule-disrupt

NEWS-CANCER - Team discovers how drug prevents aging and cancer progression
University of Montreal researchers have discovered a novel molecular mechanism that can potentially slows the aging process and may prevent the progression of some cancers. In the March 23 online edition of the prestigious journal Aging Cell, scientists from the University of Montreal explain how they found that the antidiabetic drug metformin reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines that normally activate the immune system, but if overpr ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-team-drug-aging-cancer

PSYCHOLOGY - Few People Understand The Difference Between Risk And Genuine Uncertainty
What are the odds that your new idea will succeed? If it does, what will the return to you be? One of the problems that we have in business (and life!) is that we often can't know the answer to questions like this in advance. And this drives us nuts. Consequently, a lot of people invest a great deal of effort into reducing uncertainty. There are two problems with this approach. The first is that we often don't understand uncertainty very wel ...
http://www.businessinsider.com/difference-between-risk-and-u

PSYCHOLOGY - Link between emotions, physical health universal, researcher says
(Medical Xpress)-Much research has demonstrated a link between individuals' emotional and physical health. For example, depression and stress have been tied to self-reports of increased pain, fatigue and disease, whereas positive emotions have been tied to decreases in those ailments ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-link-emotions-physical

PSYCHOLOGY - Seeing happiness in ambiguous facial expressions reduces aggressive behaviour, study finds
(Medical Xpress)-Encouraging young people at high-risk of criminal offending and delinquency to see happiness rather than anger in facial expressions results in a decrease in their levels of anger and aggression, new research from the University of Bristol has found ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-happiness-ambiguous-fa

PSYCHOLOGY - Why happiness is a global issue
Nic Marks at The Guardian writes on the importance of seeing happiness as a business and political issue ...
http://www.treehugger.com/culture/why-happiness-global-issue

VITAMINS - Vitamin D may lower diabetes risk in obese children and adolescents, study finds
Childhood and adolescent obesity rates in the United States have increased dramatically in the past three decades. Being obese puts individuals at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease in which individuals have too much sugar in their blood. Now, University of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-vitamin-d-diabetes-obe

WATER - Ocean Array Could Clean Up Tons Of Plastic
A young entrepreneur has an innovative design for cleaning up the plastic waste that plagues the world's oceans. -&gt ...
http://news.discovery.com/tech/robotics/ocean-array-7-millio

WATER - Teen invents device to clean giant ocean garbage patches
At an age when most people are just thinking about what they want to do with their lives, one 19 year old is inventing a method of cleaning up the ocean's plastic garbage patches ...
http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/teen-invents-devi

BRAIN - Battery-operated skin patch offers new option for migraine sufferers

(HealthDay)-The first skin patch approved to treat migraines offers patients an alternative to pills, nasal sprays and injections, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-battery-operated-skin-patch-opti

BRAIN - Better treatment for stroke patients on horizon

Two molecules may provide, for the first time, an indication of which stroke patients will suffer a further, long-term neurological deficit, allowing doctors to tailor treatment more effectively.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-treatment-patients-horizon.htm

BRAIN - Chelation therapy may result in small reduction of risk of CV events

Although chelation therapy with the drug disodium EDTA has been used for many years with limited evidence of efficacy for the treatment of coronary disease, a randomized trial that included patients with a prior heart attack found that use of a chelation regimen modestly reduced the risk of a composite of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but the findings do not support the routine use of chelation therapy for treatment of patients who have had a heart attack, according to a study in the March 27 issue of JAMA.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-chelation-therapy-result-small-r

BRAIN - EEG identifies seizures in hospital patients, study finds

Electroencephalogram (EEG), which measures and records electrical activity in the brain, is a quick and efficient way of determining whether seizures are the cause of altered mental status (AMS) and spells, according to a study by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-eeg-seizures-hospital-patients.h

BRAIN - Radiosurgery for treating unruptured intracranial arteriovenous malformations

Researchers at the University of Virginia (UVA) Health System recommend radiosurgery for treating unruptured arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), because the procedure has a reasonable benefit-to-risk profile. They base this recommendation on an evaluation of clinical and radiographic outcomes in 444 patients treated with radiosurgery for unruptured AVMs at their institution. Detailed findings in this single-institution patient cohort are reported and discussed in "Radiosurgery for patients with unruptured intracranial arteriovenous malformations. Clinical article" by Dale Ding, M.D., Chun-Po Yen, M.D., Zhiyuan Xu, M.D., Robert M. Starke, M.D., M.Sc., and Jason P. Sheehan, M.D., Ph.D., published today online, ahead of print, in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-radiosurgery-unruptured-intracra

BRAIN - Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-scientists-proton-radiography-br

CHOLESTEROL - Commonly used cholesterol calculation underestimates heart disease danger for many

In what promises to be an eye-opener for many doctors and patients who routinely depend on cholesterol testing, a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine found that the standard formula used for decades to calculate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels is often inaccurate. Of most concern, the researchers say, is their finding that the widely used formula underestimates LDL where accuracy matters most-in the range considered desirable for high-risk patients. Results of the study are published in an online article, ahead of print, in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-commonly-cholesterol-underestima

FOODS - Foods can help fight inflammation

Inflammation is the body's normal response to injury. While it may be a natural defense system, it can lead to disease development if it becomes chronic. A University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) expert says one way to fight inflammation is with food.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-foods-inflammation.htm

FOODS - Protein-rich breakfasts prevent unhealthy snacking in the evening

Breakfast might be the most important meal of the day, but up to 60 percent of American young people consistently skip it. Now, Heather Leidy, an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, says eating a breakfast rich in protein significantly improves appetite control and reduces unhealthy snacking on high-fat or high-sugar foods in the evening, which could help improve the diets of more than 25 million overweight or obese young adults in the U.S.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-protein-rich-breakfasts-unhealth

HEART - New insights into the development of the heart

Viewed from the outside, our body looks completely symmetrical. However, most internal organs - including the heart - are formed asymmetrically. The right side of the heart is responsible for pulmonary circulation; the left side supplies the rest of the body. This asymmetry allows the heart to do its job effectively. In a study on zebrafish embryos, the researchers Dr. Justus Veerkamp and PD Dr. Salim Seyfried from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch have now shown how the left and right sides of the heart develop differently. Their findings were published in the journal Developmental Cell.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-insights-heart.htm

HEART - World first online treatment helps depression and heart disease

(Medical Xpress)-University of Sydney researchers have found a 40 percent improvement in the mental health of people with both depression and cardiovascular disease after using e-couch - a free online program that helps depression or anxiety sufferers regain control of mood to improve their lives.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-world-online-treatment-depressio

LONGEVITY - Fewer children mean longer life?

New research into ageing processes, based on modern genetic techniques, confirms theoretical expectations about the correlation between reproduction and lifespan. Studies of birds reveal that those that have offspring later in life and have fewer broods live longer. And the decisive factor is telomeres, shows research from The University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-children-longer-life.htm

NEWS - A big gulp: Patients with swallowing difficulties could soon be more effectively tested

Those suffering from swallowing difficulties, especially stroke patients, could be evaluated more efficiently and noninvasively thanks to research under way at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Toronto.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-big-gulp-patients-swallowing-dif

NEWS - Azithromycin may provide benefit for treatment of respiratory disorder

Among patients with the lung disorder non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, treatment with the antibiotic azithromycin resulted in improvement in symptoms but also increased the risk of antibiotic resistance, according to a study appearing in the March 27 issue of JAMA.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-azithromycin-benefit-treatment-r

NEWS - Counting white blood cells at home

Engineers have developed a portable device to count white blood cells that needs less than a pinprick's worth of blood and takes just minutes to run. The device can provide accurate differential counts of the major white blood cell subtypes.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130326101608.ht

NEWS - Even the poorest handheld umbrellas can block UV rays

(HealthDay)-Handheld umbrellas are effective at blocking ultraviolet radiation (UVR), according to a study published online March 20 in JAMA Dermatology.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-poorest-handheld-umbrellas-block

NEWS - How researchers are fighting lung cancer using PageRank

Google's PageRank algorithm has forever changed the way we access information by putting the best stuff first, and now researchers are using the same mathematical models that Google uses to fight the spread of lung cancer within the human body. While there's no "best" when it comes cancer cells, the aim is to identify tumors more likely to metastasize and then hit them with targeted treatment before the cells have a chance to spread. The research ...

How cancer cells spread. Source: PLOS One

http://gigaom.com/2013/03/26/how-researchers-are-fighting-lung-cancer-

NEWS - New technology measures oxygen in individual red blood cells in real time

In an engineering breakthrough, a biomedical researcher has discovered a way to use light and color to measure oxygen in individual red blood cells in real time.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130325160512.ht

NEWS - Rats' brains are more like ours than scientists previously thought

(Medical Xpress)-Neuroscientists face a multitude of challenges in their efforts to better understand the human brain. If not for model organisms such as the rat, they might never know what really goes on inside our heads.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-rats-brains-scientists-previousl

NEWS - Research provides clues to alcohol addiction vulnerability

(Medical Xpress)-A Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center team studying alcohol addiction has new research that might shed light on why some drinkers are more susceptible to addiction than others.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-clues-alcohol-addiction-vulnerab

NEWS - Researchers attach Lyme disease antibodies to nanotubes, paving way for diagnostic device

Existing Lyme disease tests assess the presence of antibodies, which take weeks to form after the initial infection and persist after the infection is gone. Now, a nanotechnology-inspired technique may lead to diagnostics that can detect the organism itself.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130326194140.ht

NEWS - Researchers build functional ovarian tissue in lab

A proof-of-concept study suggests the possibility of engineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a more natural option for hormone replacement therapy for women. In Biomaterials, a team from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine report that in the laboratory setting, engineered ovaries showed sustained release of the sex hormones estrogen and progesterone.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-functional-ovarian-tissue-lab.ht

NEWS - Switching night vision on or off

Neurobiologists at the Friedrich Miescher Institute have been able to dissect a mechanism in the retina that facilitates our ability to see both in the dark and in the light. They identified a cellular switch that activates distinct neuronal circuits at a defined light level. The switch cells of the retina act quickly and reliably to turn on and off computations suited specifically for vision in low and high light levels thus facilitating the transition from night to day vision. The scientists have published their results online in Neuron.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-night-vision.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Cancer cells disguised as stem cells gain extra resistance

Why are certain cancer cells so resistant? The answer may be that they have either retained or acquired attributes normally found in stem cells.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-cancer-cells-disguised-stem-gain

NEWS-CANCER - Many cancer institution websites lack nutritional guidance, others give mixed messages

Radiation oncologists at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are stressing the need for evidence-based, standardized guidelines on dietary recommendations for cancer patients-and with good reason. A new analysis revealed that online dietary recommendations for cancer patients, if even present on an institution's website, appear to be consistently inconsistent.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-cancer-websites-lack-nutritional

NEWS-CANCER - New cancer detection and brain imaging techniques presented

A non-invasive imaging technique which may help in the earlier detection of cancer is among the innovative research being presented at BioPIC 2013, a BioPhotonics and Imaging Conference, taking place in Castleknock Hotel and Country Club, Dublin from 25th - 27th March.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-cancer-brain-imaging-techniques.

NEWS-CANCER - Researchers design small molecule to disrupt cancer-causing protein

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues at the University of South Florida have developed a small molecule that inhibits STAT3, a protein that causes cancer. This development could impact the treatment of several tumor types, including breast, lung, prostate and others that depend on STAT3 for survival.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-small-molecule-disrupt-cancer-ca

NEWS-CANCER - Team discovers how drug prevents aging and cancer progression

University of Montreal researchers have discovered a novel molecular mechanism that can potentially slows the aging process and may prevent the progression of some cancers. In the March 23 online edition of the prestigious journal Aging Cell, scientists from the University of Montreal explain how they found that the antidiabetic drug metformin reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines that normally activate the immune system, but if overproduced can lead to pathological inflammation, a condition that both damages tissues in aging and favors tumor growth.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-team-drug-aging-cancer.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Few People Understand The Difference Between Risk And Genuine Uncertainty

What are the odds that your new idea will succeed? If it does, what will the return to you be? One of the problems that we have in business (and life!) is that we often can't know the answer to questions like this in advance. And this drives us nuts. Consequently, a lot of people invest a great deal of effort into reducing uncertainty. There are two problems with this approach. The first is that we often don't understand uncertainty very wel ...

http://www.businessinsider.com/difference-between-risk-and-uncertainty

PSYCHOLOGY - Link between emotions, physical health universal, researcher says

(Medical Xpress)-Much research has demonstrated a link between individuals' emotional and physical health. For example, depression and stress have been tied to self-reports of increased pain, fatigue and disease, whereas positive emotions have been tied to decreases in those ailments.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-link-emotions-physical-health-un

PSYCHOLOGY - Seeing happiness in ambiguous facial expressions reduces aggressive behaviour, study finds

(Medical Xpress)-Encouraging young people at high-risk of criminal offending and delinquency to see happiness rather than anger in facial expressions results in a decrease in their levels of anger and aggression, new research from the University of Bristol has found.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-happiness-ambiguous-facial-aggre

PSYCHOLOGY - Why happiness is a global issue

Nic Marks at The Guardian writes on the importance of seeing happiness as a business and political issue.

http://www.treehugger.com/culture/why-happiness-global-issue.htm

VITAMINS - Vitamin D may lower diabetes risk in obese children and adolescents, study finds

Childhood and adolescent obesity rates in the United States have increased dramatically in the past three decades. Being obese puts individuals at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease in which individuals have too much sugar in their blood. Now, University of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-vitamin-d-diabetes-obese-childre

WATER - Ocean Array Could Clean Up Tons Of Plastic

A young entrepreneur has an innovative design for cleaning up the plastic waste that plagues the world's oceans. ->
http://news.discovery.com/tech/robotics/ocean-array-7-million-tons-pla

WATER - Teen invents device to clean giant ocean garbage patches

At an age when most people are just thinking about what they want to do with their lives, one 19 year old is inventing a method of cleaning up the ocean's plastic garbage patches.

http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/teen-invents-device-clean-o

HEALTH PORTATION News March 25th

BRAIN - Is Obama's plan to map the human brain this generation's equivalent to landing a man on the moon?
President John F. Kennedy's mission in 1960 was to land a man on the moon. President Bill Clinton made cracking the human genome one of his top priorities. Now, President Barack Obama says a detailed map of the human brain is necessary to understand how it works and what needs to be done when it's not working properly. The president is expected to unveil his plans for an estimated $3 billion, decade-long commitment to the Brain Activity Map proj ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-obama-human-brain-equi

BRAIN - MRI shows brain abnormalities in migraine patients
A new study suggests that migraines are related to brain abnormalities present at birth and others that develop over time. The research is published online in the journal Radiology ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-mri-brain-abnormalitie

BRAIN - New mechanism for long-term memory formation discovered
UC Irvine neurobiologists have found a novel molecular mechanism that helps trigger the formation of long-term memory. The researchers believe the discovery of this mechanism adds another piece to the puzzle in the ongoing effort to uncover the mysteries of memory and, potentially, certain intellectual disabilities ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-mechanism-long-term-me

BRAIN - Parkinsons' drug helps older people to make decisions
A drug widely used to treat Parkinson's Disease can help to reverse age-related impairments in decision making in some older people, a study from researchers at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging has shown ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-parkinsons-drug-older-

BRAIN - Study finds brain origins of variation in pathological anxiety
New findings from nonhuman primates suggest that an overactive core circuit in the brain, and its interaction with other specialized circuits, accounts for the variability in symptoms shown by patients with severe anxiety. In a brain-imaging study to be published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health describe work that for the f ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-brain-variation-pathol

BRAIN - Top Tips To Improve Your Memory
http://www.forbes.com/pictures/ehjh45hkhm/convert-info-into-

CHOLESTEROL - Lymphatic vasculature: A cholesterol removal system
Reverse cholesterol transport is a process in which accumulated cholesterol is removed from tissues, including the artery wall, and transported back to the liver for excretion. Little is known about how cholesterol is removed from peripheral tissues, but a better understanding of these mechanisms could help in the development of therapies that treat atherosclerosis and other cholesterol-related disorders ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-lymphatic-vasculature-

DIABETES - Higher mortality rate seen in middle-aged diabetes patients
(HealthDay)-Middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes, particularly women and those under the age of 55, have a two to three times higher risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality than people without diabetes, according to research published online Feb. 22 in Diabetes Care ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-higher-mortality-middl

DIABETES - Prospective human data link mercury exposure to diabetes
(HealthDay)-Young adults exposed to mercury have a higher risk of developing diabetes later in life, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Diabetes Care ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-prospective-human-link

DIABETES - Researchers use goal-oriented therapy to treat diabetic neuropathies
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and VA Boston Healthcare System (VA BHS) have found that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help relieve pain for people with painful diabetic neuropathies. The study, which is the first of its kind to examine this treatment for people with type II diabetes mellitus, is published in the March issue of the Journal of Pain ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-goal-oriented-therapy-

BRAIN - When food is scarce, a smaller brain will do
A new study explains how young brains are protected when nutrition is poor. The findings, published on March 7th in Cell Reports, a Cell Press publication, reveal a coping strategy for producing a fully functional, if smaller, brain. The discovery, which was made in larval flies, shows the brain as an incredibly adaptable organ and may have implications for understanding the developing human brain as well, the researchers say ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-food-scarce-smaller-br

DIGESTION - Other stomach microbiota modulate resistance to H. pylori-driven ulcers
Mice with different naturally occurring stomach bacteria have distinct susceptibilities to disease caused by Helicobacter pylori, the well-known cause of ulcers in humans, according to a study published online ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity. This is the first study to document (in mice) that the presence of certain bacteria in the stomach microbiota can prevent pathology from H. pylori ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-stomach-microbiota-mod

EXERCISE - Exercise shields children from stress
Exercise may play a key role in helping children cope with stressful situations, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-shields-children-stres

FOODS - 15 Items Every Guy Should Have In His Kitchen
The kitchen is not always the priority for a guy outfitting his bachelor pad. So we came up 15 kitchen accessories on the market right now that every man should have in his home. Whether you're an amateur gourmet or use the sink strictly to mix drinks, these items will take any guy's kitchen to the next level.The HoverBar is great if you're following recipe apps and tutorials. The adjustable arm rotates the iPad into portrait or landscape positio ...
Modern Kitchen bachelor pad
http://www.businessinsider.com/15-things-every-man-needs-in-

FOODS - DIY Recipe: How to Make Raw Vegan Cashew Cheese
Cheese ranks near the top of the list of animal products that vegans have a hard time letting go of, but there are several yummy and nutritious vegan substitutes. One of our favorite types of non-dairy cheese is raw vegan cashew cheese, which is easy to make and healthy. The versatile cheese that is great on pasta, as the filling of ravioli, or even as a dip for crackers and veggie sticks. Head over to Inhabitots to learn how to make your own bat ...
cashew cheese, cashews, vegan cheese, dairy-free cheese, raw cashew cheese
http://inhabitat.com/diy-recipe-how-to-make-raw-vegan-cashew

FOODS - Spicy mushroom stir-fry
For an incredibly fast and filling meal, try this simple stir-fry recipe, which features mustard and fennel seeds and the zip of lime juice ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/spicy-mush

HEART - Heart repair breakthroughs replace surgeon's knife
(AP)-Have a heart problem? If it's fixable, there's a good chance it can be done without surgery, using tiny tools and devices that are pushed through tubes into blood vessels ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-heart-breakthroughs-su

HEART - Researchers getting closer to growing a human heart
(Medical Xpress)-Researchers in Spain, led by doctor Francisco Fernandez-Aviles, are blazing a trail in bioengineering that could result, the Wall Street Journal reports, in human hearts, or parts of them, being grown in a lab and transplanted into live patients, within the next decade. It's all due to advances in technology that have seen organs such as bladders and windpipes grown and implanted into patients, replacing those that have been dama ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-closer-human-heart.htm

HEART - Simple breath test might diagnose heart failure
(HealthDay)-An experimental breath test, designed to quickly identify patients suffering from heart failure simply by analyzing the contents of a single exhaled breath, has demonstrated promise in early trials, a team of researchers says ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-simple-heart-failure.h

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Excess dietary salt identified as autoimmune trigger
For the past few decades, health officials have been reporting increases in the incidence of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Now researchers at Yale School of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute have identified a prime suspect in the mystery-dietary salt ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-excess-dietary-salt-au

LONGEVITY - Isolation, loneliness may raise death risk for elderly
(HealthDay)-Elderly people who are socially isolated and lonely may be at greater risk of early death, British researchers report ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-isolation-loneliness-d

NEWS - A 'micro-tap' for treating glaucoma
A tiny, EPFL-designed implantable device that can be positioned within the eye and controlled remotely may well revolutionize the treatment of glaucoma. The device should be through testing this year and on its way to the market in 2014 via Rheon Medical, an EPFL spin-off ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-micro-tap-glaucoma.htm

NEWS - Engineer invents bionic eye to help the blind
(Medical Xpress)-For UCLA bioengineering professor Wentai Liu, more than two decades of visionary research burst into the headlines last month when the FDA approved what it called "the first bionic eye for the blind. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-bionic-eye.htm

NEWS - How Toenail Clippings Could Solve a Toxic Mystery
Thirty years after a toxic chromium spill, New Jersey residents will find out if they have been exposed. -&gt ...
http://news.discovery.com/human/health/how-toenail-clippings

NEWS - Implantable telescope lens to treat macular degeneration
(Medical Xpress)-Retired entrepreneur Willis "James" Hindman, 77, always enjoyed raising and watching thoroughbred race horses run on his farm in Westminster, Md. "There is nothing more beautiful than seeing a horse in motion and at full speed. It's something very special to me," says Hindman ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-implantable-telescope-

NEWS - Michigan hospitals national leaders in preventing common and costly urinary tract infections
Patients at Michigan hospitals are less likely to experience a urinary tract infection caused by a catheter than at other hospitals in the country, according to a new study by the University of Michigan ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-michigan-hospitals-nat

NEWS - Resistance to antibiotics now kills more people than AIDS
Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-N.Y.) has reintroduced to Congress the Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act which aims to reduce the use of human antibiotics in animals and keep them working for human medicine ...
http://www.treehugger.com/corporate-responsibility/resistanc

NEWS - Reversing blood and freshening it up
The blood of young and old people differs. In an article published recently in the scientific journal Blood, a research group at Lund University in Sweden explain how they have succeeded in rejuvenating the blood of mice by reversing, or re-programming, the stem cells that produce blood ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-reversing-blood-freshe

NEWS - Study reveals new approach for stopping herpes infections
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have discovered a novel strategy for preventing infections due to the highly common herpes simplex viruses, the microbes responsible for causing genital herpes (herpes simplex virus 2) and cold sores (herpes simplex virus 1). The finding, published online by The FASEB Journal, could lead to new drugs for treating or suppressing herpes virus infections ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-reveals-approach-herpe

NEWS-CANCER - Coffee May Protect Alcoholics' Livers
For guys who drink alcohol, heavy coffee consumption may protect against liver damage, according to a new study from Finland. "Our findings suggest a possible protective effect for coffee intake in alcohol consumers," said study researcher Dr. Onni Niemelä, of Seinäjoki Central Hospital and the University of Tampere in Finland. The researchers asked nearly 19,000 Finnish men and womenbetween ages 25 and 74 about their coffee and alcohol co ...
coffee run, intern, Starbucks, caffeine
http://www.businessinsider.com/coffee-may-protect-alcoholics

NEWS-CANCER - Detecting circulating tumor cells
A proof-of-concept device is nearly perfect in separating breast cancer cells from blood ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-circulating-tumor-cell

NEWS-CANCER - Storming the gates: Study probes how pancreatic cancers metastasize
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have discovered that a protein found in the cells surrounding pancreatic cancers play a role in the spread of the disease to other parts of the body ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-storming-gates-probes-

NEWS-CANCER - T-cell therapy eradicates an aggressive leukemia in two children
Two children with an aggressive form of childhood leukemia had a complete remission of their disease-showing no evidence of cancer cells in their bodies-after treatment with a novel cell therapy that reprogrammed their immune cells to rapidly multiply and destroy leukemia cells. A research team from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania published the case report of two pediatric patients Online First today in ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-t-cell-therapy-eradica

NEWS-CANCER - Ultrasound to combat liver tumours
Liver tumours are either benign or malignant; if malignant then they can be primary or secondary. In Europe, a solitary lesion in the liver is more likely to be a metastatic carcinoma than a primary liver tumour. The major risk factors for liver cancer are infection with hepatitis B or C and heavy alcohol consumption, all of which can cause cirrhosis. Smokers and diabetics are also at increased risk, while consumption of foods contaminated with a ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-ultrasound-combat-live

PSYCHOLOGY - Parent induces guilt, child shows distress
The use of guilt-inducing parenting in daily parent-child interaction causes children distress still evident on the next day, emerges from the study Parents, teachers, and children's learning (LIGHT) carried out by Kaisa Aunola, Asko Tolvanenen, Jaana Viljaranta and Jari-Erik Nurmi at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. According to the study, the use of guilt-inducing parenting varied from one day to another. When parents used higher levels ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-parent-guilt-child-dis

PSYCHOLOGY - Too much choice leads to riskier decisions, new study finds
The more choices people have, the riskier the decisions they make, according to a new study which sheds light on how we behave when faced with large amounts of information ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-choice-riskier-decisio

PSYCHOLOGY - What We Expect From Ourselves And Others Often Becomes Reality
In the story told by the Roman poet Ovid, Pygmalion is a sculptor who falls in love with a statue he has created. George Bernard Shaw borrowed the theme for his play "Pygmalion"-later turned into the musical "My Fair Lady"-in which Professor Henry Higgins makes over the Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle, becoming besotted with her even as he teaches her how to speak proper English ("The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain . . . ").Psycholog ...
http://www.businessinsider.com/set-high-expectations-for-you

PSYCHOLOGY - Babies prefer individuals who harm those that aren't like them (w/ video)
Infants as young as nine months old prefer individuals who are nice to people like them and mean to people who aren't like them, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-babies-individuals-are

PSYCHOLOGY - Children who avoid scary situations likelier to have anxiety, research finds
Children who avoid situations they find scary are likely to have anxiety a Mayo Clinic study of more than 800 children ages 7 to 18 found. The study published this month in Behavior Therapy presents a new method of measuring avoidance behavior in young children ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-children-scary-situati

PSYCHOLOGY - Events in the future seem closer than those in the past, study shows
We say that time flies, it marches on, it flows like a river-our descriptions of time are closely linked to our experiences of moving through space. Now, new research suggests that the illusions that influence how we perceive movement through space also influence our perception of time. The findings provide evidence that our experiences of space and time have even more in common than previously thought ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-events-future-closer.h

SPIRITUALITY - Is the New Pope Green?
The newly elected pontiff's earlier ministry in Argentina, as well as statements he has made as pope, suggest Francis considers care for the Earth to be entwined with care for the poor ...
http://news.discovery.com/earth/global-warming/is-the-new-po

SPIRITUALITY - New Pope Spotlights Questions About Church's Relationship With Military Dictatorship
Pope Francis IThe election of Jorge Mario Cardinal Bergoglio as Pope Francis I has sparked new interest in the atrocities performed during Argentina's period of military rule from 1976-1983. Francis is the first pope to have been elected from the Americas, which will more accurately reflect the primacy of the Roman Catholic Church in Latin America. That primacy, however, during the Cold War led to many dioceses throughout the region turning a bl ...
http://thinkprogress.org/security/2013/03/13/1714301/pope-fr

SPIRITUALITY - Pope's resignation reshapes traditions
Benedict's decision to step down unnerves the usually plodding church leadership; cardinals have shown an unusual feistiness in the more open atmosphere.VATICAN CITY - Eight years ago, many of the men with red caps and red cloaks who walked into the Sistine Chapel to choose a pope seemed to be in a state of grief-shaped numbness ...
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-pope-moo

SPIRITUALITY - Research on the Politics of Meditation Points to Deeper Truths
People practice tantric yoga meditation. Photo by Gurumustuk Singh. There have been some fascinating studies about the effects of meditation in recent years. Buddhist monks and Trappist friars have been hooked up to EEG machines to record subtle changes in their brainwaves during their spiritual practices. Scores of clinical trials have also been conducted to assess the impact of meditation and prayer on physiological processes ...
Meditation retreat
http://www.yesmagazine.org/happiness/study-s-claims-about-po

VITAMINS - Vitamin D benefits breathing in tuberculosis patients
Maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D can help people breathe better and may even protect against tuberculosis (TB), according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-vitamin-d-benefits-tub

WEIGHT - Obesity may be linked to microorganisms living in the gut, study says
How much a person eats may be only one of many factors that determines weight gain. A recent Cedars-Sinai study suggests that a breath test profile of microorganisms inhabiting the gut may be able to tell doctors how susceptible a person is to developing obesity ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-obesity-linked-microor

WEIGHT - Probing question: Is being overweight always bad for your health?
Fat. Sugar. Salt. Americans have a love-hate relationship with these ingredients. We know we should consume them in moderation. After all, we've been told again and again that being overweight or obese can cause health problems. But they make foods taste so darn good! Can being overweight really be so bad ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-probing-overweight-bad