HEALTH PORTATION curated News April 29th

BRAIN - Children's brain processing speed indicates risk of psychosis
(Medical Xpress)-New research from Cardiff and Bristol universities shows that children whose brains process information more slowly than their peers are at greater risk of psychotic experiences ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-children-brain-psychos

BRAIN - Competing pathways affect early differentiation of higher brain structures
Sand-dwelling and rock-dwelling cichlids living in East Africa's Lake Malawi share a nearly identical genome, but have very different personalities. The territorial rock-dwellers live in communities where social interactions are important, while the sand-dwellers are itinerant and less aggressive ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-pathways-affect-early-

BRAIN - Dopamine regulates the motivation to act
The widespread belief that dopamine regulates pleasure could go down in history with the latest research results on the role of this neurotransmitter. Researchers have proved that it regulates motivation, causing individuals to initiate and persevere to obtain something either positive or negative ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-dopamine.htm

BRAIN - Holy Cow: Our Brains Are Actually Lopsided
Whether you're a left-brain or right-brain person, your lump of grey matter is probably uneven ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/sethporges/2013/04/29/holy-cow-o

COOK - Barley risotto with porcini mushrooms [Vegetarian]
This delicious grain makes a great risotto, especially when paired with hearty mushrooms and a mild feta cheese ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/barley-ris

COOK - Roasted Brussels sprouts with orange butter sauce [Vegetarian]
The wonderful flavor of roasted Brussels sprouts is paired with the bright, sweet taste of orange in this quick and simple recipe ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/roasted-br

COOK - Spicy roasted cauliflower with lemon honey dressing [Vegan]
This recipe calls for a few spices, and a lemony dressing tossed over roasted cauliflower -- that's it, and suddenly something as bland as cauliflower will knock your taste buds off ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/spicy-roas

COOK - Sweet and creamy one-ingredient ice cream in 5 minutes [Vegan]
There is one single ingredient needed for this thick, decadent ice cream. But the variety of flavors it makes is limited only by your imagination ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/sweet-and-

COOK - Warm wheatberry salad with mushrooms and white wine [Vegan]
The savory flavors of mushrooms and onions simmered in white wine lace the nutritious wheatberries in this delicious salad ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/warm-wheat

COOK - Weekday Vegetarian: Wild Leek Biscuits with Cracked Coriander Seeds
Two years ago my daughter and I set a bit of a challenge for ourselves for the month of May. We decided that we would not purchase any baked goods for the entire month. That included bread, cookies, cakes and pies. My husband brought home a loaf o ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/savory-wil

DIABETES - Gene variants link to insulin resistance based on diet
(HealthDay)-Variants of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) are associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, but only under particular dietary conditions, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes Care ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-gene-variants-link-ins

DIABETES - Report updates impact of hypoglycemia in diabetes
(HealthDay)-An update of the current state of knowledge about the impact of hypoglycemia on patients with diabetes reviews outcomes, strategies to prevent hypoglycemia, and current knowledge gaps, and has been published in the May issue of Diabetes Care ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-impact-hypoglycemia-di

DIABETES - Scientists make insulin-producing cells self-replicate
(Medical Xpress)-Scientists have discovered a hormone that causes the body's insulin-producing factories, beta cells, to churn out more of themselves. Having enough insulin is critical to regulating the amount of sugar in the blood ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-scientists-insulin-pro

FOODS - Juicing trend is pulp fiction for many, dietitian says
Fueled by a $5 billion dollar industry that continues to grow 5 to 8 percent annually, juicing is being promoted by many as a useful strategy for weight loss. But the trend of extracting the liquid from produce is not widely recommended within the medical and surgical weight-loss community ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-juicing-trend-pulp-fic

HEART - Cardio could hold key to cancer cure
Regular exercise has been proven to reduce the chance of developing liver cancer in a world-first mice study that carries hope for patients at risk from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-cardio-key-cancer.htm

HEART - Forthcoming study explores use of intermittent fasting in diabetes as cardiovascular disease
Intermittent fasting is all the rage, but scientific evidence showing how such regimes affect human health is not always clear cut. Now a scientific review in the British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease suggests that fasting diets may help those with diabetes and cardiovascular disease, alongside established weight loss claims ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-forthcoming-explores-i

HEART - Straight from the heart: An elastic patch that supports cardiac cell growth
(Medical Xpress)-Scientists are a step closer to being able to repair damaged human heart tissue thanks to a world leading research collaboration between the University of Sydney and Harvard University ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-straight-heart-elastic

HEART - Subclinical thyroid condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality
Having high thyroid activity, and even "high-normal" levels, is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to work which has received an award at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Copenhagen ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-subclinical-thyroid-co

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Finding a new way to manage infections
(Medical Xpress)-Waging an immunological war against a pathogen is not the body's only way to survive an infection. Sometimes tolerance, or learning to live with an invader, can be just as important. In tolerance the body lessens or repairs the damage that the pathogen causes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-infections.htm

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - New drug stimulates immune system to kill infected cells in animal model of hepatitis B infection
A novel drug developed by Gilead Sciences and tested in an animal model at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio suppresses hepatitis B virus infection by stimulating the immune system and inducing loss of infected cells ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-drug-immune-infected-c

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Yoga Changes Gene Expression, Improves Immunity
You're probably not thinking about gene expression while stretching into downward dog, but your genetic expression may in fact be changing for the better. Continue reading ↠...
http://news.discovery.com/human/health/yoga-benefits-immune-

METABOLISM - The biology of fats in the body
When you have your cholesterol checked, the doctor typically gives you levels of three fats found in the blood: LDL, HDL and triglycerides. But did you know your body contains thousands of other types of fats, or lipids ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-biology-fats-body.htm

NEWS - Drugs without side effects: Researchers explore novel ways to classify proteins
Janelle Leuthaeuser is on the cutting edge of biophysics. A molecular genetics and genomics Ph.D. student, she is part of a nationwide effort to create a more efficient generation of protein-based drugs ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-drugs-side-effects-exp

NEWS - Flu and bacteria: Better prognosis for this potentially fatal combination
Scientists from the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have provided insights into how much harm bacteria can cause to the lung of people having the flu. An infection with both the flu and bacteria can be a fatal combination. The results could prompt the development of alternative treatments for flu-related bacterial infections, to improve patient outcome and prevent permanent lung d ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-flu-bacteria-prognosis

NEWS - Hepatitis C screening for baby boomers
If you were born during 1945-1965, talk to your doctor about getting tested for hepatitis C. The word "hepatitis" means swelling of the liver. Hepatitis is most often caused by a virus. In the United States, the most common type of viral hepatitis is hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is primarily spread through contact with blood from an infected person. More than 15,000 Americans, most of them baby boomers, die each year from hepatitis C-related illness. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-hepatitis-screening-ba

NEWS - New recommendations in bedsharing debate
Researchers from Murdoch University's School of Health Professions are urging health organisations to reconsider their attitudes to mothers and babies bedsharing ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-bedsharing-debate.htm

NEWS - Physicians debate whether patients need to know they're dying
In the days when American physicians dispensed oracular commands and their judgments were rarely questioned, a doctor could take it upon himself with few ethical qualms to keep from a patient the bad news of a terminal diagnosis ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-physicians-debate-pati

NEWS - Protect your kids from pollen allergies: expert
(HealthDay)-Many children suffer allergies at this time of year as trees and other plants start releasing pollens into the air. So parents need to monitor their youngsters for symptoms, an expert says ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-kids-pollen-allergies-

NEWS - Subclinical thyroid condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality
Having high thyroid activity, and even "high-normal" levels, is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to work which has received an award at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Copenhagen ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-subclinical-thyroid-co

NEWS - Turkish womb transplant woman 6 weeks pregnant
A hospital says a Turkish woman who became the first person to successfully receive a donor womb is six weeks into a "healthy" pregnancy ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-turkish-womb-transplan

NEWS - Upper Arm Lifts Biggest Trend in Plastic Surgery
The plastic surgery procedure saw the biggest rise between 2000 and 2012, finds a new report ...
http://news.discovery.com/human/life/upper-arm-lifts-130429.

NEWS-CANCER - Battery of tests on cancer cells shows them as 'squishy,' yet tactically strong
A team of student researchers and their professors from 20 laboratories around the country have gotten a new view of cancer cells. The work could shed light on the transforming physical properties of these cells as they metastasize, said Jack R. Staunton, a Ph.D. candidate at Arizona State University in the lab of Prof. Robert Ros, and the lead author of a paper reporting on the topic ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-battery-cancer-cells-s

NEWS-CANCER - Cardio could hold key to cancer cure
Regular exercise has been proven to reduce the chance of developing liver cancer in a world-first mice study that carries hope for patients at risk from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-cardio-key-cancer.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Disrupting cell signals may lead to new cancer treatments
(Medical Xpress)-Scientists have taken a major step towards developing new treatments for certain cancers by disrupting the internal cellular signals that lead to the uncontrolled growth of cancerous cells ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-disrupting-cell-cancer

NEWS-CANCER - Novel screening tests for liver cancer
New data from two clinical trials presented today at the International Liver Congress 2013 demonstrate substantial improvements in the detection of both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC) using diagnostic urine tests ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-screening-liver-cancer

NEWS-CANCER - Physicists, biologists unite to expose how cancer spreads
(Medical Xpress)-Cancer cells that can break out of a tumor and invade other organs are more aggressive and nimble than nonmalignant cells, according to a new multi-institutional nationwide study. These cells exert greater force on their environment and can more easily maneuver small spaces ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-physicists-biologists-

NEWS-CANCER - Two-pronged approach to immune activation could lead to vaccines that effectively shut down tumor expansion
Tumor cells often express proteins that set them apart from their healthy neighbors. These very same proteins can also help the immune system to recognize and destroy the cancer. Several research groups and companies have already demonstrated proof-of-concept for antitumor therapeutic vaccines based on this principle, typically employing 'retrained' dendritic cells (DCs) harvested from a patient's own immune system. To date, however, such vaccine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-two-pronged-approach-i

PSYCHOLOGY - Ear-witness precision: Congenitally blind people have more accurate memories, research finds
(Medical Xpress)-Researchers from the University of Bath have found that people who are congenitally blind have more accurate memories than those who are sighted ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-ear-witness-precision-

PSYCHOLOGY - Study finds men most attractive with heavy-stubble
(Medical Xpress)-A research team from the Evolution and Ecology Research Centre at the University of New South Wales has found that women find men most attractive when they have approximately ten days of beard growth. In their paper published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior, the team describes how volunteers asked to look at pictures of men with various stages of beard growth, found men with ten days growth to be the most attractive a ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-men-heavy-stubble.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - This Number Shows The Problem With Dove's 'Real Beauty Sketches' Video
While almost 34 million people have viewed Dove's heartwarming "Real Beauty Sketches" video in just two weeks, marketing analysts are wondering if the campaign will actually sell soap. An impromptu survey of 100 random women in New York City by RAPP global chief strategy officer Loren Grossman provided some numbers that should scare the company: 70% of women couldn't identify that Dove made the video. "It's hardly a definitive sample, I know, but ...
dove sketch artist
http://www.businessinsider.com/the-problem-with-doves-real-b

SLEEP - Good night's sleep linked to happiness
(Medical Xpress)-Want a good night's sleep? Be positive - consistently. Although happiness is generally good for sleeping, when a person's happiness varies a lot in reaction to daily ups and downs, sleep suffers, reports a Cornell study published online in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-good-night-linked-happ

VITAMINS - Vitamins may ease diabetes symptoms, study finds
(Medical Xpress)-Vitamin therapy is a promising avenue to improving symptoms of pain, tingling and numbness in hands and feet typical of diabetic neuropathy, a study by Tulane University researchers concluded ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-vitamins-ease-diabetes

WATERS - Aubrey McClendon Is Now Hiring
If you work in the oil and gas business then here's a chance to get in on the ground floor of something big ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherhelman/2013/04/27/aub

WEIGHT - National survey highlights perceived importance of dietary protein to prevent weight gain
Atkins Diet, Zone Diet, South Beach Diet, etc., etc., etc. Chances are you have known someone who has tried a high protein diet. In fact, according to the International Food Information Council Foundation, 50% of consumers were interested in including more protein in their diets and 37% believed protein helps with weight loss. In a new study released in the May/June 2013 issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, researchers found ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-national-survey-highli

WEIGHT - Obesity may influence heart function through sex hormones
New research suggests that changes in sex hormones as seen in obesity may have possible effects on the heart. The study by researchers from Belgium, presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Copenhagen, Denmark, suggests effects on heart function in healthy men with artificially raised oestrogen levels and artificially lowered testosterone levels to mimic an obese state ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-obesity-heart-function

WEIGHT - Pigment in the eye found to be key between obesity, vision loss
"Eat your veggies" has been an admonition of parents through the ages, but newly published brain research from the University of Georgia provides one of the best reasons why ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-pigment-eye-key-obesit

WEIGHT - Weight loss programs via virtual reality
Weight loss is a topic of concern for nearly 36% of Americans who are considered obese. There are many barriers that can interfere with weight loss. For those attending face-to-face weight loss programs, barriers can include travel, conflict with work and home, need for childcare, and loss of anonymity ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-weight-loss-virtual-re

BRAIN - Children's brain processing speed indicates risk of psychosis

(Medical Xpress)-New research from Cardiff and Bristol universities shows that children whose brains process information more slowly than their peers are at greater risk of psychotic experiences.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-children-brain-psychosis.htm

BRAIN - Competing pathways affect early differentiation of higher brain structures

Sand-dwelling and rock-dwelling cichlids living in East Africa's Lake Malawi share a nearly identical genome, but have very different personalities. The territorial rock-dwellers live in communities where social interactions are important, while the sand-dwellers are itinerant and less aggressive.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-pathways-affect-early-differenti

BRAIN - Dopamine regulates the motivation to act

The widespread belief that dopamine regulates pleasure could go down in history with the latest research results on the role of this neurotransmitter. Researchers have proved that it regulates motivation, causing individuals to initiate and persevere to obtain something either positive or negative.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-dopamine.htm

BRAIN - Holy Cow: Our Brains Are Actually Lopsided

Whether you're a left-brain or right-brain person, your lump of grey matter is probably uneven.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/sethporges/2013/04/29/holy-cow-our-brains-

COOK - Barley risotto with porcini mushrooms [Vegetarian]

This delicious grain makes a great risotto, especially when paired with hearty mushrooms and a mild feta cheese.

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/barley-risotto-with-

DIABETES - Gene variants link to insulin resistance based on diet

(HealthDay)-Variants of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) are associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, but only under particular dietary conditions, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes Care.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-gene-variants-link-insulin-resis

DIABETES - Report updates impact of hypoglycemia in diabetes

(HealthDay)-An update of the current state of knowledge about the impact of hypoglycemia on patients with diabetes reviews outcomes, strategies to prevent hypoglycemia, and current knowledge gaps, and has been published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-impact-hypoglycemia-diabetes.htm

DIABETES - Scientists make insulin-producing cells self-replicate

(Medical Xpress)-Scientists have discovered a hormone that causes the body's insulin-producing factories, beta cells, to churn out more of themselves. Having enough insulin is critical to regulating the amount of sugar in the blood.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-scientists-insulin-producing-cel

FOODS - Juicing trend is pulp fiction for many, dietitian says

Fueled by a $5 billion dollar industry that continues to grow 5 to 8 percent annually, juicing is being promoted by many as a useful strategy for weight loss. But the trend of extracting the liquid from produce is not widely recommended within the medical and surgical weight-loss community.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-juicing-trend-pulp-fiction-dieti

HEART - Cardio could hold key to cancer cure

Regular exercise has been proven to reduce the chance of developing liver cancer in a world-first mice study that carries hope for patients at risk from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-cardio-key-cancer.htm

HEART - Forthcoming study explores use of intermittent fasting in diabetes as cardiovascular disease

Intermittent fasting is all the rage, but scientific evidence showing how such regimes affect human health is not always clear cut. Now a scientific review in the British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease suggests that fasting diets may help those with diabetes and cardiovascular disease, alongside established weight loss claims.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-forthcoming-explores-intermitten

HEART - Straight from the heart: An elastic patch that supports cardiac cell growth

(Medical Xpress)-Scientists are a step closer to being able to repair damaged human heart tissue thanks to a world leading research collaboration between the University of Sydney and Harvard University.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-straight-heart-elastic-patch-car

HEART - Subclinical thyroid condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality

Having high thyroid activity, and even "high-normal" levels, is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to work which has received an award at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Copenhagen.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-subclinical-thyroid-condition-ca

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Finding a new way to manage infections

(Medical Xpress)-Waging an immunological war against a pathogen is not the body's only way to survive an infection. Sometimes tolerance, or learning to live with an invader, can be just as important. In tolerance the body lessens or repairs the damage that the pathogen causes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-infections.htm

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - New drug stimulates immune system to kill infected cells in animal model of hepatitis B infection

A novel drug developed by Gilead Sciences and tested in an animal model at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio suppresses hepatitis B virus infection by stimulating the immune system and inducing loss of infected cells.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-drug-immune-infected-cells-anima

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Yoga Changes Gene Expression, Improves Immunity

You're probably not thinking about gene expression while stretching into downward dog, but your genetic expression may in fact be changing for the better. Continue reading →

http://news.discovery.com/human/health/yoga-benefits-immune-system-cha

METABOLISM - The biology of fats in the body

When you have your cholesterol checked, the doctor typically gives you levels of three fats found in the blood: LDL, HDL and triglycerides. But did you know your body contains thousands of other types of fats, or lipids?

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-biology-fats-body.htm

NEWS - Drugs without side effects: Researchers explore novel ways to classify proteins

Janelle Leuthaeuser is on the cutting edge of biophysics. A molecular genetics and genomics Ph.D. student, she is part of a nationwide effort to create a more efficient generation of protein-based drugs.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-drugs-side-effects-explore-ways.

NEWS - Flu and bacteria: Better prognosis for this potentially fatal combination

Scientists from the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have provided insights into how much harm bacteria can cause to the lung of people having the flu. An infection with both the flu and bacteria can be a fatal combination. The results could prompt the development of alternative treatments for flu-related bacterial infections, to improve patient outcome and prevent permanent lung damage. The study is published in the renown journal Science.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-flu-bacteria-prognosis-potential

NEWS - Hepatitis C screening for baby boomers

If you were born during 1945-1965, talk to your doctor about getting tested for hepatitis C. The word "hepatitis" means swelling of the liver. Hepatitis is most often caused by a virus. In the United States, the most common type of viral hepatitis is hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is primarily spread through contact with blood from an infected person. More than 15,000 Americans, most of them baby boomers, die each year from hepatitis C-related illness. Deaths related to hepatitis C have been on the rise and are expected to increase.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-hepatitis-screening-baby-boomers

NEWS - New recommendations in bedsharing debate

Researchers from Murdoch University's School of Health Professions are urging health organisations to reconsider their attitudes to mothers and babies bedsharing.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-bedsharing-debate.htm

NEWS - Physicians debate whether patients need to know they're dying

In the days when American physicians dispensed oracular commands and their judgments were rarely questioned, a doctor could take it upon himself with few ethical qualms to keep from a patient the bad news of a terminal diagnosis.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-physicians-debate-patients-theyr

NEWS - Protect your kids from pollen allergies: expert

(HealthDay)-Many children suffer allergies at this time of year as trees and other plants start releasing pollens into the air. So parents need to monitor their youngsters for symptoms, an expert says.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-kids-pollen-allergies-expert.htm

NEWS - Subclinical thyroid condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality

Having high thyroid activity, and even "high-normal" levels, is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to work which has received an award at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Copenhagen.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-subclinical-thyroid-condition-ca

NEWS - Turkish womb transplant woman 6 weeks pregnant

A hospital says a Turkish woman who became the first person to successfully receive a donor womb is six weeks into a "healthy" pregnancy.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-turkish-womb-transplant-woman-we

NEWS - Upper Arm Lifts Biggest Trend in Plastic Surgery

The plastic surgery procedure saw the biggest rise between 2000 and 2012, finds a new report.

http://news.discovery.com/human/life/upper-arm-lifts-130429.htm#mkcpgn

NEWS-CANCER - Battery of tests on cancer cells shows them as 'squishy,' yet tactically strong

A team of student researchers and their professors from 20 laboratories around the country have gotten a new view of cancer cells. The work could shed light on the transforming physical properties of these cells as they metastasize, said Jack R. Staunton, a Ph.D. candidate at Arizona State University in the lab of Prof. Robert Ros, and the lead author of a paper reporting on the topic.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-battery-cancer-cells-squishy-tac

NEWS-CANCER - Cardio could hold key to cancer cure

Regular exercise has been proven to reduce the chance of developing liver cancer in a world-first mice study that carries hope for patients at risk from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-cardio-key-cancer.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Disrupting cell signals may lead to new cancer treatments

(Medical Xpress)-Scientists have taken a major step towards developing new treatments for certain cancers by disrupting the internal cellular signals that lead to the uncontrolled growth of cancerous cells.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-disrupting-cell-cancer-treatment

NEWS-CANCER - Novel screening tests for liver cancer

New data from two clinical trials presented today at the International Liver Congress 2013 demonstrate substantial improvements in the detection of both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC) using diagnostic urine tests.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-screening-liver-cancer.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Physicists, biologists unite to expose how cancer spreads

(Medical Xpress)-Cancer cells that can break out of a tumor and invade other organs are more aggressive and nimble than nonmalignant cells, according to a new multi-institutional nationwide study. These cells exert greater force on their environment and can more easily maneuver small spaces.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-physicists-biologists-expose-can

NEWS-CANCER - Two-pronged approach to immune activation could lead to vaccines that effectively shut down tumor expansion

Tumor cells often express proteins that set them apart from their healthy neighbors. These very same proteins can also help the immune system to recognize and destroy the cancer. Several research groups and companies have already demonstrated proof-of-concept for antitumor therapeutic vaccines based on this principle, typically employing 'retrained' dendritic cells (DCs) harvested from a patient's own immune system. To date, however, such vaccines have demonstrated only limited effectiveness in beating back tumor progression. Shin-ichiro Fujii, Kanako Shimizu and colleagues from the RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology have now revealed research that could supercharge the potency of future cancer vaccines.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-two-pronged-approach-immune-vacc

PSYCHOLOGY - Ear-witness precision: Congenitally blind people have more accurate memories, research finds

(Medical Xpress)-Researchers from the University of Bath have found that people who are congenitally blind have more accurate memories than those who are sighted.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-ear-witness-precision-congenital

PSYCHOLOGY - Study finds men most attractive with heavy-stubble

(Medical Xpress)-A research team from the Evolution and Ecology Research Centre at the University of New South Wales has found that women find men most attractive when they have approximately ten days of beard growth. In their paper published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior, the team describes how volunteers asked to look at pictures of men with various stages of beard growth, found men with ten days growth to be the most attractive and those with five days growth to be the least.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-men-heavy-stubble.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - This Number Shows The Problem With Dove's 'Real Beauty Sketches' Video

While almost 34 million people have viewed Dove's heartwarming "Real Beauty Sketches" video in just two weeks, marketing analysts are wondering if the campaign will actually sell soap. An impromptu survey of 100 random women in New York City by RAPP global chief strategy officer Loren Grossman provided some numbers that should scare the company: 70% of women couldn't identify that Dove made the video. "It's hardly a definitive sample, I know, but ...

dove sketch artist

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-problem-with-doves-real-beauty-sket

SLEEP - Good night's sleep linked to happiness

(Medical Xpress)-Want a good night's sleep? Be positive - consistently. Although happiness is generally good for sleeping, when a person's happiness varies a lot in reaction to daily ups and downs, sleep suffers, reports a Cornell study published online in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-good-night-linked-happiness.htm

VITAMINS - Vitamins may ease diabetes symptoms, study finds

(Medical Xpress)-Vitamin therapy is a promising avenue to improving symptoms of pain, tingling and numbness in hands and feet typical of diabetic neuropathy, a study by Tulane University researchers concluded.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-vitamins-ease-diabetes-symptoms.

WATERS - Aubrey McClendon Is Now Hiring

If you work in the oil and gas business then here's a chance to get in on the ground floor of something big.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherhelman/2013/04/27/aubrey-mcclen

WEIGHT - National survey highlights perceived importance of dietary protein to prevent weight gain

Atkins Diet, Zone Diet, South Beach Diet, etc., etc., etc. Chances are you have known someone who has tried a high protein diet. In fact, according to the International Food Information Council Foundation, 50% of consumers were interested in including more protein in their diets and 37% believed protein helps with weight loss. In a new study released in the May/June 2013 issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, researchers found a relatively high proportion of women who reported using the practice of ''eating more protein'' to prevent weight gain, which was associated with reported weight loss.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-national-survey-highlights-impor

WEIGHT - Obesity may influence heart function through sex hormones

New research suggests that changes in sex hormones as seen in obesity may have possible effects on the heart. The study by researchers from Belgium, presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Copenhagen, Denmark, suggests effects on heart function in healthy men with artificially raised oestrogen levels and artificially lowered testosterone levels to mimic an obese state.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-obesity-heart-function-sex-hormo

WEIGHT - Pigment in the eye found to be key between obesity, vision loss

"Eat your veggies" has been an admonition of parents through the ages, but newly published brain research from the University of Georgia provides one of the best reasons why.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-pigment-eye-key-obesity-vision.h

WEIGHT - Weight loss programs via virtual reality

Weight loss is a topic of concern for nearly 36% of Americans who are considered obese. There are many barriers that can interfere with weight loss. For those attending face-to-face weight loss programs, barriers can include travel, conflict with work and home, need for childcare, and loss of anonymity.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-weight-loss-virtual-reality.htm

HEALTH PORTATION curated News April 26th

BRAIN - Key mechanism for a common form of Alzheimer's disease discovered
Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in collaboration with researchers from Icelandic Heart Association, Sage Bionetworks, and other institutions, have discovered that a network of genes involved in the inflammatory response in the brain is a crucial mechanism driving Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease (LOAD). The findings, published online today in the journal Cell, provide new understanding of key pathways and genes involved ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-key-mechanism-common-a

BRAIN - Missing link in Parkinson's disease found
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have described a missing link in understanding how damage to the body's cellular power plants leads to Parkinson's disease and, perhaps surprisingly, to some forms of heart failure ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-link-parkinson-disease

BRAIN - New hope for Autistic children who never learn to speak
An Autistica consultation published this month found that 24% of children with autism were non-verbal or minimally verbal, and it is known that these problems can persist into adulthood. Professionals have long attempted to support the development of language in these children but with mixed outcomes. An estimated 600,000 people in the UK and 70 million worldwide have autism, a neuro-developmental condition which is life-long ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-autistic-children.htm

BRAIN - Scientists create novel approach to find RNAs involved in long-term memory storage
(Phys.org) -Despite decades of research, relatively little is known about the identity of RNA molecules that are transported as part of the molecular process underpinning learning and memory. Now, working together, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Columbia University and the University of Florida, Gainesville, have developed a novel strategy for isolating and characterizing a substantial number of RNAs ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-scientists-approach-rn
COOK - Roasted cauliflower with olives and rosemary [Vegetarian]
Oven-roased cauliflower paired with your favorite olives and the savory flavor of rosemary is a simple and unique dish ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/roasted-ca

COOK - Savory wild leek biscuits with cracked coriander seeds [Vegetarian]
These savory biscuits are a hit for breakfast, lunch or dinner. And they're quick and easy to make ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/savory-wil
COOK - Weekday Vegetarian: Wild Leek Biscuits with Cracked Coriander Seeds
Two years ago my daughter and I set a bit of a challenge for ourselves for the month of May. We decided that we would not purchase any baked goods for the entire month. That included bread, cookies, cakes and pies. My husband brought home a loaf o ...

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/savory-wil

DIABETES - Diabetes self-care improves slowly, US report finds
(HealthDay)- More Americans are meeting diabetes care goals, but nearly half still aren't achieving major targets for controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol, government health officials say ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-diabetes-self-care-slo

DIABETES - Drinking one 12oz sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by 22 percent
Drinking one (or one extra)* 12oz serving size of sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can be enough to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 22%, a new study suggests. The research is published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) and comes from data in the InterAct consortium**. The research is by Dr Dora Romaguera, Dr Petra Wark and Dr Teresa Norat, Imperial College London, UK, and collea ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-12oz-sugar-sweetened-s

DIABETES - Harvard Scientists Discover Hormone That Could Help Treat Diabetes
Researchers at Harvard Stem Cell Institute have discovered a hormone that could dramatically improve treatments for Type 2 diabetes ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnfarrell/2013/04/25/harvard-s

DIABETES - New treatment may lead the way to fighting obesity and diabetes
Two professors believe they may have a promising lead from which to develop a new treatment for obesity and diabetes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-treatment-obesity-diab

DIABETES - Potential diabetes breakthrough: Researchers discover new hormone spurring beta cell production
Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. The researchers believe that the hormone might also have a role in treating type 1, or juvenile, diabetes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-potential-diabetes-bre

FOODS - What does seasonal eating look like where you live?
TreeHugger writers dish the dirt on what's seasonal in their neck of the woods right now ...
http://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/green-food/whats-season

HEART - Study shows gut bacteria byproduct predicts heart attack and stroke
A microbial byproduct of intestinal bacteria contributes to heart disease and serves as an accurate screening tool for predicting future risks of heart attack, stroke and death in persons not otherwise identified by traditional risk factors and blood tests, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-gut-bacteria-byproduct

HERBS - Researchers confirm pine bark extract could reduce cataract risk
(Medical Xpress)-A winter after discovering Canada for France, Jacques Cartier's exploration crew started suffering and dying from the dreadful scurvy disease in 1535. But thanks to an Iroquoian healer, they were miraculously cured by a tea made from pine bark ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-bark-cataract.htm

NEWS - 'Off-the-shelf' artificial blood vessels show promise
(HealthDay)-Artificial blood vessels may one day reduce some complications of dialysis treatment in people with kidney failure, according to the results of early research in animals ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-off-the-shelf-artifici

NEWS - As people live longer and reproduce less, natural selection keeps up
In many places around the world, people are living longer and are having fewer children. But that's not all. A study of people living in rural Gambia shows that this modern-day "demographic transition" may lead women to be taller and slimmer, too ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130425132614.ht

NEWS - Body size conveyed by voice determines vocal attractiveness
Deep male voices and high-pitched female voices are perceived as more attractive because listeners gauge the speaker's body size from the frequency of their voice, according to research published April 24 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Yi Xu from University College London (UK) and colleagues ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-body-size-conveyed-voi

NEWS - Can Oxytocin Get Me A Boyfriend?
Can the hormone oxytocin make you fall in love? © Valentyn Oleinikov | Dreamstime.comA personal experiment with the love hormone We met up at a dim sum place in Chinatown. He smiled when he saw me, and I gave him a long hug. Already, there was none of the stiff awkwardness that had plagued our first two dates. What my companion didn't know was that minutes before arriving at the restaurant, I had inhaled two puffs of oxytocin, a polypeptide hor ...
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-04/can-oxytocin-g

NEWS - How 4 Nerds Discovered The DNA Helix 60 Years Ago Today
Letter Francis Crick wrote to his son in 1953 Christie's via io9From the Popular Science archive, the story of how Watson, Crick, Wilkins, and Franklin worked out the structure of life. "DNA: It Calls the Signals of Life," by Wallace Cloud and excerpted below, originally appeared in the May 1963 issue of Popular Science magazine. Francis Crick and James Watson first described the double helix structure of DNA on April 25, 1953.--Ed Last December ...
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-04/how-four-nerds

NEWS - New study examines cost-effectiveness of helicopter transport of trauma victims
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have for the first time determined how often emergency medical helicopters need to help save the lives of seriously injured people to be considered cost-effective compared with ground ambulances ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-cost-effectiveness-hel

NEWS - Official: GM gives $100k to Red Cross for Texas-like emergencies
Filed under: Etc., GMThe General Motors Foundation has provided a $100,000 grant to the American Red Cross to assist with relief efforts in West, Texas. Last Wednesday, the fertilizer plant in the town of 2,800 people caught fire and then exploded, the blowup registering as a 2.1-magnitude earthquake and felt up to 45 miles away. Fourteen people died, ten of them the firefighters and first responders who were there to put out the fire and get peo ...
http://www.autoblog.com/2013/04/24/gm-gives-100k-to-red-cros

NEWS - Study finds material loss protects teeth against fatigue failure
(Medical Xpress)-Scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the Senckenberg Research Institute in Frankfurt together with dental technicians have digitally analysed modern human teeth using an engineering approach, finite element method, to evaluate the biomechanical behaviour of teeth under realistic loading. They report results, showing that very widespread loss of dental material (enamel and dentine) at ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-material-loss-teeth-fa

NEWS - The White House's Latest Drug Policy Plan Is Actually Based On Science
Obama Loves Science President Obama at the 2012 White House Science Fair YouTubeAmerica's drug czar has announced that the nation's drug policy should be governed by neuroscience, not politics. In the U.S., how the government approaches drugs has very little to do with science. The War on Drugs has put the focus on incarceration and enforcement, not on the public health aspects of addiction. We classify drugs based on politics, rather than their ...
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-04/white-houses-l

NEWS - UCSB researcher studies hormone levels and sexual motivation among young women
Feeling frisky? If so, chances are greater your estrogen level -- and, perhaps, fertility -- are hitting their monthly peak. If not, you're more likely experiencing a profusion of desire-deadening progesterone, and the less fertile time in your cycle. Oh, the power of hormones ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-ucsb-hormone-sexual-yo


NEWS-CANCER - Coffee may help prevent breast cancer returning, study finds
Drinking coffee could decrease the risk of breast cancer recurring in patients taking the widely used drug Tamoxifen, a study has found. Patients who took the pill, along with two or more cups of coffee daily, reported less than half the rate of cancer recurrence, compared with their Tamoxifen-taking counterparts who drank one cup or less ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130425091345.ht

NEWS-CANCER - Coffee may help prevent breast cancer returning, study finds
Drinking coffee could decrease the risk of breast cancer recurring in patients taking the widely used drug Tamoxifen, a study at Lund University in Sweden has found. Patients who took the pill, along with two or more cups of coffee daily, reported less than half the rate of cancer recurrence, compared with their Tamoxifen-taking counterparts who drank one cup or less ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-coffee-breast-cancer.h

NEWS-CANCER - Inhibiting enzymes in the cell may lead to development and proliferation of cancer cells
Blocking certain enzymes in the cell may prevent cancer cell division and growth, according to new findings ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130425132643.ht

NEWS-CANCER - New advances in the management of patients with cirrhosis
New data from clinical studies presented for the first time at the International Liver Congress 2013 provide new rationale for an old and established treatment option for portal hypertension. Additionally, spleen stiffness predicts the occurrence of clinical complications, which is of paramount importance in clinical practice ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-advances-patients-cirr

NEWS-CANCER - Study shows potential new way to detect colorectal and other cancers
A unique new study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers Guo-Min Li and Libya Gu, in collaboration with Dr. Wei Yang at National Institutes of Health, reveals a novel mechanism explaining the previously unknown root cause of some forms of colorectal cancers ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-potential-colorectal-c

NEWS-CANCER - Using microbubbles to improve cancer therapy
Microbubbles decrease the time and acoustic power of ultrasound required to heat and destroy an embedded target, finds research in BioMed Central's open access journal Journal of Therapeutic Ultrasound. If these results can be replicated in the clinic, microbubbles could improve the efficiency of high intensity ultrasound treatment of solid tumors ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-microbubbles-cancer-th

PAIN - Researchers investigate 'the influence of the family' on back pain sufferers
Researchers at the University of Huddersfield have published a research paper that focuses on the social factors involved in back pain sufferers returning to work, to give a wider context to the medical factors that are often considered ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-family-pain.htm

PSYCHOLOGY - Faith in God positively influences treatment for individuals with psychiatric illness
Belief in God may significantly improve the outcome of those receiving short-term treatment for psychiatric illness, according to a recent study conducted by McLean Hospital investigators ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-faith-god-positively-t

PSYCHOLOGY - Humans Can Feel Empathy Toward Robots
Brain scans show we feel bad for robots when they're mistreated. Humans feel bad when they see other humans being mistreated, but do we feel the same way about robots? A team of researchers tested that by being first sweet and then really, really cruel to a poor little innocent dinosaur robot. The subjects in the study were shown two videos: in one, scientists acted affectionately toward the robot dinosaur, but in the second, they downri ...
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-04/humans-can-fee

PSYCHOLOGY - Poor parenting -- including overprotection -- increases bullying risk
Children who are exposed to negative parenting -- including abuse, neglect but also overprotection -- are more likely to experience childhood bullying by their peers, according to a meta-analysis of 70 studies of more than 200,000 children ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130425214005.ht

PSYCHOLOGY - Psychopaths are not neurally equipped to have concern for others, study shows
Prisoners who are psychopaths lack the basic neurophysiological "hardwiring" that enables them to care for others, according to a new study by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago and the University of New Mexico ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-psychopaths-neurally-e

VITAMINS - Sunshine hormone, vitamin D, may offer hope for treating liver fibrosis
Liver fibrosis results from an excessive accumulation of tough, fibrous scar tissue and occurs in most types of chronic liver diseases. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver injury leading to fibrosis include chronic hepatitis virus infection, excess alcohol consumption and, increasingly, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-sunshine-hormone-vitam

WEIGHT - New studies prove lethal link between alcohol, weight
Research announced today at the International Liver Congress 2013 has revealed the deadly impact that alcohol and body weight have on liver disease ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-lethal-link-alcohol-we

WEIGHT - New study confirms link between weight loss and blood pressure for individuals with specific genetic polymorphisms
Your genetic makeup can help determine how well your body will respond to weight loss efforts aimed at controlling high blood pressure, a new study confirms ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130425164407.ht

WEIGHT - Roundworm quells obesity and related metabolic disorders
Researchers have shown in a mouse model that infection with nematodes (also known as roundworms) can not only combat obesity but ameliorate related metabolic disorders ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130425164504.ht

WEIGHT - Roundworm quells obesity and related metabolic disorders
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, have shown in a mouse model that infection with nematodes (also known as roundworms) can not only combat obesity but ameliorate related metabolic disorders. Their research is published ahead of print online in the journal Infection and Immunity ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-roundworm-quells-obesi

WEIGHT - Weight loss counseling lifts depression in new study
(Medical Xpress)-Women struggling with clinical depression and obesity should consider a comprehensive weight loss program to significantly boost their mood, according to new research out of UMass Medical School published in the International Journal of Obesity ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-weight-loss-depression

BRAIN - Key mechanism for a common form of Alzheimer's disease discovered

Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in collaboration with researchers from Icelandic Heart Association, Sage Bionetworks, and other institutions, have discovered that a network of genes involved in the inflammatory response in the brain is a crucial mechanism driving Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease (LOAD). The findings, published online today in the journal Cell, provide new understanding of key pathways and genes involved in LOAD and valuable insights to develop potential therapies for the disease.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-key-mechanism-common-alzheimer-d

BRAIN - Missing link in Parkinson's disease found

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have described a missing link in understanding how damage to the body's cellular power plants leads to Parkinson's disease and, perhaps surprisingly, to some forms of heart failure.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-link-parkinson-disease.htm

BRAIN - New hope for Autistic children who never learn to speak

An Autistica consultation published this month found that 24% of children with autism were non-verbal or minimally verbal, and it is known that these problems can persist into adulthood. Professionals have long attempted to support the development of language in these children but with mixed outcomes. An estimated 600,000 people in the UK and 70 million worldwide have autism, a neuro-developmental condition which is life-long.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-autistic-children.htm

BRAIN - Scientists create novel approach to find RNAs involved in long-term memory storage

(Phys.org) -Despite decades of research, relatively little is known about the identity of RNA molecules that are transported as part of the molecular process underpinning learning and memory. Now, working together, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Columbia University and the University of Florida, Gainesville, have developed a novel strategy for isolating and characterizing a substantial number of RNAs transported from the cell-body of neuron (nerve cell) to the synapse, the small gap separating neurons that enables cell to cell communication.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-scientists-approach-rnas-involve

COOK - Roasted cauliflower with olives and rosemary [Vegetarian]

Oven-roased cauliflower paired with your favorite olives and the savory flavor of rosemary is a simple and unique dish.

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/roasted-cauliflower-

COOK - Savory wild leek biscuits with cracked coriander seeds [Vegetarian]

These savory biscuits are a hit for breakfast, lunch or dinner. And they're quick and easy to make!

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/savory-wild-leek-bis

DIABETES - Diabetes self-care improves slowly, US report finds

(HealthDay)- More Americans are meeting diabetes care goals, but nearly half still aren't achieving major targets for controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol, government health officials say.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-diabetes-self-care-slowly.htm

DIABETES - Drinking one 12oz sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by 22 percent

Drinking one (or one extra)* 12oz serving size of sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can be enough to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 22%, a new study suggests. The research is published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) and comes from data in the InterAct consortium**. The research is by Dr Dora Romaguera, Dr Petra Wark and Dr Teresa Norat, Imperial College London, UK, and colleagues.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-12oz-sugar-sweetened-soft-day-di

DIABETES - Harvard Scientists Discover Hormone That Could Help Treat Diabetes

Researchers at Harvard Stem Cell Institute have discovered a hormone that could dramatically improve treatments for Type 2 diabetes.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnfarrell/2013/04/25/harvard-scientists-

DIABETES - New treatment may lead the way to fighting obesity and diabetes

Two professors believe they may have a promising lead from which to develop a new treatment for obesity and diabetes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-treatment-obesity-diabetes.htm

DIABETES - Potential diabetes breakthrough: Researchers discover new hormone spurring beta cell production

Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. The researchers believe that the hormone might also have a role in treating type 1, or juvenile, diabetes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-potential-diabetes-breakthrough-

FOODS - What does seasonal eating look like where you live?

TreeHugger writers dish the dirt on what's seasonal in their neck of the woods right now.

http://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/green-food/whats-seasonal-where-y

HEART - Study shows gut bacteria byproduct predicts heart attack and stroke

A microbial byproduct of intestinal bacteria contributes to heart disease and serves as an accurate screening tool for predicting future risks of heart attack, stroke and death in persons not otherwise identified by traditional risk factors and blood tests, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-gut-bacteria-byproduct-heart.htm

HERBS - Researchers confirm pine bark extract could reduce cataract risk

(Medical Xpress)-A winter after discovering Canada for France, Jacques Cartier's exploration crew started suffering and dying from the dreadful scurvy disease in 1535. But thanks to an Iroquoian healer, they were miraculously cured by a tea made from pine bark.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-bark-cataract.htm

NEWS - 'Off-the-shelf' artificial blood vessels show promise

(HealthDay)-Artificial blood vessels may one day reduce some complications of dialysis treatment in people with kidney failure, according to the results of early research in animals.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-off-the-shelf-artificial-blood-v

NEWS - As people live longer and reproduce less, natural selection keeps up

In many places around the world, people are living longer and are having fewer children. But that's not all. A study of people living in rural Gambia shows that this modern-day "demographic transition" may lead women to be taller and slimmer, too.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130425132614.ht

NEWS - Body size conveyed by voice determines vocal attractiveness

Deep male voices and high-pitched female voices are perceived as more attractive because listeners gauge the speaker's body size from the frequency of their voice, according to research published April 24 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Yi Xu from University College London (UK) and colleagues.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-body-size-conveyed-voice-vocal.h

NEWS - Can Oxytocin Get Me A Boyfriend?

Can the hormone oxytocin make you fall in love? © Valentyn Oleinikov | Dreamstime.com
A personal experiment with the love hormone

We met up at a dim sum place in Chinatown. He smiled when he saw me, and I gave him a long hug. Already, there was none of the stiff awkwardness that had plagued our first two dates. What my companion didn't know was that minutes before arriving at the restaurant, I had inhaled two puffs of oxytocin, a polypeptide hormone that might be the biological basis for love.

The brain releases oxytocin into the bloodstream during physical contact such as stroking, hugging, and sex. When this happens, blood pressure lowers and you feel calm, safe, and trusting. As a part of the body's anti-stress system, it works as a mirror to adrenalin, the hormone associated with the fight-or-flight response. I was researching oxytocin for an article about the science of love, and I decided to conduct a little experiment: Could taking the hormone before a date make me fall in love?

* * *

I ordered the $60 bottle of OxytocinFactor from ABC Nutriceuticals, one of a handful of companies that sells the hormone as a nasal spray. Three days later, a box containing 30 milliliters of oxytocin arrived at my doorstep from Boise, Idaho. The packaging read, "The hormone that makes love and relationship possible." Bryan Post, the owner of the company, told me that he tested his product on "himself, his mother and 30 other people." He claims the drug isn't addictive, and it won't get you high-it just "lowers your anxiety."

For decades after its discovery in 1906, oxytocin was regarded as a "female hormone" because mothers' brains release it during childbirth, according to Kerstin Moberg, a Swedish scientist and an early pioneer in oxytocin science. But in the late 1980s, Moberg's research showed that both men and women get an oxytocin rush when they are in physical contact. Animal studies in the 1990s found that the brains of many other mammals release oxytocin during mating.

Of course, I knew the placebo effect could mangle that the results of my not-so-scientific experiment, so earlier that day I met with Marcel Kinsbourne, a neuropsychologist at The New School in New York City. In his office at Union Square, I told him about my plan to take oxytocin before a date that same night. He got very excited, but told me that a lot of factors can play a role in what happens. The third date is often when a pair has the best time together, and it's important not to draw any conclusion from that, he said in his calming German accent. He made me promise to report back the results.
Oxytocin products are being marketed on the internet as pills and sprays to increase trust and cure stress.

I also spoke with two women who definitely don't believe the oxytocin rush is all placebo effect. Susan Kuchinskas and Elisabeth Cruz organize oxytocin parties in Berkeley, California. Called "Love Chemistry," the parties are for people who are interested in the science of love, says Kuchinskas. At the parties, people take artificially produced oxytocin together as an icebreaker. Cruz and Kuchinskas have gotten many different reactions from the attendees. "Some people feel warm and then they feel really calm while others feel disconnected, and they don't know if they like it or not," says Cruz. "There have also been nights when people feel so comfortable they don't want to go home."

But many scientists remain dismissive of how oxytocin products are being marketed on the internet as pills and sprays to increase trust and cure stress. "Some of the indications and proposed usages of oxytocin might very well be true, but there is too little research to say so yet," says Moberg. Many of the properties attributed to the hormone rely on just one study, she explains.

There are many studies, however, that have examined the effects of oxytocin on animals. In one 2003 experiment, researchers petted pairs of rats that were caged together. When they were later released into a larger group, the two rats were much more likely to mate than rats that hadn't been stroked. The researchers saw the same results among pairs of rats that received injections of oxytocin instead of petting.

I was skeptical that my spray would have any effect at all. Morberg told me that when oxytocin is released into the bloodstream it comes in waves, sometimes over a long period of time. So taking a dose through the nose might produce an effect, but it will never be as strong as when the body releases the hormone naturally.

* * *

Just before I left for dinner, I took the little blue bottle out of my refrigerator and sprayed a blast of liquid into each nostril. At first I didn't feel anything; whatever was in OxytocinFactor was completely tasteless and odorless. But after a minute, I got a thickening feeling around my nose, as though I had suddenly developed a cold. I could also feel some of the chilled liquid running down the back of my throat. The stuffy-nose feeling subsided after a few minutes, so I ran out the door and hopped on the subway.
I took the little blue bottle out of my refrigerator and sprayed a blast of liquid into each nostril.
On the train I felt a little dizzy; I imagined the liquid ascending into my brain and expanding like a cloud. But I started to feel my otherwise tense shoulders relaxing. By the time I arrived at the restaurant, 20 minutes had passed since I'd inhaled the oxytocin.

I decided not to tell my date I had taken the hormone. Kinsbourne had explained that if just one person acts more comfortable and interested, it can spark a natural release of oxytocin in the other person. My companion was tall with dark hair, and I thought I had never seen him so nicely dressed before. He wore dark jeans, a black jacket and a hat (in retrospect, I hate chunky hip-hop caps, but at the time I found everything about him very charming.) We took a tiny table in the middle of the room. It was a brightly lit, busy place, and the waitresses were screaming loud orders in Shanghainese. It wasn't romantic, but I didn't care-I was in a very good mood.

And my date definitely seemed more confident and relaxed. I sensed that he liked this calmer version of me better than the very intense and chatty version he had met before. We took a long walk home, and, for the first and only time, I imagined us as a couple.

We were going uptown on the same train, and before he headed out, he asked me if he could come with me back to my place. Sitting there close to him, I wanted to say yes, and it felt strange to leave him after such an intimate evening. But something made me hesitate, the train stopped, and I said no. He bent forward and kissed me on the cheek, looking miserable as he left the train. Oxytocin might have increased my trust and made me more patient, but it hadn't made me lose my guard.

After our very affectionate date, I was excited to meet him again a few days later. I didn't take oxytocin this time. He came to my place for pancakes, and I was a little nervous. As he sat there in my kitchen, we suddenly had nothing to talk about. It was back to stiff conversation. I didn't find him very attractive and got annoyed that I had to come up with things to talk about.

I think he could feel it, and after we said goodbye, he sent me a text thanking me for the pancakes. I never heard from him again. Maybe I was under the spell of oxytocin that earlier night, or perhaps it was, as Kinsbourne said, "the magic of the third date."

Viola Gad is a freelance writer based in New York City. Follow her on Twitter as @violagad.



http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-04/can-oxytocin-get-me-boyf

NEWS - How 4 Nerds Discovered The DNA Helix 60 Years Ago Today

Letter Francis Crick wrote to his son in 1953 Christie's via io9
From the Popular Science archive, the story of how Watson, Crick, Wilkins, and Franklin worked out the structure of life.

"DNA: It Calls the Signals of Life," by Wallace Cloud and excerpted below, originally appeared in the May 1963 issue of Popular Science magazine. Francis Crick and James Watson first described the double helix structure of DNA on April 25, 1953.--Ed

Last December an American biologist and two English physicists received formal recognition, in the shape of a Nobel Prize, for a discovery made 10 years ago-a discovery that started a chain reaction in biology.

They determined the structure of a molecule that provides answers to questions scientists have been asking for over a century:

• How does a heart muscle "know" how to beat?
• How does a brain cell "know" how to play its role in thinking and feeling?
• How do the cells of the body "know" how to grow, to reproduce, to heal wounds, to fight off disease?
• How do infectious bacteria "know" what diseases to cause?
• How do single fertilized egg cells, from which most of nature's creatures begin, "know" how to become plants, animals, people?
• If one such cell is to multiply and form a human being, how does it "know" how to produce a potential Einstein or a Marilyn Monroe?

The stuff that genes are made of

Sounds like a lot to expect of a molecule-even one with a jaw-breaking name like deoxyribonucleic acid (known more familiarly as DNA). But it's scientific fact that DNA is what genes are made of. DNA molecules supply the basic instructions that direct the life processes of all living things (except a few viruses). The DNA molecule contains information in a chemical code-the code of life.

The effects of discovery of the structure of DNA have been called "a revolution far greater in its potential significance than the atomic or hydrogen bomb." Professor Arne Tiselius, President of the Nobel Foundation, has said that it "will lead to methods of tampering with life, of creating new diseases, of controlling minds, of influencing heredity-even, perhaps, in certain desired directions."

I asked the American member of the Nobel Prize trio, Dr. James D. Watson, about these speculations in his laboratory at Harvard. It was a few weeks before he flew to Stockholm to receive the award along with Dr. Francis H. C. Crick of Cambridge University and Dr. Maurice H. F. Wilkins of King's College, London.
The discovery of the structure of DNA was as important as the working out of atomic structure that led to the atom bomb.

The boyish 34-year-old Nobelman, who did the prize-winning research in England when he was only 25 (he entered college at 15, had been a Quiz Kid before that, in the days of radio), refused to endorse the wilder predictions about the future of DNA research. He said, "The average scientist busy with research looks ahead anywhere from an hour to two years, not more."

Conceding that discovery of the structure of DNA was as important as the working out of atomic structure that led to the atom bomb, he added, "It will have a very profound effect, slowly, on medicine. Doctors will stop doing silly things. Our knowledge of DNA won't cure disease, but it gives you a new approach-tells you how to look at a disease."

Dr. Watson went on to explain just what he and his co-workers discovered during those days of inspired brainwork in England, back in 1953, and how they did it.

The discovery was not the work of an institute-full of technicians, he said, but the product of four minds: He and Crick did the theoretical work, interpreting cryptic X-ray diffraction photos made by Wilkins, who had as collaborator an English woman scientist, Dr. Rosalind Franklin. She died in 1958. She "should have shared" the Nobel Prize, said Dr. Watson.

Picking up the thread

DNA was not a newly discovered substance. It had been isolated in 1869, and by 1944 geneticists were sure it was the substance of the genes-the sites of hereditary information in the chromosomes. Then they started asking, "How does it work?" That's the question Watson and his co-Nobelists answered.
They knew DNA as one of the most complex of the "giant molecules" known to man.

They knew DNA as one of the most complex of the "giant molecules" known to man. It was believed to have a long, chainlike structure consisting of repeating groups of atoms, with side groups sticking out at regular intervals.

The shape of the DNA molecule was important. In the cell, many of the larger molecules work together like machine parts, and their mechanical properties are as important as their chemical activity. However, even the electron microscope, through which it is possible to see some of the biggest giant molecules, shows DNA only as a thread, without detail. One way of "looking" at molecules is to take them apart by chemical treatments that make small molecules out of big ones. In the case of DNA, the pieces-six kinds of sub-molecular units-had been identified. Now it was necessary to figure out how the jigsaw puzzle fitted together.

Read the rest of the story in the May 1963 issue of Popular Science.



http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-04/how-four-nerds-discovere