HEALTH PORTATION curated News May 22nd

BRAIN - Clouds in the head
Many brain researchers cannot see the forest for the trees. When they use electrodes to record the activity patterns of individual neurons, the patterns often appear chaotic and difficult to interpret ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-clouds.htm

BRAIN - Common food supplement fights degenerative brain disorders
Widely available in pharmacies and health stores, phosphatidylserine is a natural food supplement produced from beef, oysters, and soy. Proven to improve cognition and slow memory loss, it's a popular treatment for older people experiencing memory impairment. Now a team headed by Prof. Gil Ast and Dr. Ron Bochner of Tel Aviv University's Department of Human Molecular Genetics have discovered that the same supplement improves the functioning of ge ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-common-food-supplement

BRAIN - Costs to treat stroke in America may double by 2030
Costs to treat stroke are projected to more than double and the number of people having strokes may increase 20 percent by 2030, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-america.htm

BRAIN - Free distribution of auditory orientation training system for the visually impaired
Researchers from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), and the Research Institute of Electrical Communication (RIEC) of Tohoku University have jointly developed an auditory orientation training system for the visually impaired. This technology artificially reproduces the clues to auditory orientation used by a visually impaired person during walking, such as the movement and reflection of sounds, by using th ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-free-auditory-visually

BRAIN - Having both migraines, depression may mean smaller brain
(HealthDay)-Migraines and depression can each cause a great deal of suffering, but new research indicates the combination of the two may be linked to something else entirely-a smaller brain ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-migraines-depression-s

BRAIN - If you can remember it, you can remember it wrong
(Medical Xpress)-Native peoples in regions where cameras are uncommon sometimes react with caution when their picture is taken. The fear that something must have been stolen from them to create the photo is often inescapable. On small scales, we know it is in fact impossible to measure something without changing its essential character in some way. One idea that has recently gained momentum, is that although our brains have mechanisms for unpacki ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-wrong.htm

DIABETES - Fish oil supplements may help fight against Type 2 diabetes
Widely-used fish oil supplements modestly increase amounts of a hormone that is associated with lower risk of diabetes and heart disease, according to a study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-fish-oil-supplements-d

DIABETES - Insight into the dazzling impact of insulin in cells
Australian scientists have charted the path of insulin action in cells in precise detail like never before. This provides a comprehensive blueprint for understanding what goes wrong in diabetes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-insight-dazzling-impac

DIGESTION - H. pylori, smoking trends, and gastric cancer in US men
Trends in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and smoking explain a significant proportion of the decline of intestinal-type noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma (NCGA) incidence in US men between 1978 and 2008, and are estimated to continue to contribute to further declines between 2008 and 2040 ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-pylori-trends-gastric-

DIGESTION - Succesful results in developing oral vaccine against diarrhea
The University of Gothenburg Vaccine Research Institute (GUVAX) announces successful results in a placebo controlled phase I study of an oral, inactivated Escherichia coli diarrhea vaccine ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-succesful-results-oral

FOODS - Calorie information in fast food restaurants used by 40 percent of 9-18 year olds when making food choices
A new study published online today (Thursday) in the Journal of Public Health has found that of young people who visited fast food or chain restaurants in the U.S. in 2010, girls and youth who were obese were more likely to use calorie information given in the restaurants to inform their food choices. It also found that young people eating at fast food or chain restaurants twice a week or more were half as likely to use calorie information as tho ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-calorie-fast-food-rest

FOODS - Nearly half the rice sold in Guangzhou (pop. 12+ million) is contaminated by cadmium
The latest scandal out of China has to do with Guangzhou, a huge metropolis in the South of the country ...
http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-agriculture/nearly-hal

FOODS - Salt consumption in India: The need for data to initiate population-based prevention efforts
(Medical Xpress)-International researchers are studying the salt intake of Indian adults to provide vital new data to aid the development of a national salt reduction strategy ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-salt-consumption-india

HEART - Biomarker trio predicts near-term heart risk
(Medical Xpress)-Cardiologists have identified a trio of biomarkers that may predict which patients with heart disease have a high risk of heart attack or death in the next two years ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-biomarker-trio-near-te

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Research shows how immune system peacefully co-exists with 'good' bacteria
The human gut is loaded with commensal bacteria - "good" microbes that, among other functions, help the body digest food. The gastrointestinal tract contains literally trillions of such cells, and yet the immune system seemingly turns a blind eye. However, in several chronic human diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), HIV/AIDS, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, the immune system attacks these normally beneficial bacteria, ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-immune-peacefully-co-e

LONGEVITY - Slowing the aging process-only with antibiotics
Swiss scientists reveal the mechanism responsible for aging hidden deep within mitochondria-and dramatically slow it down in worms by administering antibiotics to the young ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-aging-processonly-anti

NEWS - AIDS scientists optimistic of AIDS cure, for some
Top AIDS scientists were optimistic Wednesday of finding a cure for the disease that has claimed 30 million lives-but said it might not work for all people ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-aids-scientists-optimi

NEWS - Alleviating hunger in the US, it's a SNAP, researcher says
A University of Illinois researcher says that the cornerstone of our efforts to alleviate food insecurity should be to encourage more people to participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) "because it works. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-alleviating-hunger-sna

NEWS - Analgesics prescribed more heavily to women than to men, study finds
Regardless of pain, social class or age, a woman is more likely to be prescribed pain-relieving drugs. A study published in Gaceta Sanitaria (Spanish health scientific journal) affirms that this phenomenon is influenced by socioeconomic inequality between genders in the Autonomous Community in which the patient resides ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-analgesics-heavily-wom

NEWS - Dirty jokes the best medicine
When it comes to men's sexual health, dirty jokes may just be the best medicine. A QUT researcher is helping Family Planning Queensland (FPQ) use comedy and YouTube to deliver sexuality education to young Australian men ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-dirty-medicine.htm

NEWS - Eyes on the sun: Child sunshine exposure and eye development
(Medical Xpress)-Exposure to sunshine as a small child is crucial to the development of a healthy eye according to results of long-term myopia study conducted by University of Sydney researchers ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-eyes-sun-child-sunshin

NEWS - Glaucoma drug can cause droopy eyelids
Prostaglandin analogues (PGAs), drugs which lower intraocular pressure, are often the first line of treatment for people with glaucoma, but their use is not without risks. PGAs have long been associated with blurred vision, dryness, changes in eye color and other side effects. Now a new study has found that these drugs also cause upper and lower eyelid drooping and other issues that can interfere with vision. The findings are described in PLOS ON ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-glaucoma-drug-droopy-e

NEWS - Hospitals profit when patients develop bloodstream infections
Johns Hopkins researchers report that hospitals may be reaping enormous income for patients whose hospital stays are complicated by preventable bloodstream infections contracted in their intensive care units ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-hospitals-profit-patie

NEWS - How healthy are you for your age?
On May 22, JoVE will publish details of a technique to measure the health of human genetic material in relation to a patient's age. The method is demonstrated by the laboratory of Dr. Gil Atzmon at New York's Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Atzmon hopes that the dissemination of this technique will lead to the development of a "genetic thermometer" to assess a patient's health in relation to other individuals of the same age ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-healthy-age.htm

NEWS - Italy approves law on controversial stem cell therapy
Italian lawmakers on Wednesday gave their final approval to a law that allows limited use of a controversial type of stem cell therapy which has been condemned by many scientists but has given hope to families of terminally-ill children ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-italy-law-controversia

NEWS - Life-saving face transplant performed in Poland
(AP)-Doctors in Poland say they have performed an urgent total face transplant on a 33-year-old man whose face was torn off in an accident which also crushed his jaws ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-life-saving-transplant

NEWS - Medical researchers discover new ways to target, develop and design drugs to prevent and treat viral infection
Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a new drug target, developed a new drug and identified a new way to design drugs-all of which could be a winning combination in the battle against viruses ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-medical-ways-drugs-vir

NEWS - Mysterious illness kills two in southeast Alabama
(AP)-Alabama health officials say a mysterious respiratory illness has left five people hospitalized and two dead in the southeastern part of the state ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-mysterious-illness-sou

NEWS - New blood-thinner measures may cut medication errors
Blood thinners are the preferred treatment option to prevent heart attacks, blood clots and stroke, but they are not without risk, and not just because of their side effects. These high-risk drugs, known as anticoagulants, account for nearly 7 percent of medication errors in hospitalized patients ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-blood-thinner-medicati

NEWS - New search engine finds rare diagnoses
Doctors are trained to think "common disease" when they meet patients in their practices, and as they rarely or never meet a rare disease, it often takes many years to reach the right diagnosis. A new search tool called FindZebra developed at the Technical University of Denmark can dramatically reduce this time in many cases ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-rare.htm

NEWS - Survey points out deficiencies in addictions training for medical residents
A 2012 survey of internal medicine residents at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) - one of the nation's leading teaching hospitals - found that more than half rated the training they had received in addiction and other substance use disorders as fair or poor. Significant numbers felt unprepared to diagnose or treat such disorders, results similar to surveys of practicing physicians. In response to the findings, recently published online in the ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-survey-deficiencies-ad

NEWS-CANCER - American cancer society celebrates 100 years of progress
(HealthDay)-The American Cancer Society, which is celebrating on Wednesday a century of fighting a disease once viewed as a death sentence, is making a pledge to put itself out of business ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-american-cancer-societ

NEWS-CANCER - Cancer survivors need more support to stop smoking and drinking
Cancer survivors are no more likely to stop smoking, cut down on alcohol, or exercise more often than the general population, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer today (Wednesday ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-cancer-survivors.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Changing cancer's environment to halt its spread
By studying the roles two proteins, thrombospondin-1 and prosaposin, play in discouraging cancer metastasis, a trans-Atlantic research team has identified a five-amino acid fragment of prosaposin that significantly reduces metastatic spread in mouse models of prostate, breast and lung cancer. The findings suggest that a prosaposin-based drug could potentially block metastasis in a variety of cancers ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-cancer-environment-hal

NEWS-CANCER - Research offers promising new approach to treatment of lung cancer
Researchers have developed a new drug delivery system that allows inhalation of chemotherapeutic drugs to help treat lung cancer, and in laboratory and animal tests it appears to reduce the systemic damage done to other organs while significantly improving the treatment of lung tumors ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-approach-treatment-lun

PAIN - Sugar injections for knee arthritis may ease pain
(HealthDay)-Injections of a sugar solution appear to help relieve knee pain and stiffness related to osteoarthritis, a new study suggests ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-sugar-knee-arthritis-e

PSYCHOLOGY - Addiction as a disorder of decision-making
New research shows that craving drugs such as nicotine can be visualized in specific regions of the brain that are implicated in determining the value of actions, in planning actions and in motivation. Dr. Alain Dagher, from McGill University, suggests abnormal interactions between these decision-making brain regions could underlie addiction. These results were presented at the 2013 Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, the annual meeting of the Canadia ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-addiction-disorder-dec

SKIN - Acne treatment: Natural substance-based formula is more effective than artificial compounds
University of Granada scientists have patented a new treatment for acne that is based on completely natural substances and is much more effective than artificial formulas because it does not create resistance to bacteria and has no secondary effects ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-acne-treatment-natural

SLEEP - Experts favor US approval of Merck sleeping pill (Update)
An independent panel of experts on Wednesday recommended US approval of a new Merck sleeping pill called suvorexant, but expressed concerns over the highest dosage and risks of drowsy daytime driving ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-fda-panel-experimental

SLEEP - New theory offers clues to vital 'repair and maintenance' role of sleep
(Medical Xpress)-We spend about a third of our life asleep, but why we need to do so remains a mystery. In a recent publication, researchers at University of Surrey and University College London suggest a new hypothesis, that the biological function of sleep is to allow for vital 'repair and maintenance' of the cells in our brain, so called neurons. The research also proposes that these repair functions can only occur if the rest periods of indi ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-theory-clues-vital-mai

SLEEP - Obstructive sleep apnea associated with less visceral fat accumulation in women than men
A new study from researchers in Japan indicates that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with visceral (abdominal) fat accumulation only in men, perhaps explaining gender differences in the impact of OSA on cardiovascular disease and mortality ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-obstructive-apnea-visc

SLEEP - Parent and teacher support protects teens from sleep problems and depression
A new study suggests that disturbed sleep in adolescents is associated with more symptoms of depression and greater uncertainly about future success. However, perceived support and acceptance from parents and teachers appears to have a protective effect ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-parent-teacher-teens-p

VITAMINS - B vitamins could delay dementia
(Medical Xpress)-Despite spending billions of dollars on research and development, drug companies have been unable to come up with effective treatments for dementia and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Now, A. David Smith at the University of Oxford and his colleagues have discovered that, in some patients experiencing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a cocktail of high-dose B vitamins could prevent gray matter loss associated with progression to AD. T ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-vitamins-dementia.htm

VITAMINS - Calcium supplements linked to longer lifespans in women
Taking a calcium supplement of up to 1,000 mg per day can help women live longer, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-calcium-supplements-li

VITAMINS - Study finds vitamin C can kill drug-resistant TB (w/ video)
In a striking, unexpected discovery, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have determined that vitamin C kills drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) bacteria in laboratory culture. The finding suggests that vitamin C added to existing TB drugs could shorten TB therapy, and it highlights a new area for drug design. The study was published today in the online journal Nature Communications ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-vitamin-drug-resistant

WATER - What America Will Look Like Under 25 Feet Of Sea Water
If climate models are correct, then Hurricane Sandy, and the flooding it brought, gave us a gentle preview of the not-so-distant future. A recent NASA study found that between 1992 and 2012, global sea levels rose, on average, a little more than one inch per year. That's much faster than climatologists had expected. See what could vanish when sea level rises > The trend is not reversing. Sea levels rise because of melting glaciers and ice shee ...
Jefferson 25 feet
http://www.businessinsider.com/us-city-sea-level-rise-maps-n

WATERS - Portland, Ore., rejecting water fluoridation
(AP)-The mayor of Portland, Ore., has conceded defeat in an effort to add fluoride to the city's drinking water ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-portland-ore-fluoridat

WEIGHT - Addiction to unhealthy foods could help explain the global obesity epidemic
Research presented today shows that high-fructose corn syrup can cause behavioural reactions in rats similar to those produced by drugs of abuse such as cocaine. These results, presented by addiction expert Francesco Leri, Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Science at the University of Guelph, suggest food addiction could explain, at least partly, the current global obesity epidemic. These results were presented at the 2013 ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-addiction-unhealthy-fo

BRAIN - Clouds in the head

Many brain researchers cannot see the forest for the trees. When they use electrodes to record the activity patterns of individual neurons, the patterns often appear chaotic and difficult to interpret.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-clouds.htm

BRAIN - Common food supplement fights degenerative brain disorders

Widely available in pharmacies and health stores, phosphatidylserine is a natural food supplement produced from beef, oysters, and soy. Proven to improve cognition and slow memory loss, it's a popular treatment for older people experiencing memory impairment. Now a team headed by Prof. Gil Ast and Dr. Ron Bochner of Tel Aviv University's Department of Human Molecular Genetics have discovered that the same supplement improves the functioning of genes involved in degenerative brain disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Familial Dysautonomia (FD).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-common-food-supplement-degenerat

BRAIN - Costs to treat stroke in America may double by 2030

Costs to treat stroke are projected to more than double and the number of people having strokes may increase 20 percent by 2030, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-america.htm

BRAIN - Free distribution of auditory orientation training system for the visually impaired

Researchers from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), and the Research Institute of Electrical Communication (RIEC) of Tohoku University have jointly developed an auditory orientation training system for the visually impaired. This technology artificially reproduces the clues to auditory orientation used by a visually impaired person during walking, such as the movement and reflection of sounds, by using three-dimensional acoustic technology. Through downsizing and cost reduction, the researchers have developed it into a practical training system that allows a visually impaired person who has just started orientation and mobility (O&M) training to receive auditory orientation training safely and effectively. Starting on April 11, 2013, the software for the training system is available for free to people and organizations concerned with the visually impaired.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-free-auditory-visually-impaired.

BRAIN - Having both migraines, depression may mean smaller brain

(HealthDay)-Migraines and depression can each cause a great deal of suffering, but new research indicates the combination of the two may be linked to something else entirely-a smaller brain.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-migraines-depression-smaller-bra

BRAIN - If you can remember it, you can remember it wrong

(Medical Xpress)-Native peoples in regions where cameras are uncommon sometimes react with caution when their picture is taken. The fear that something must have been stolen from them to create the photo is often inescapable. On small scales, we know it is in fact impossible to measure something without changing its essential character in some way. One idea that has recently gained momentum, is that although our brains have mechanisms for unpacking past experience into a form where it can be consciously manipulated with the full power of the mind, mechanisms to repack those memories into the original form lack similar finesse. In this light, once touched, a memory is no longer exactly the same. A paper just published in PNAS takes a closer look at how memories are reconsolidated after their retrieval. In showing just how easy it is to change certain kinds of memories, the authors not only raise new concerns for eyewitness testimony in the courtroom, but may explain in part why such testimony often tends to accumulate doubt in the face of continued questioning. The implication is that this new knowledge may be useful in the treatment post traumatic stress in veterans and victims.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-wrong.htm

DIABETES - Fish oil supplements may help fight against Type 2 diabetes

Widely-used fish oil supplements modestly increase amounts of a hormone that is associated with lower risk of diabetes and heart disease, according to a study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-fish-oil-supplements-diabetes.ht

DIABETES - Insight into the dazzling impact of insulin in cells

Australian scientists have charted the path of insulin action in cells in precise detail like never before. This provides a comprehensive blueprint for understanding what goes wrong in diabetes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-insight-dazzling-impact-insulin-

DIGESTION - H. pylori, smoking trends, and gastric cancer in US men

Trends in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and smoking explain a significant proportion of the decline of intestinal-type noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma (NCGA) incidence in US men between 1978 and 2008, and are estimated to continue to contribute to further declines between 2008 and 2040.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-pylori-trends-gastric-cancer-men

DIGESTION - Succesful results in developing oral vaccine against diarrhea

The University of Gothenburg Vaccine Research Institute (GUVAX) announces successful results in a placebo controlled phase I study of an oral, inactivated Escherichia coli diarrhea vaccine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-succesful-results-oral-vaccine-d

FOODS - Calorie information in fast food restaurants used by 40 percent of 9-18 year olds when making food choices

A new study published online today (Thursday) in the Journal of Public Health has found that of young people who visited fast food or chain restaurants in the U.S. in 2010, girls and youth who were obese were more likely to use calorie information given in the restaurants to inform their food choices. It also found that young people eating at fast food or chain restaurants twice a week or more were half as likely to use calorie information as those eating there once a week or less.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-calorie-fast-food-restaurants-pe

FOODS - Nearly half the rice sold in Guangzhou (pop. 12+ million) is contaminated by cadmium

The latest scandal out of China has to do with Guangzhou, a huge metropolis in the South of the country.

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-agriculture/nearly-half-rice-sol

FOODS - Salt consumption in India: The need for data to initiate population-based prevention efforts

(Medical Xpress)-International researchers are studying the salt intake of Indian adults to provide vital new data to aid the development of a national salt reduction strategy.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-salt-consumption-india-populatio

HEART - Biomarker trio predicts near-term heart risk

(Medical Xpress)-Cardiologists have identified a trio of biomarkers that may predict which patients with heart disease have a high risk of heart attack or death in the next two years.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-biomarker-trio-near-term-heart.h

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Research shows how immune system peacefully co-exists with 'good' bacteria

The human gut is loaded with commensal bacteria - "good" microbes that, among other functions, help the body digest food. The gastrointestinal tract contains literally trillions of such cells, and yet the immune system seemingly turns a blind eye. However, in several chronic human diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), HIV/AIDS, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, the immune system attacks these normally beneficial bacteria, resulting in chronic inflammation and contributing to disease progression.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-immune-peacefully-co-exists-good

LONGEVITY - Slowing the aging process-only with antibiotics

Swiss scientists reveal the mechanism responsible for aging hidden deep within mitochondria-and dramatically slow it down in worms by administering antibiotics to the young.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-aging-processonly-antibiotics.ht

NEWS - AIDS scientists optimistic of AIDS cure, for some

Top AIDS scientists were optimistic Wednesday of finding a cure for the disease that has claimed 30 million lives-but said it might not work for all people.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-aids-scientists-optimistic.htm

NEWS - Alleviating hunger in the US, it's a SNAP, researcher says

A University of Illinois researcher says that the cornerstone of our efforts to alleviate food insecurity should be to encourage more people to participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) "because it works."

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-alleviating-hunger-snap.htm

NEWS - Analgesics prescribed more heavily to women than to men, study finds

Regardless of pain, social class or age, a woman is more likely to be prescribed pain-relieving drugs. A study published in Gaceta Sanitaria (Spanish health scientific journal) affirms that this phenomenon is influenced by socioeconomic inequality between genders in the Autonomous Community in which the patient resides.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-analgesics-heavily-women-men.htm

NEWS - Dirty jokes the best medicine

When it comes to men's sexual health, dirty jokes may just be the best medicine. A QUT researcher is helping Family Planning Queensland (FPQ) use comedy and YouTube to deliver sexuality education to young Australian men.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-dirty-medicine.htm

NEWS - Eyes on the sun: Child sunshine exposure and eye development

(Medical Xpress)-Exposure to sunshine as a small child is crucial to the development of a healthy eye according to results of long-term myopia study conducted by University of Sydney researchers.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-eyes-sun-child-sunshine-exposure

NEWS - Glaucoma drug can cause droopy eyelids

Prostaglandin analogues (PGAs), drugs which lower intraocular pressure, are often the first line of treatment for people with glaucoma, but their use is not without risks. PGAs have long been associated with blurred vision, dryness, changes in eye color and other side effects. Now a new study has found that these drugs also cause upper and lower eyelid drooping and other issues that can interfere with vision. The findings are described in PLOS ONE.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-glaucoma-drug-droopy-eyelids.htm

NEWS - Hospitals profit when patients develop bloodstream infections

Johns Hopkins researchers report that hospitals may be reaping enormous income for patients whose hospital stays are complicated by preventable bloodstream infections contracted in their intensive care units.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-hospitals-profit-patients-bloods

NEWS - How healthy are you for your age?

On May 22, JoVE will publish details of a technique to measure the health of human genetic material in relation to a patient's age. The method is demonstrated by the laboratory of Dr. Gil Atzmon at New York's Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Atzmon hopes that the dissemination of this technique will lead to the development of a "genetic thermometer" to assess a patient's health in relation to other individuals of the same age.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-healthy-age.htm

NEWS - Italy approves law on controversial stem cell therapy

Italian lawmakers on Wednesday gave their final approval to a law that allows limited use of a controversial type of stem cell therapy which has been condemned by many scientists but has given hope to families of terminally-ill children.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-italy-law-controversial-stem-cel

NEWS - Life-saving face transplant performed in Poland

(AP)-Doctors in Poland say they have performed an urgent total face transplant on a 33-year-old man whose face was torn off in an accident which also crushed his jaws.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-life-saving-transplant-poland.ht

NEWS - Medical researchers discover new ways to target, develop and design drugs to prevent and treat viral infection

Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a new drug target, developed a new drug and identified a new way to design drugs-all of which could be a winning combination in the battle against viruses.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-medical-ways-drugs-viral-infecti

NEWS - Mysterious illness kills two in southeast Alabama

(AP)-Alabama health officials say a mysterious respiratory illness has left five people hospitalized and two dead in the southeastern part of the state.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-mysterious-illness-southeast-ala

NEWS - New blood-thinner measures may cut medication errors

Blood thinners are the preferred treatment option to prevent heart attacks, blood clots and stroke, but they are not without risk, and not just because of their side effects. These high-risk drugs, known as anticoagulants, account for nearly 7 percent of medication errors in hospitalized patients.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-blood-thinner-medication-errors.

NEWS - New search engine finds rare diagnoses

Doctors are trained to think "common disease" when they meet patients in their practices, and as they rarely or never meet a rare disease, it often takes many years to reach the right diagnosis. A new search tool called FindZebra developed at the Technical University of Denmark can dramatically reduce this time in many cases.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-rare.htm

NEWS - Survey points out deficiencies in addictions training for medical residents

A 2012 survey of internal medicine residents at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) - one of the nation's leading teaching hospitals - found that more than half rated the training they had received in addiction and other substance use disorders as fair or poor. Significant numbers felt unprepared to diagnose or treat such disorders, results similar to surveys of practicing physicians. In response to the findings, recently published online in the journal Substance Abuse, the MGH has increased residents' training in addiction medicine.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-survey-deficiencies-addictions-m

NEWS-CANCER - American cancer society celebrates 100 years of progress

(HealthDay)-The American Cancer Society, which is celebrating on Wednesday a century of fighting a disease once viewed as a death sentence, is making a pledge to put itself out of business.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-american-cancer-society-celebrat

NEWS-CANCER - Cancer survivors need more support to stop smoking and drinking

Cancer survivors are no more likely to stop smoking, cut down on alcohol, or exercise more often than the general population, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer today (Wednesday)

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-cancer-survivors.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Changing cancer's environment to halt its spread

By studying the roles two proteins, thrombospondin-1 and prosaposin, play in discouraging cancer metastasis, a trans-Atlantic research team has identified a five-amino acid fragment of prosaposin that significantly reduces metastatic spread in mouse models of prostate, breast and lung cancer. The findings suggest that a prosaposin-based drug could potentially block metastasis in a variety of cancers.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-cancer-environment-halt.htm

NEWS-CANCER - Research offers promising new approach to treatment of lung cancer

Researchers have developed a new drug delivery system that allows inhalation of chemotherapeutic drugs to help treat lung cancer, and in laboratory and animal tests it appears to reduce the systemic damage done to other organs while significantly improving the treatment of lung tumors.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-approach-treatment-lung-cancer.h

PAIN - Sugar injections for knee arthritis may ease pain

(HealthDay)-Injections of a sugar solution appear to help relieve knee pain and stiffness related to osteoarthritis, a new study suggests.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-sugar-knee-arthritis-ease-pain.h

PSYCHOLOGY - Addiction as a disorder of decision-making

New research shows that craving drugs such as nicotine can be visualized in specific regions of the brain that are implicated in determining the value of actions, in planning actions and in motivation. Dr. Alain Dagher, from McGill University, suggests abnormal interactions between these decision-making brain regions could underlie addiction. These results were presented at the 2013 Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, the annual meeting of the Canadian Association for Neuroscience - Association Canadienne des Neurosciences (CAN-ACN).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-addiction-disorder-decision-maki

SKIN - Acne treatment: Natural substance-based formula is more effective than artificial compounds

University of Granada scientists have patented a new treatment for acne that is based on completely natural substances and is much more effective than artificial formulas because it does not create resistance to bacteria and has no secondary effects.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-acne-treatment-natural-substance

SLEEP - Experts favor US approval of Merck sleeping pill (Update)

An independent panel of experts on Wednesday recommended US approval of a new Merck sleeping pill called suvorexant, but expressed concerns over the highest dosage and risks of drowsy daytime driving.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-fda-panel-experimental-merck-ins

SLEEP - New theory offers clues to vital 'repair and maintenance' role of sleep

(Medical Xpress)-We spend about a third of our life asleep, but why we need to do so remains a mystery. In a recent publication, researchers at University of Surrey and University College London suggest a new hypothesis, that the biological function of sleep is to allow for vital 'repair and maintenance' of the cells in our brain, so called neurons. The research also proposes that these repair functions can only occur if the rest periods of individual neurons are aligned precisely at a time scale of seconds or less. The hypothesis is published today (20 May) in Nature Reviews Neuroscience.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-theory-clues-vital-maintenance-r

SLEEP - Obstructive sleep apnea associated with less visceral fat accumulation in women than men

A new study from researchers in Japan indicates that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with visceral (abdominal) fat accumulation only in men, perhaps explaining gender differences in the impact of OSA on cardiovascular disease and mortality.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-obstructive-apnea-visceral-fat-a

SLEEP - Parent and teacher support protects teens from sleep problems and depression

A new study suggests that disturbed sleep in adolescents is associated with more symptoms of depression and greater uncertainly about future success. However, perceived support and acceptance from parents and teachers appears to have a protective effect.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-parent-teacher-teens-problems-de

VITAMINS - B vitamins could delay dementia

(Medical Xpress)-Despite spending billions of dollars on research and development, drug companies have been unable to come up with effective treatments for dementia and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Now, A. David Smith at the University of Oxford and his colleagues have discovered that, in some patients experiencing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a cocktail of high-dose B vitamins could prevent gray matter loss associated with progression to AD. The study appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-vitamins-dementia.htm

VITAMINS - Calcium supplements linked to longer lifespans in women

Taking a calcium supplement of up to 1,000 mg per day can help women live longer, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-calcium-supplements-linked-longe

VITAMINS - Study finds vitamin C can kill drug-resistant TB (w/ video)

In a striking, unexpected discovery, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have determined that vitamin C kills drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) bacteria in laboratory culture. The finding suggests that vitamin C added to existing TB drugs could shorten TB therapy, and it highlights a new area for drug design. The study was published today in the online journal Nature Communications.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-vitamin-drug-resistant-tb-video.

WATERS - Portland, Ore., rejecting water fluoridation

(AP)-The mayor of Portland, Ore., has conceded defeat in an effort to add fluoride to the city's drinking water.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-portland-ore-fluoridation.htm

WEIGHT - Addiction to unhealthy foods could help explain the global obesity epidemic

Research presented today shows that high-fructose corn syrup can cause behavioural reactions in rats similar to those produced by drugs of abuse such as cocaine. These results, presented by addiction expert Francesco Leri, Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Applied Cognitive Science at the University of Guelph, suggest food addiction could explain, at least partly, the current global obesity epidemic. These results were presented at the 2013 Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, the annual meeting of the Canadian Association for Neuroscience - Association Canadienne des Neurosciences (CAN-ACN).

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-addiction-unhealthy-foods-global

BRAIN - Individuals who drink heavily and smoke may show 'early aging' of the brain

Treatment for alcohol use disorders works best if the patient actively understands and incorporates the interventions provided in the clinic. Multiple factors can influence both the type and degree of neurocognitive abnormalities found during early abstinence, including chronic cigarette smoking and increasing age. A new study is the first to look at the interactive effects of smoking status and age on neurocognition in treatment-seeking alcohol dependent (AD) individuals. Findings show that AD individuals who currently smoke show more problems with memory, ability to think quickly and efficiently, and problem-solving skills than those who don't smoke, effects which seem to become exacerbated with age.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-individuals-heavily-early-aging-

BRAIN - Physicist's tool has potential for brain mapping

Physicists are developing a new tool that uses low-energy near-infrared light and fiber optics for optogenetic stimulation of cells. He believes it will be a useful tool for mapping physical and functional connections in the brain.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516161708.ht

BRAIN - Temporal processing in the olfactory system

The neural machinery underlying our olfactory sense continues to be an enigma for neuroscience. A recent review in Neuron seeks to expand traditional ideas about how neurons in the olfactory bulb might encode information about odorants. One of the main authors, Terry Sejnowski, had the floor for a brief while at last week's national BRAIN Initiative meeting, where discussion of neural codes was a key issue. The Neuron review was published the day after the meeting, and it supports the previously established idea that the olfactory bulb is in many ways structurally comparable to the retina. The authors note however, that due to the apparent sparsity and lack of topographical organization in the olfactory front end, the particular blend of temporal coding used there should differ significantly from that used in the retina.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-temporal-olfactory.htm

BRAIN - When Will Humans Upload Their Brains to Computers?

Computers are getting smarter and faster; what's lagging is a way to scan and transfer our brain.

http://news.discovery.com/tech/when-will-humans-upload-their-brains-to

BRAIN - White matter imaging provides insight into human and chimpanzee aging

(Medical Xpress)-The instability of "white matter" in humans may contribute to greater cognitive decline during the aging of humans compared with chimpanzees, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have found.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-white-imaging-insight-human-chim

DIABETES - Immune protein could stop diabetes in its tracks

Melbourne researchers have identified an immune protein that has the potential to stop or reverse the development of type 1 diabetes in its early stages, before insulin-producing cells have been destroyed.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-immune-protein-diabetes-tracks.h

DIGESTION - New colonoscope provides ground-breaking view of colon

A ground-breaking advance in colonoscopy technology signals the future of colorectal care, according to research presented today at Digestive Disease Week(DDW). Additional research focuses on optimizing the minimal withdrawal time for colonoscopies and exploring safer methods for removing polyps.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-colonoscope-ground-breaking-view

FOODS - Consuming coffee linked to lower risk of detrimental liver disease, study finds

Regular consumption of coffee is associated with a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), an autoimmune liver disease, Mayo Clinic research shows. The findings were being presented at the Digestive Disease Week 2013 conference in Orlando, Fla.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-consuming-coffee-linked-detrimen

FOODS - Food scientists strive for sodium reduction

In the May issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), Associate Editor Karen Nachay writes about how food manufacturers are trying to overcome formulation challenges to develop better-tasting, low- and reduced-sodium products.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-food-scientists-sodium-reduction

HEART - Engineers monitor heart health using paper-thin flexible 'skin'

Engineers combine layers of flexible materials into pressure sensors to create a wearable heart monitor thinner than a dollar bill. The skin-like device could one day provide doctors with a safer way to check the condition of a patient's heart.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516105702.ht

HEART - Genetic screening could reveal hidden high risk for coronary heart disease

http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=131286&CultureCode=e

HEART - Instagram For Heart Attacks: iPhone App Speeds ECG Transmission To Hospital

In the crucial early stages of a possible heart attack, EMTs on the scene now rely on slow and unreliable proprietary technology to transmit vital ECG data to physicians at a hospital for evaluation. But a new iPhone app using standard cell phone networks may help speed the process and, ultimately, cut delays in treatment for heart attack patients.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryhusten/2013/05/17/instagram-for-heart

HEART - Security risks found in sensors for heart devices, consumer electronics

The type of sensors that pick up the rhythm of a beating heart in implanted cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers are vulnerable to tampering, according to a new study conducted in controlled laboratory conditions.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516123920.ht

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Women's reproductive ability may be related to immune system status

New research indicates that women's reproductive function may be tied to their immune status. Previous studies have found this association in human males, but not females.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-women-reproductive-ability-immun

HEALTH PORTATION curated News May 17th

BRAIN - Individuals who drink heavily and smoke may show 'early aging' of the brain
Treatment for alcohol use disorders works best if the patient actively understands and incorporates the interventions provided in the clinic. Multiple factors can influence both the type and degree of neurocognitive abnormalities found during early abstinence, including chronic cigarette smoking and increasing age. A new study is the first to look at the interactive effects of smoking status and age on neurocognition in treatment-seeking alcohol ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-individuals-heavily-ea

BRAIN - Physicist's tool has potential for brain mapping
Physicists are developing a new tool that uses low-energy near-infrared light and fiber optics for optogenetic stimulation of cells. He believes it will be a useful tool for mapping physical and functional connections in the brain ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516161708.ht

BRAIN - Temporal processing in the olfactory system
The neural machinery underlying our olfactory sense continues to be an enigma for neuroscience. A recent review in Neuron seeks to expand traditional ideas about how neurons in the olfactory bulb might encode information about odorants. One of the main authors, Terry Sejnowski, had the floor for a brief while at last week's national BRAIN Initiative meeting, where discussion of neural codes was a key issue. The Neuron review was published the da ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-temporal-olfactory.htm

BRAIN - When Will Humans Upload Their Brains to Computers?
Computers are getting smarter and faster; what's lagging is a way to scan and transfer our brain ...
http://news.discovery.com/tech/when-will-humans-upload-their

BRAIN - White matter imaging provides insight into human and chimpanzee aging
(Medical Xpress)-The instability of "white matter" in humans may contribute to greater cognitive decline during the aging of humans compared with chimpanzees, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have found ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-white-imaging-insight-

COOK - Roasted Brussels sprouts with orange butter sauce [Vegetarian]
The wonderful flavor of roasted Brussels sprouts is paired with the bright, sweet taste of orange in this quick and simple recipe ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/roasted-br

COOK - Spicy roasted cauliflower with lemon honey dressing [Vegan]
This recipe calls for a few spices, and a lemony dressing tossed over roasted cauliflower -- that's it, and suddenly something as bland as cauliflower will knock your taste buds off ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/spicy-roas

COOK - Sweet and creamy one-ingredient ice cream in 5 minutes [Vegan]
There is one single ingredient needed for this thick, decadent ice cream. But the variety of flavors it makes is limited only by your imagination ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/sweet-and-

COOK - Warm wheatberry salad with mushrooms and white wine [Vegan]
The savory flavors of mushrooms and onions simmered in white wine lace the nutritious wheatberries in this delicious salad ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/warm-wheat

COOK - Weekday Vegetarian: Wild Leek Biscuits with Cracked Coriander Seeds
Two years ago my daughter and I set a bit of a challenge for ourselves for the month of May. We decided that we would not purchase any baked goods for the entire month. That included bread, cookies, cakes and pies. My husband brought home a loaf o ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/savory-wil

DIGESTION - New colonoscope provides ground-breaking view of colon
A ground-breaking advance in colonoscopy technology signals the future of colorectal care, according to research presented today at Digestive Disease Week(DDW). Additional research focuses on optimizing the minimal withdrawal time for colonoscopies and exploring safer methods for removing polyps ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-colonoscope-ground-bre

FOODS - Consuming coffee linked to lower risk of detrimental liver disease, study finds
Regular consumption of coffee is associated with a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), an autoimmune liver disease, Mayo Clinic research shows. The findings were being presented at the Digestive Disease Week 2013 conference in Orlando, Fla ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-consuming-coffee-linke

FOODS - Food scientists strive for sodium reduction
In the May issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), Associate Editor Karen Nachay writes about how food manufacturers are trying to overcome formulation challenges to develop better-tasting, low- and reduced-sodium products ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-food-scientists-sodium

HEART - Engineers monitor heart health using paper-thin flexible 'skin'
Engineers combine layers of flexible materials into pressure sensors to create a wearable heart monitor thinner than a dollar bill. The skin-like device could one day provide doctors with a safer way to check the condition of a patient's heart ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516105702.ht

HEART - Instagram For Heart Attacks: iPhone App Speeds ECG Transmission To Hospital
In the crucial early stages of a possible heart attack, EMTs on the scene now rely on slow and unreliable proprietary technology to transmit vital ECG data to physicians at a hospital for evaluation. But a new iPhone app using standard cell phone networks may help speed the process and, ultimately, cut delays in treatment for heart attack patients ...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryhusten/2013/05/17/instagram

HEART - Security risks found in sensors for heart devices, consumer electronics
The type of sensors that pick up the rhythm of a beating heart in implanted cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers are vulnerable to tampering, according to a new study conducted in controlled laboratory conditions ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516123920.ht

IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Women's reproductive ability may be related to immune system status
New research indicates that women's reproductive function may be tied to their immune status. Previous studies have found this association in human males, but not females ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-women-reproductive-abi

LONGEVITY - The Most Significant Futurists of the Past 50 Years
Our visions of the future tend to be forged in the pages of science fiction. But for the past half-century, a number of prominent thinkers, activists, and scientists have made significant contributions to our understanding of what the future could look like. Here are 10 recent futurists you absolutely need to know about.Above image courtesy Dylan Cole. A few months ago we told you about 9 historical figures who may have predicted our future. Now ...
http://io9.com/the-most-significant-futurists-of-the-past-50

NEWS - AIDS science at 30: 'Cure' now part of lexicon
Big names in medicine are set to give an upbeat assessment of the war on AIDS on Tuesday, 30 years after French researchers identified the virus that causes the disease ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-aids-science-lexicon.h

NEWS - Can math models of gaming strategies be used to detect terrorism networks?
Mathematicians have developed a mathematical model to disrupt the flow of information in a complex real-world network, such as a terrorist organization, using minimal resources ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516142656.ht

NEWS - Flesh-eating disease victim gets prosthetic hands
(AP)-A woman who lost both hands, her left leg and right foot after contracting a flesh-eating disease has been fitted with prosthetic hands ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-flesh-eating-disease-v

NEWS - Learn the Periodic Table of Elements with this handy song
Whether you need to brush up on your chemistry, or just love it when someone sets the Periodic Table to music, AsapSCIENCE's The NEW Periodic Table Song is for you.This rundown of the elements in numerical order is set to Jacques Offenbach's Infernal Galop, but was otherwise written, produced, and performed by Mitchell Moffit. Here are the lyrics in case you missed anything:There's Hydrogen and Helium Then Lithium, Beryllium Boron, Carbon everyw ...
http://io9.com/learn-the-periodic-table-of-elements-with-thi

NEWS - New smartphone application improves colonoscopy preparation
The use of a smartphone application significantly improves patients' preparation for a colonoscopy, according to new research presented today at Digestive Disease Week (DDW). The preparation process, which begins days in advance of the procedure, includes dietary restrictions and requires specific bowel preparation medication to be taken at strict intervals. The better the preparation, the easier it is for doctors to see cancer and precancerous p ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-smartphone-application

NEWS - The terrifyingly specific phenomenon that makes your jaw glow green
Did you know that working around a certain chemical can make your jaw glow green and have to be chopped off? Not your teeth. Not your bones. Not your head. Your jaw. Learn what happens when biochemistry gets terrifyingly specific.Around the mid-1800s the first instances of "phossy jaw," cropped up. It wasn't called phossy jaw at first. It was just a terrible disease that seemed to afflict mostly those who worked in a factorie ...
http://io9.com/the-terrifyingly-specific-phenomenon-that-mak

NEWS-CANCER - Free testosterone drives cancer aggressiveness, study finds
What is the reason for the widely reported fact that men are more likely than women to die of cancer? New evidence from population studies suggests that free testosterone could be a key driver of cancer aggressiveness in a broad range of solid tumors and sarcomas, not just gender-specific cancers, according to researchers at the Danbury Hospital Research Institute. The conclusions, published in PLOS One, are based on analyses of about 1.2 millio ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-free-testosterone-canc

PSYCHOLOGY - Ketamine shows significant therapeutic benefit in people with treatment-resistant depression
Patients with treatment-resistant major depression saw dramatic improvement in their illness after treatment with ketamine, an anesthetic, according to the largest ketamine clinical trial to-date led by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The antidepressant benefits of ketamine were seen within 24 hours, whereas traditional antidepressants can take days or weeks to demonstrate a reduction in depression ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-ketamine-significant-t

PSYCHOLOGY - Now we know why old scizophrenia medicine works on antibiotics-resistant bacteria
In 2008 researchers from the University of Southern Denmark showed that the drug thioridazine, which has previously been used to treat schizophrenia, is also a powerful weapon against antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as staphylococci (Staphylococcus aureus) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-scizophrenia-medicine-

PSYCHOLOGY - The Psychological Test That Explains Why You're Bad at Communicating
It's not everyday that you come across a childhood game in a psychology experiment - particularly one that you thought that you had made up. But the "finger tapping" game gives us some insights into our past, and explains why people can't understand you when you think you're being clear as day.A few days ago I wrote about cryptomnesia, the phenomenon of people believing that they had invented a thought that they had in fact ...
http://io9.com/the-psychological-test-that-explains-why-your

PSYCHOLOGY - US psychiatry gets makeover in new manual
The latest makeover to a massive psychiatric tome honored by some, reviled by others and even called the "Bible" of mental disorders is being released Saturday with a host of new changes ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-psychiatry-makeover-ma

PSYCHOLOGY - Why Are There So Few Lefties in China?
Only 1 percent of people in China are left-handed, while the global average is 10-12 percent ...
http://news.discovery.com/human/life/why-are-there-few-left-

SKIN - Artificial Skin That's Way More Sensitive to Touch Than The Real Thing
Scientists have created a paper-thin flexible "skin" that can detect pressure that's a few hundred times lighter than a gentle touch. This new material could eventually make its way into artificial or robotic limbs - but for now researchers have found that it is absolutely amazing at reading a pulse. We recently told you about new artificial skin that's as sensitive to touch as our fingertips. That sensor was made out of piezoelectr ...
http://io9.com/artificial-skin-thats-way-more-sensitive-to-t

SLEEP - The Science of Insomnia
We've all experienced a sleepless night or two, and for some people that's actually the norm. But why do we experience insomnia at all? What is going on in our minds and bodies, to cause this awful condition? Here's what scientists know so far.The prevalence of insomnia in adults varies widely, depending on how the condition is defined. Most broadly, someone has insomnia if he or she simply suffers from difficulty falling asleep, waking up over a ...
http://io9.com/the-science-of-insomnia-50679852

SPIRITUALITY - Reading the unreadable: 'Unopenable' scrolls will yield their secrets to new X-ray system
Pioneering X-ray technology is making it possible to read fragile rolled-up historical documents for the first time in centuries. Old parchment is often extremely dry and liable to crack and crumble if any attempt is made to physically unroll or unfold it. The new technology, however, eliminates the need to do so by enabling parchment to be unrolled or unfolded 'virtually' and the contents displayed on a computer screen ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130516105612.ht

WATER - What America Will Look Like Under 25 Feet Of Sea Water
If climate models are correct, then Hurricane Sandy, and the flooding it brought, gave us a gentle preview of the not-so-distant future. A recent NASA study found that between 1992 and 2012, global sea levels rose, on average, a little more than one inch per year. That's much faster than climatologists had expected. See what could vanish when sea level rises > The trend is not reversing. Sea levels rise because of melting glaciers and ice shee ...
Jefferson 25 feet
http://www.businessinsider.com/us-city-sea-level-rise-maps-n

LONGEVITY - The Most Significant Futurists of the Past 50 Years

Our visions of the future tend to be forged in the pages of science fiction. But for the past half-century, a number of prominent thinkers, activists, and scientists have made significant contributions to our understanding of what the future could look like. Here are 10 recent futurists you absolutely need to know about.

Above image courtesy Dylan Cole.

A few months ago we told you about 9 historical figures who may have predicted our future. Now it's time to focus on major contributions made during the past five decades.

Needless to say, there were dozens upon dozens of amazing futurists who could have been included in this article, so it wasn't easy to pare down this list. But given the width and breadth of futurist discourse, we decided to select nine thinkers whose contributions should be considered seminal and highly influential to their field of study.

And as for any futurist I might have missed, please add to comments and let's discuss! But let's not get into futurists who are also scifi writers - that's a separate list I'll hit in the future.

1. Robert Ettinger

He's known as the intellectual father of the cryonics movement. Physicist Robert Ettinger, who only died recently and is currently in cryonic stasis, was an early advocate of immortalism, or what we would today call radical life extension. In his 1964 book, The Prospect of Immortality, Ettinger argued that whole body or head-only freezing should be used to place the recently deceased into a state of suspended animation for later revival. To that end, he made the case that governments should immediately start a mass-freezing program. He also believed that the onset of immortality would endow humanity with a higher, nobler nature.

"Someday there will be some sort of psychological trigger that will move all these people to take the practical steps they have not yet taken," he wrote, "When people realize that their children and grandchildren will enjoy indefinite life, that they may well be the last generation to die."

Today, organizations like Alcor and the Cryonics Institute (which he founded) have put his ideas into action.

Ettinger is also considered a pioneer in the transhumanist movement by virtue of his 1972 book, Man Into Superman.

Image: Christopher Barnatt/ExplainingTheFuture.

2. Shulamith Firestone

Back in 1970, at the tender age of 25, Shulamith Firestone kickstarted the cyberfeminist movement by virtue of her book, The Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution. To come up with her unique feminist philosophy, Firestone took 19th and 20th century socialist thinking and fused it with Freudian psychoanalysis and the existentialist perspectives of Simone de Beauvoir.

Firestone argued that gender inequality was the result of a patriarchal social structure that had been imposed upon women on account of their necessary role as incubators. She felt that pregnancy, childbirth, and child-rearing imposed physical, social, and psychological disadvantages upon women - and that the only way for women to free themselves from these biological impositions would be to seize control of reproduction. She advocated for the development of cybernetic and assistive reproductive technologies, including artificial wombs, gender selection, and in vitro fertilization. In addition, she advocated for the dissemination of contraception, abortion, and state support for child-rearing.

She would prove to be a major influence on later thinkers like Joanna Russ (author of "The Female Man"), sci-fi author Joan Slonczweski, and Donna Haraway (who we'll get to in just a bit).

3. I. J. Good

British mathematician I. J. Good was one of the first thinkers - if not the first - to properly articulate the problem that is the pending Technological Singularity. Predating Hans Moravec, Ray Kurzweil, and Vernor Vinge by several decades, Good penned an article in 1965 warning about the dramatic potential for recursively improving artificial intelligence.

He wrote:

Let an ultraintelligent machine be defined as a machine that can far surpass all the intellectual activities of any man however clever. Since the design of machines is one of these intellectual activities, an ultraintelligent machine could design even better machines; there would then unquestionably be an 'intelligence explosion,' and the intelligence of man would be left far behind. Thus the first ultraintelligent machine is the last invention that man need ever make.

The phrase intelligence explosion has since been adopted by futurists critical of "soft" Singularity scenarios, like a slow takeoff event, or Kurzweilian notions of the steady, accelerating growth of all technologies (including intelligence). His work has influenced AI theorists like Eliezer Yudkowsky, Ben Goertzel, and of course, the Machine Intelligence Research Institute (formerly the Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence).

Interestingly, Good served as a cryptologist at Bletchley Park with Alan Turing during World War II. He also worked as a consultant on supercomputers for Stanley Kubrick for the 1968 film, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Image: Guardian.

4. K. Eric Drexler

Back in 1959, the renowned physicist Richard Feynman delivered an extraordinary lecture titled "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom" in which he talked about the "experimental physics" of "manipulating and controlling things on a small scale." This idea largely languished, probably because it was ahead of its time. It wouldn't be until 1986 and the publication of K. Eric Drexler's Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology that the idea of molecular engineering would finally take root and take its modern form.

Drexler, by virtue of this book and his subsequent lectures and writings, was the first futurist to give coherency to the prospect of molecular nanotechnology. Given the potential for working at such a small scale, Drexler foresaw the rise of universal assemblers (also called molecular assemblers, or simply "fabs") - machines that can build objects atom by atom (basically Star Trek replicators). He predicted that we'll eventually use nanotech to clear the environment of toxins, grow rockets from a single seed, and create biocompatible robots that will be injected into our bodies. But unlike Robert Ettinger, Drexler actually came up with a viable technique for reanimating individuals in cryonic suspension; he envisioned fleets of molecular robots guided by sophisticated AI that would reconstruct a person thawed from liquid nitrogen.

But he also foresaw the negative consequences, such as weaponized nanotechnology and the potential for grey goo - an out-of-control scourge of self-replicating micro-machines.

As an aside, Drexler also predicted hypertext.

Image: New Scientist.

5. Timothy Leary

Timothy Leary is typically associated with drug culture and the phrase, "tune in, turn on, and drop out," but his contributions to futurism are just as significant - and surprisingly related. He developed his own futurist philosophy called S.M.I2.L.E, which stands for Space Migration, Increased Intelligence, and Life Extension. These ideas developed out of Leary's life-long interest in seeing humanity evolve beyond its outdated morality, which would prove to be highly influential within certain segments of the transhumanist community.

As a futurist, Leary is also important in that he was an early advocate for cognitive liberty and potential for neurodiversity. Through his own brand of psychedelic futurism, he argued that we have the right to modify our minds and create our own psychological experiences. He believed that each psychological modality - no matter how bizarre or unconventional - could still be ascribed a certain value. What's more, given the extreme nature of certain psychedelic experiences, he also demonstrated the potential for human consciousness to function beyond what's considered normal. More.

6. Donna Haraway

Donna Haraway made a name for herself after the publication of her 1984 essay, "A Manifesto for Cyborgs: Science, Technology, and Socialist Feminism in the 1980s." At the time, it was seen as a reaction to the rise of anti-technological ecofeminism, but it has since been interpreted and reinterpreted by everyone from postmodernist lefties through to transhumanist postgenderists.

Referring to Haraway as a Cyborgian Socialist-Feminist, the futurist and sociologist James Hughes describes her legacy this way:

Haraway argued that it was precisely in the eroding boundary between human beings and machines, and between women and machines in particular, that we can find liberation from the old patriarchal dualisms. Haraway says she would rather be a cyborg than a goddess, and proposes that the cyborg could be the liberatory mythos for women. This essay, and Haraway's subsequent writings, have inspired a new cultural studies sub-discipline of "cyborgology," made up of feminist culture and science fiction critics, exploring cyborgs and the woman-machine interface in various permutations.

And as Wired's Hari Kunzru noted, "Sociologists and academics from around the world have taken her lead and come to the same conclusion about themselves. In terms of the general shift from thinking of individuals as isolated from the "world" to thinking of them as nodes on networks, the 1990s may well be remembered as the beginning of the cyborg era."

7. Peter Singer

He's primarily regarded as a philosopher, ethicist, and animal rights advocate, but Princeton's Peter Singer has also made a significant impact to futurist discourse - albeit it through rather unconventional channels.

Singer, as a utilitarian, social progressive, and personhood-centered ethicist, has argued that the suffering of animals, especially apes and large mammals, should be put on par with the suffering of children and developmentally disabled adults. To that end, he founded the Great Ape Project, an initiative that seeks to confer basic legal rights to non-human great apes, namely chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans. It's a precursor to my own Rights of Non-Human Persons Program, which also includes dolphins, whales, elephants - and makes provisions for artificial intelligence. Singer has also suggested that chickens be genetically engineered so that they experience less suffering.

And in 2001, Singer's A Darwinian Left: Politics, Evolution, and Cooperation argued that there is a biological basis for human selfishness and hierarchy - one that has thwarted our attempts at egalitarian reform. What's needed, says Singer, is the application of new genetic and neurological sciences to identify and modify the aspects of human nature that cause conflict and competition - what today would be regarded as moral enhancement. He supports voluntary genetic improvement, but rejects coercive eugenic pseudo-science.

Image: Guardian.

8. Freeman Dyson

Theoretical physicist and mathematician Freeman Dyson is one of the first thinkers to consider the potential for megascale engineering projects.

His 1959 paper, "Search for Artificial Stellar Sources of Infrared Radiation," outlined a way for an advanced civilization to utilize all of the energy radiated by their sun - an idea that has since inspired other technologists to speculate about similar projects, like Matrioshka and J-Brains.

Image: JBIS.

9. Nick Bostrom

Swedish philosopher and neuroscientist Nick Bostrom is one of the finest futurists in the business, who is renowned for taking heady concepts to the next level. He has suggested, for example, that we may be living in a simulation, and that an artificial superintelligence may eventually take over the world - if not destroy us all together. And indeed, one of his primary concerns is in assessing the potential for existential risks. An advocate of transhumanism and human enhancement, he co-founded the World Transhumanist Association in 1998 (now Humanity+), and currently runs the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford.

Image: Nick Bostrom.

10. Aubrey de Grey

Love him or hate him, gerontologist Aubrey de Grey has revolutionized the way we look at human aging.

He's an advocate of radical life extension who believes that the application of advanced rejuvenation techniques may help many humans alive today live exceptionally long lives. What makes de Grey particularly unique is that he's the first gerontologist to put together an actual action plan for combating aging; he's one of the first thinkers to conceptualize aging as a disease unto itself. Rather than looking at the aging process as something that's inexorable or overly complicated, his macro-approach (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) consists of a collection of proposed techniques that would work to not just rejuvenate the human body, but to stop aging altogether.

Back in 2006, MIT's Technology Review offered $20,000 to any molecular biologist who could demonstrate that de Grey's SENS is "so wrong that it was unworthy of learned debate." No one was able to claim the prize. But a 2005 EMBO report concluded that none of his therapies "has ever been shown to extend the lifespan of any organism, let alone humans." Regardless of the efficacy of de Grey's approach, he represents the first generation of gerontologists to dedicate their work to the problem that is human aging. Moreover, he's given voice to the burgeoning radical life extension movement.

http://io9.com/the-most-significant-futurists-of-the-past-50-years-506