HEALTH PORTATION curated News August 30th

ALZHEIMERToward an early diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's disease
Despite all the research done on Alzheimer's, there is still no early diagnostic tool for the disease. By looking at the brain wave components of individuals with the disease, Professor Tiago H. Falk of INRS's Centre Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications has identified a promising avenue of research that may not only help diagnose the disease, but also assess its severity. This non-invasive, objective method is the subj ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-early-diagnostic-tool-


BRAIN - A glass of wine a day may keep depression away
We have all heard that drinking a glass of red wine in moderation may be good for our health. But now, researchers have found that drinking wine may also reduce the risk of depression, according to a study published in the journal BMC Medicine ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265401.ph


BRAIN - A potential cause of autism discovered
Problems with a key group of enzymes called topoisomerases can have profound effects on the genetic machinery behind brain development and potentially lead to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research announced in the journal Nature. Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have described a finding that represents a significant advance in the hunt for environmental factors behind autism and lends new insights ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/265388.ph


BRAIN - Fat Tuesday: Feed the Addict
A new study in the Journal of Neuroscience suggests that a part of the brain critical to motivation, the substantia nigra, which is famous for its role as a primary culprit in Parkinson’s Disease, is central to the relationship between feeding and drug seeking behavior ...
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/illusion-chasers/2013/08


BRAIN - Intellectual disability linked to nerve cells that lose their 'antennae'
An odd and little-known feature of nerve cells may be linked to several forms of inherited intellectual disability, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-intellectual-disabilit


BRAIN - Learning How the Brain Takes out Its Trash May Help Decode Neurological Diseases
Imagine that garbage haulers don't exist. Slowly, the trash accumulates in our offices, our homes, it clogs the streets and damages our cars, causes illness and renders normal life impossible ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829124347.ht


HEART - New collagen patch speeds repair of damaged heart tissue in mice
You can't resurrect a dead cell anymore than you can breathe life into a brick, regardless of what you may have gleaned from zombie movies and Dr. Frankenstein. So when heart cells die from lack of blood flow during a heart attack, replacing those dead cells is vital to the heart muscle's recovery ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-collagen-patch-heart-t


HEART - No contact with heart needed with new implanted defibrillator
A new type of defibrillator implanted under the skin can detect dangerously abnormal heart rhythms and deliver shocks to restore a normal heartbeat without wires touching the heart, according to research in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/265263.ph


HERBS - What is poison ivy? What is a poison ivy rash?
Poison ivy is a plant well known for causing severe inflammation of the skin, also known as contact dermatitis. The plant contains a sap which causes instant irritation if it comes in contact with the skin. Poison ivy is native to North America, where it mainly grows in clusters on the edges of woodland - where there is sufficient sunlight for it to grow ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265375.ph


LONGEVITY - England faces crisis in care for older people by 2032
Up to 160,000 older people in England will be left vulnerable in the next two decades as the country faces a huge shortfall in unpaid care, according to new LSE research published on August 23rd 2013 ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/265294.ph


LONGEVITY - Genetics: Live better longer
Biologists at the University of Fribourg have been looking at a threadworm gene which also occurs in humans. This gene could be central to a genetic system which is responsible for development, reproduction and the ageing process ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-genetics-longer.htm


LONGEVITY - Single gene change increases mouse lifespan by 20 percent
By lowering the expression of a single gene, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have extended the average lifespan of a group of mice by about 20 percent—the equivalent of raising the average human lifespan by 16 years, from 79 to 95. The research team targeted a gene called mTOR, which is involved in metabolism and energy balance, and may be connected with the increased lifespan associated with caloric restriction ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-gene-mouse-lifespan-pe


LONGEVITY - Biologists May Have Identified Gene Central to Development, Reproduction and Aging
Biologists at the University of Fribourg have been looking at a threadworm gene which also occurs in humans. This gene could be central to a genetic system which is responsible for development, reproduction and the ageing process ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829110029.ht


NEWS - A molecular delivery service
Tiny hair-like structures (cilia) are found on the surface of most cells. Cilia are responsible for the locomotion of cells (e.g. sperm cells), they process external signals and coordinate the correct arrangement of the inner organs during the development of an organism. For proper assembly and function of cilia, they need to be supplied with the appropriate building blocks ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-08-molecular-delivery.htm


NEWS - Babies May Remember Words Heard Before Birth
Study found repeated exposure to a 'pseudoword' during late stages of pregnancy led infant's brains to react to i ...
http://www.webmd.com/baby/news/20130826/babies-may-remember-


NEWS - Dueling Infections: Parasitic Worms Limit the Effects of Giardia, and Vice Versa
If the idea of hookworms makes you shudder, consider this: Those pesky intestinal parasites may actually help your body ward off other infections, and perhaps even prevent autoimmune and other diseases ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130830092456.ht


NEWS - Flavonoids: Little changes—large effects
Scientists at the University of York have discovered that very small chemical changes to dietary flavonoids cause very large effects when the plant natural products are tested for their impact on the human immune system ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-08-flavonoids-changeslarge-effects


NEWS - Membranes contain beautiful patterns—but their function is a mystery
Biological cells are surrounded by a membrane, and here some of the most important processes for sustaining life take place. There can also be something very beautiful happening in membranes, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have discovered: Membranes can contain beautiful, mysterious patterns ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-08-membranes-beautiful-patternsbut
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://cdn.physorg.com/newman/gfx/news/tmb/2013/membranescon


NEWS - Randomized Treatments May Be More Effective at Stopping Disease Outbreaks
Mathematicians have found that by varying the timing of treatments, doctors may be able to increase the odds that a disease outbreak will die off suddenl ...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=andomized-t


NEWS - Tylenol to Come With New Warning
Caps on bottles of the popular pain reliever Tylenol that are sold in the United States will soon come with warnings alerting consumers to the potential for liver failure and even death, the Associated Press reporte ...
http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/news/20130830/tylenol-n


NEWS - Where’s the Real Danger from Infection This Summer?
Naegleria fowleri is a summertime villain, scary and sensational, the “Brain-eating Amoeba.” Even the name is villainous. It is an amoeba that lives in fresh water, especially warm water, and is a cause of brain infections, almost always resulting in death ...
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/molecules-to-medicine/20



NEWS-CANCER - Bad to the Bone: Some Breast Cancer Cells Are Primed to Thrive
When a cancer cell sloughs off the edge of a tumor in the breast, it faces a tough road to survive. The cell must not only remain physically intact as it rushes through blood vessels, but it also must find a new organ to lodge itself in, take in enough nutrients and oxygen to stay alive, and begin dividing, all while escaping notice by the body's immune system ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829123439.ht


NEWS-CANCER - Collagen Clue Reveals New Drug Target for Untreatable Form of Lung Cancer
Collagen, the stuff of ligaments and skin, and the most abundant protein in the human body, has an extraordinary role in triggering chemical signals that help protect the body from cancer, a new study reveals ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829214744.ht


NEWS-CANCER - Liver cancer due to chronic inflammation: Tumour growth follows programmed cell death (apoptosis)
The death of numerous liver cells in the context of chronic inflammation due to apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, can promote the formation of tumour cells in the liver. This insight significantly contributes to a better understanding of cellular processes in liver cancer development and thereby opens up new therapeutic approaches. A research team including scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München has reported this in the curr ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-liver-cancer-due-chron


NEWS-CANCER - Living With Cancer: Is It Back?
I thought about the boring self-absorption of illness during a queasy day after eating a breakfast of smoked salmon leftovers from a party for out-of-town visitors. “What can a sick man say, but that he is sick?” Samuel Johnson asked back in the 18th century. “His thoughts are necessarily concentrated in himself; he neither receives nor can give delight; his inquiries are after alleviations of pain. ...
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/29/living-with-cancer-


NEWS-CANCER - New imaging technology promising for several types of cancer
Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center have published findings that a new form of imaging—PET/MRI—is promising for several types of cancer. In an article titled "PET/MRI: Applications in Clinical Imaging," published in the September issue of Current Radiology Reports, the authors outline their initial clinical experience in diagnosing and staging cancer patients with this novel technology ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-imaging-technology-can
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://s.ph-cdn.com/newman/gfx/news/tmb/2013/3-newimagingte.


PSYCHOLOGY - Kids' attitudes toward disabled people improve with contact
Children's attitudes toward people with disabilities improve when kids have more contact with them, according to a new study ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-kids-attitudes-disable


PSYCHOLOGY - Living in poverty has the same effect on the brain as regularly going without sleep
“What we’re arguing is it’s not about the individual. It’s about the situation,” said one researche ...
http://www.salon.com/2013/08/30/living_in_poverty_has_the_sa
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://media.salon.com/2012/09/poverty_rect-150x150.jp


PSYCHOLOGY - Men feel worse about themselves when female partners succeed, says new research
Deep down, men may not bask in the glory of their successful wives or girlfriends. While this is not true of women, men's subconscious self-esteem may be bruised when their spouse or girlfriend excels, says a study published by the American Psychological Association ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-men-worse-female-partn


PSYCHOLOGY - Poor people aren't stupid; bad decisions are from being overwhelmed, study finds
Being poor affects your ability to think, a new study shows. Those coping with severe financial stress don't have the mental bandwidth to deal with all of life’s troubles, a team of researchers reported Thursday. They’ve done a series of tests that show when people are flush with cash, they can stop worrying and make better decisions. But having financial woes takes up so much attention, they often make poor decisions ....
http://inplainsight.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/08/29/20247880-po
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://media2.s-nbcnews.com/i/MSNBC/Components/Photo/_new/13


PSYCHOLOGY - Psychologists Identify the Best Ways to Study
Some study techniques accelerate learning, whereas others are just a waste of time—but which ones are which? An unprecedented review maps out the best pathways to knowledg ...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=psychologis


PSYCHOLOGY - Quiz: Put Your Study Skills to the Test
Think you study like a straight-A student? Knowing how to study can be just as important as what you are studying. Good learning techniques allow you to tackle new information and efficiently recall previous lessons—abilities that are just as useful in the workplace as in a classroom. Researchers studying education and cognition have taken a closer look at which approaches best support learning. For a roundup of the best and worst techniques see ...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=test-your-s


PSYCHOLOGY - Research suggests perfectionism and work motivation contribute to workaholism
Research from psychologists at the University of Kent suggests that being a perfectionist and highly motivated at work contributes directly to being a workaholic ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-perfectionism-contribu


PSYCHOLOGY - Shorter Workweek May Not Increase Well-Being
Think a shorter workweek will make you happier? Maybe not, a new study suggests. South Korea changed its labor regulations in 2004, reducing the work week to five days a week and 40 hours from the previous six-day, 44-hour week, providing a natural experiment to test whether working fewer hours would increase happiness ...

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/28/shorter-workweek-ma
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/08/29/health/29well


PSYCHOLOGY - Your spouse's voice is easier to hear—and easier to ignore
With so many other competing voices, having a conversation on a bustling subway or at a crowded cocktail party takes a great deal of concentration. New research suggests that the familiar voice of a spouse stands out against other voices, helping to sharpen auditory perception and making it easier to focus on one voice at a time ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-spouse-voice-easier-he


SKIN - Skin and food allergies can be result of skin cell 'glue' defeciency
In a new study published in Nature Genetics, Northwestern Medicine and Tel Aviv University scientists have found that a structural defect in skin cells can contribute to allergy development, including skin and food allergies, traditionally thought primarily to be a dysfunction of the immune system ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/265266.ph


SLEEP - "Human Sleep Project" Could Unlock the Secrets to a Good Night’s Rest
Everyone knows the crankiness, puffy eyes and excessive yawning that follow a bad night's sleep. Those chronically sleep-deprived also have increased risks of heart disease, obesity and early death. Because sleep patterns are difficult to monitor in large populations, researchers do not know what causes many sleep problems or how exactly these problems affect us ...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=human-sleep


SLEEP - Brain imaging study reveals the wandering mind behind insomnia
A new brain imaging study may help explain why people with insomnia often complain that they struggle to concentrate during the day even when objective evidence of a cognitive problem is lacking ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-brain-imaging-reveals-


SLEEP - Study reveals the face of sleep deprivation
A new study finds that sleep deprivation affects facial features such as the eyes, mouth and skin, and these features function as cues of sleep loss to other people ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-reveals-deprivation.ht


SPIRITUALITY - Student helps discover priestess tomb
Matthew Go, a 20-year-old Simon Fraser University archaeology undergraduate student in the Faculty of Environment, can now add priestess-tomb discoverer to his list of accomplishments on his résumé ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-08-student-priestess-tomb.htm
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://cdn.physorg.com/newman/gfx/news/tmb/2013/2-studenthel


VITAMINS - Potential diagnostic marker for zinc status offers insights into the effects of zinc deficiency
According to new research published in The FASEB Journal, a drop in blood zinc levels does not directly harm the blood vessel cells. Rather, zinc regulates the production of a small molecular compound, which then circulates in the blood and causes harmful blood vessel cell effects ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-potential-diagnostic-m


WEIGHT - Does Low-Fat Yogurt Make You Fat?
It sounds like an oxymoron but low-fat yogurt may be more fattening than you think—at least for some people under some conditions. That is just one of the counterintuitive ideas behind new research to study the effects of a physiological condition known as insulin resistance in driving weight gain and obesity ...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=taubes-vide


WEIGHT - Is Obesity an Addiction?
New brain research is revealing why fats and sugars may be driving more and more people toward obesit ...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=is-obesity-


WEIGHT - Tooth sensors can aid weight loss and fight cavities
Scientists create a Wi-Fi-enabled mouth sensor that collects data to help improve eating habits and dental health If you need help counting calories or keeping track of what you eat, here’s some mobile news you can really chew on. Scientists from National Taiwan University have created a Wi-Fi-enabled sensor that can be embedded in the mouth to collect data on eating habits, dental health and even who’s sneaking cigarettes ...

http://www.salon.com/2013/08/30/tooth_sensors_can_help_speed
Enclosure: image/png http://media.salon.com/2013/08/tooth-sensor-150x150.pn


WEIGHT - Turning the tables on obesity and BMI: When more can be better.
I want to point out this interesting analysis in Science of a counterintuitive trend noticed in the last few years, the fact that BMI is not a foolproof predictor of mortality and that being overweight can actually be better for you. The discussion illuminates the complex relationship between body weight and fat, demonstrates the limitation of using BMI as a health metric and underscores the appreciation that “fat”, far from being a monolithic en ...
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/the-curious-wavefunction