HEALTH PORTATION curated News September 30th

ALZHEIMER - Newly identified antibodies effectively treat Alzheimer's-like disease in mice
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of particular toxic proteins in the brain that are believed to underlie the cognitive decline in patients. A new study conducted in mice suggests that newly identified antibody treatments can prevent the accumulation of one of these of these toxic components, called tau proteins. The findings suggest that these antibodies may provide a basis for a promising therapy for patients with Alzheim ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130926123326.ht


BRAIN - Aging Brain May Have More Trouble With Financial Decisions: Study
Older people also tend to tolerate less financial risk, research suggest .. ...
Even on a small scale, being generous creates a
http://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/news/20130930/aging-brain


BRAIN - Ballet Dancers' Brains Adapt to Resist Dizziness
Why can dancers spin without getting disoriented -- and could the answer help patients who are chronically dizzy? Continue reading .. ...
http://news.discovery.com/human/health/how-long-can-you-spin


BRAIN - Finding the place where the brain creates illusory shapes and surfaces
Neuroscientists have identified the location in the brain's visual cortex responsible for generating a common perceptual illusion: Seeing shapes and surfaces that don't really exist when viewing a fragmented background .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130930152729.ht


BRAIN - Small brain biopsies can be used to grow patient's own brain cells
Scientists have grown brain cells in the laboratory that may be re-integrated into patients' brains to treat neurological conditions. Research shows biopsied brain cells can be used to grow new healthy cells with powerful attributes to protect the brain from future injury. These cells may hopefully yield specific cell types needed for particular treatments, or cross the "blood-brain barrier" as specific therapeutic agents released directly into t ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130930114109.ht


BRAIN - We Are Constrained By Our Own Brains
We the caregivers have a tendency to give up, or to stop trying. Our brains tells us - we can't do it. Our own brains can be our biggest enemy when it comes to effective, loving, caring.By +Bob DeMarco+Alzheimer's Reading Room How to Deal with Odd Behaviors Caused by Dementia?I read Elaine Pereira's article, Christmas Memories Past and Present, with great interest.In her own words Elaine wrote:"I especially recall my mom's bizarre, dementia induc ...
How to Stop Odd Behaviors Caused by Dementia
http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2013/09/Constrained-By-


BRAIN - Why Older People Tend to Be Poor Decision-Makers
It’s not just dementia and cognitive decline that makes people more uncertain with age; changes in rationality and the way the elderly evaluate risk could explain why they are more likely to make the wrong decisions affecting everything from their health to their finances. While numerous studies have documented a drop in cognitive function with age, there isn’t solid data to explain what drives this decline in decision-making, particu ...
http://healthland.time.com/2013/09/30/why-older-people-tend-


BRAIN - 5 Myths and Facts About MS
WebMD helps you separate myths and facts about multiple sclerosis, including the truth about MS and pregnancy, exercise, and work .. ...
http://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclerosis/features/5-myths-and


BRAIN - Anxiety stinks, study shows
Many of us have experienced the calming effects of lovely smells like jasmine or lavender. But a new study has shown that anxiety can cause the brain to transform neutral odors to negative ones, creating a "vicious cycle," whereby stress is heightened.. .. ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266664.ph


BRAIN - Bionic leg is controlled by brain power
The act of walking may not seem like a feat of agility, balance, strength and brainpower. But lose a leg, as Zac Vawter did after a motorcycle accident in 2009, and you will appreciate the myriad calculations that go into putting one foot in front of the other .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-bionic-leg-brain-power


BRAIN - Bothersome tinnitus linked to neuroticism
People with 'neurotic' tendencies are more likely to be troubled by their tinnitus, a new study involving researchers at The University of Nottingham, has found .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-bothersome-tinnitus-li


COOK - How to make chocolate out of nothing
How do you make chocolate out of nothing? Mariano Tomatis demonstrates in this delicious twist on the missing square puzzle, aka Curry's Triangle Paradox.Read more.. .. ...
http://io9.com/how-to-make-chocolate-out-of-nothing-14292027


COOK - How to make fruit pastilles
Making your own chewy sweets is a great way to use up a glut of autumn fruit, and kids will love cutting chunks of jelly and pressing them into sugarMy kids don't especially like jelly as a pudding. The wibble-wobble just doesn't appeal. A jellied sweet, however, is quite another thing. Dense, dark, chewy fruit pastilles, sparkling with sugar, are a favourite if any pocket money comes their way on a Saturday morning.The sweet shop near our house ...
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/sep/27/how-to-m


COOK - Spicy three-bean chipotle chili [Vegan]
This chili packs a bit of heat, with a tangy finish .. ...
http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/spicy-thre


DIABETES - Biological link between diabetes and heart disease discovered
Researchers have identified for the first time a biological pathway that is activated when blood sugar levels are abnormally high and causes irregular heartbeats, a condition known as cardiac arrhythmia that is linked with heart failure and sudden cardiac death .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130930121852.ht


DIABETES - New map of insulin pathway could lead to better diabetes drugs
A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has created the first comprehensive roadmap of the protein interactions that enable cells in the pancreas to produce, store and secrete the hormone insulin. The finding makes possible a deeper scientific understanding of the insulin secretion process—and how it fails in insulin disorders such as type 2 diabetes .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-insulin-pathway-diabet


DIABETES - Big breakfast rich in protein and fat improves blood sugar control and makes people feel fuller than a small breakfast in adults with type 2 diabetes
A big breakfast rich in protein and fat appears to offer more benefits to people with type 2 diabetes than a smaller low calorie breakfast, concludes research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.. .. ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/266666.ph


DIABETES - Study identifies immune cells that promote growth of beta cells in type 1 diabetes
Joslin researchers have identified immune cells that promote growth of beta cells in type 1 diabetes. This study provides further evidence of a changed role for immune cells in type 1 diabetes pathology. The study appears online today and will also appear in the January issue of Diabetes .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-immune-cells-growth-be


DIABETES - U.S. approves first artificial pancreas system for diabetics
(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first artificial pancreas system for diabetics that reads blood sugar levels and automatically shuts off the flow of insulin .. ...
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/27/us-medtronic-fda-d


EXERCISE - Leisure-time exercise could lower your risk of high blood pressure
Physical activity in your leisure time could help keep your blood pressure at a healthy level, new research in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension suggests .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-leisure-time-high-bloo


HEART - Treating heart failure with exercise: How much is enough?
More than 14 million Europeans suffer from heart failure, roughly half of which is caused by diastolic heart failure, known by doctors as HFPEF. OptimEx, a new 3.5-year study funded by the European Union and coordinated by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), will look at whether exercise could be used both to prevent and treat HFPEF .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-heart-failure_1.htm


NEWS - Centipede venom could lead to new class of pain drug
A protein found in centipede venom could be developed into a drug to treat chronic pain that is as effective as morphine but without the side effects, researchers say .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-centipede-venom-class-


NEWS - NIH study identifies gene for alcohol preference in rats
Research advances understanding of genetics in alcohol consumption .. ...
http://www.nih.gov/news/health/sep2013/niaaa-30.ht


NEWS - Vacuum dust: A previously unknown disease vector
The aerosolized dust created by vacuums contain bacteria and mold that "could lead to adverse effects in allergic people, infants, and people with compromised immunity," according to researchers at the University of Queensland and Laval University. Their findings are published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-09-vacuum-previously-unknown-disea


NEWS - What works for women doesn't work for men
Flushed face, sweating, a sudden rush of heat. The hot flash, the bane of menopausal women, also can affect men who are undergoing hormone therapy for prostate cancer .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-women-doesnt-men.htm


NEWS - When cells 'eat' their own power plants: Scientists solve mystery of basic cellular process
A team of scientists reports that they have solved the mystery of a basic biological function essential to cellular health. By discovering a mechanism by which mitochondria signal that they need to be eliminated, the team has opened the door to potential research into cures for disorders such as Parkinson's disease that are believed to be caused by dysfunctional mitochondria in neurons .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130930140518.ht


NEWS - When cells 'eat' their own power plants: Scientists solve mystery of cellular process
A mix of serendipity and dogged laboratory work allowed a diverse team of University of Pittsburgh scientists to report in the Oct. 1 issue of Nature Cell Biology that they had solved the mystery of a basic biological function essential to cellular health .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-09-cells-power-scientists-mystery-


NEWS - Safer anesthesia and sounder sleep: Going beyond 'not killing as many people'
Life before anesthesia was horrific. Operations were incredibly painful. Many patients facing surgery suffered anxiety worse than the condition their surgery was supposed to fix .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-safer-anesthesia-sound


NEWS - Tweaking Mother Nature's chemistry box
Natural enzymes are very clever molecular machines. They are the catalyst for many of nature's chemical transformations. And the conditions they need to perform their task are rather precisely defined. There is a need to study enzymes, in order to adapt them as a means to harness their power for industrial scale chemical processes. For example enzymes included in washing machine detergent contribute to helping making the laundry clean. But they n ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-09-tweaking-mother-nature-chemistr


NEWS - Why humans are musical but apes are not
Why don't apes have musical talent, while humans, parrots, small birds, elephants, whales, and bats do? Matz Larsson, senior physician at the Lung Clinic at Orebro University Hospital, attempts to answer this question in the scientific publication Animal Cognition. In his article, he asserts that the ability to mimic and imitate things like music and speech is the result of the fact that synchronised group movement quite simply makes it possible ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/266618.ph


NEWS-CANCER - Capturing cancer: Liquid biopsy could improve cancer diagnosis and treatment
A microfluidic chip developed at the University of Michigan is among the best at capturing elusive circulating tumor cells from blood—and it can support the cells' growth for further analysis .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-09-capturing-cancer-liquid-biopsy-


NEWS-CANCER - New study shows blood test detected cancer metastasis
Researchers from the University Göttingen Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Chronix Biomedical have published a new study exploring the genetic hallmarks of canine mammary cancer. Appearing in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE, the paper identifies important similarities and differences between human and canine breast tumors, providing a strong platform for future research using the canine model system .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-blood-cancer-metastasi


NEWS-CANCER - Childhood cancer survivors at higher risk of renal failure
In a new study, adult survivors of childhood cancers who had certain chemotherapy treatments or kidney surgery had worse kidney function that did not recover over time. Researchers say this means they may be at higher risk for premature chronic renal failure. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 20 million people in the US aged 20 years or older suffer from chronic renal failure.. .. ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266589.ph


PSYCHOLOGY - Mine: So much life is contained in such small things. What holds meaning to you?
Brenda Funk 45, Rockville, photographer, writer Read full article >&#62 .. ...
http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/mine-so-muc


PSYCHOLOGY - Setting blurred images in motion improves perception
Blurred images that are unidentifiable as still pictures become understandable once the images are set in motion. That's because of a phenomenon called "optic flow"—which may be especially relevant as a source of visual information in people with low vision, reports a study 'With an Eye to Low Vision: Optic Flow Enables Perception Despite Image Blur' (published online ahead of print, September 3, 2013) in the October issue of Optometry and Vision ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-blurred-images-motion-


PSYCHOLOGY - Is your nose making you overeat?
Fruit flies overeat when they smell something tasty; what about you? Some people are drawn to the thick smell of bacon, sizzling and crackling in the skillet on a Saturday morning. For others,...-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.co .. ...
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/food-matters/2013/09/30/


SLEEP - Autistic kids have poorer sleep quality than their peers right up to their teens
Children with autistic spectrum disorders have poorer sleep quality than their peers right up to their teens, reveals research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-autistic-kids-poorer-q


SLEEP - New study offers evidence of a link between staying up late and risk of depression
They say the early bird catches the worm, but night owls may be missing far more than just a tasty snack. Researchers have discovered evidence of structural brain differences that distinguish early risers from people who like to stay up late. The differences might help explain why night owls seem to be at greater risk of depression. Read full article >&#62 .. ...
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/new-st


ALZHEIMER - Newly identified antibodies effectively treat Alzheimer's-like disease in mice

Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of particular toxic proteins in the brain that are believed to underlie the cognitive decline in patients. A new study conducted in mice suggests that newly identified antibody treatments can prevent the accumulation of one of these of these toxic components, called tau proteins. The findings suggest that these antibodies may provide a basis for a promising therapy for patients with Alzheim ...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130926123326.ht

BRAIN - Aging Brain May Have More Trouble With Financial Decisions: Study

Older people also tend to tolerate less financial risk, research suggest ...

Even on a small scale, being generous creates a

http://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/news/20130930/aging-brain-may-have-

BRAIN - Ballet Dancers' Brains Adapt to Resist Dizziness

Why can dancers spin without getting disoriented -- and could the answer help patients who are chronically dizzy? Continue reading ...

http://news.discovery.com/human/health/how-long-can-you-spin-without-g

BRAIN - Finding the place where the brain creates illusory shapes and surfaces

Neuroscientists have identified the location in the brain's visual cortex responsible for generating a common perceptual illusion: Seeing shapes and surfaces that don't really exist when viewing a fragmented background ...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130930152729.ht

BRAIN - Small brain biopsies can be used to grow patient's own brain cells

Scientists have grown brain cells in the laboratory that may be re-integrated into patients' brains to treat neurological conditions. Research shows biopsied brain cells can be used to grow new healthy cells with powerful attributes to protect the brain from future injury. These cells may hopefully yield specific cell types needed for particular treatments, or cross the "blood-brain barrier" as specific therapeutic agents released directly into t ...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130930114109.ht

BRAIN - We Are Constrained By Our Own Brains

We the caregivers have a tendency to give up, or to stop trying. Our brains tells us - we can't do it. Our own brains can be our biggest enemy when it comes to effective, loving, caring.By +Bob DeMarco+Alzheimer's Reading Room How to Deal with Odd Behaviors Caused by Dementia?I read Elaine Pereira's article, Christmas Memories Past and Present, with great interest.In her own words Elaine wrote:"I especially recall my mom's bizarre, dementia induc ...

How to Stop Odd Behaviors Caused by Dementia

http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2013/09/Constrained-By-Brain-Deme

BRAIN - Why Older People Tend to Be Poor Decision-Makers

It’s not just dementia and cognitive decline that makes people more uncertain with age; changes in rationality and the way the elderly evaluate risk could explain why they are more likely to make the wrong decisions affecting everything from their health to their finances. While numerous studies have documented a drop in cognitive function with age, there isn’t solid data to explain what drives this decline in decision-making, particu ...

http://healthland.time.com/2013/09/30/why-older-people-tend-to-be-poor

BRAIN - 5 Myths and Facts About MS

WebMD helps you separate myths and facts about multiple sclerosis, including the truth about MS and pregnancy, exercise, and work ...

http://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclerosis/features/5-myths-and-facts-abo

BRAIN - Anxiety stinks, study shows

Many of us have experienced the calming effects of lovely smells like jasmine or lavender. But a new study has shown that anxiety can cause the brain to transform neutral odors to negative ones, creating a "vicious cycle," whereby stress is heightened.. ...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266664.ph

BRAIN - Bionic leg is controlled by brain power

The act of walking may not seem like a feat of agility, balance, strength and brainpower. But lose a leg, as Zac Vawter did after a motorcycle accident in 2009, and you will appreciate the myriad calculations that go into putting one foot in front of the other ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-bionic-leg-brain-power.htm

BRAIN - Bothersome tinnitus linked to neuroticism

People with 'neurotic' tendencies are more likely to be troubled by their tinnitus, a new study involving researchers at The University of Nottingham, has found ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-09-bothersome-tinnitus-linked-neuro

COOK - How to make chocolate out of nothing

How do you make chocolate out of nothing? Mariano Tomatis demonstrates in this delicious twist on the missing square puzzle, aka Curry's Triangle Paradox.Read more.. ...

http://io9.com/how-to-make-chocolate-out-of-nothing-142920276

COOK - How to make fruit pastilles

Making your own chewy sweets is a great way to use up a glut of autumn fruit, and kids will love cutting chunks of jelly and pressing them into sugarMy kids don't especially like jelly as a pudding. The wibble-wobble just doesn't appeal. A jellied sweet, however, is quite another thing. Dense, dark, chewy fruit pastilles, sparkling with sugar, are a favourite if any pocket money comes their way on a Saturday morning.The sweet shop near our house ...

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/sep/27/how-to-make-fruit-

COOK - Spicy three-bean chipotle chili [Vegan]

This chili packs a bit of heat, with a tangy finish ...

http://www.treehugger.com/easy-vegetarian-recipes/spicy-three-bean-chi