HEALTH PORTATION curated News October 30th

ALZHEIMER - High blood sugar makes Alzheimer’s plaque more toxic to the brain
High blood-sugar levels, such as those linked with Type 2 diabetes, make beta amyloid protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease dramatically more toxic to cells lining blood vessels in the brain, according to a new study .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029090345.ht


ALZHEIMER - New Batch of Alzheimer's Genes Discovered
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=174835


BRAIN - 'Ancient brain' helps us interpret edges
Scientists from Australia believe they have found the brain cells that recognize patterns. And, surprisingly, they were not in the "modern" part of the brain, but in the thalamus, or "ancient" brain. The findings, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, throw new light on how our brains interpret shapes, particularly edges. "Our vision cells respond to different information - some to color, some to brightness, and now we've found the ones that ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268116.ph


BRAIN - A therapeutic hypothesis for glucose intolerance after cerebral ischemia
Interestingly, a recent study found that ischemic stress causes hyperglycemia and may worsen ischemic neuronal damage. In addition, decreased insulin sensitivity after ischemic stress seems to be involved in the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance. However, the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the development of glucose intolerance following ischemic stress still remains unclear .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-therapeutic-hypothesis


BRAIN - How poverty molds the brain
Groundbreaking research nearly two decades ago linking a mother's educational background to her children's literacy and cognitive abilities stands out among decades of social science studies demonstrating the adverse effects of poverty. Now new research has taken that finding in a neuroscientific direction: linking poor processing of auditory information in the adolescent brain to a lower maternal educational background
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029171836.ht


BRAIN - Increased iron in brain 'may be marker for MS'
Diagnosing multiple sclerosis is not a simple process. It is often a question of ruling out other possibilities for the symptoms a patient is suffering and can be time-consuming. But researchers from The University of Western Ontario, Canada, may have found a way of speeding things up. Iron deposits in the brain are a common feature of multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is not known if these are a cause or effect of the disease. Ravi Menon, PhD,
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268055.ph


BRAIN - Is left-handedness higher among those suffering from psychosis?
Researchers have long studied the connections between hand dominance and different aspects of the human brain. A new study out today in SAGE Open finds that among those with mental illnesses, left-handers are more likely to suffer from psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia than mood disorders .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-left-handedness-higher


BRAIN - New Imaging Device Gives Insights Into Hearing
A new  brain imaging machine, unveiled at an Australian university on Tuesday, will help scientists better understand how the brain processes information from hearing devices. It’s the first time researchers have been able to measure brain function of people with cochlear implants using an imaging technique called MEG, or magnetoencephalography. More common techniques interfere with electric impulses in the devices, notes the Sydney Morning Heral ...
http://healthland.time.com/2013/10/30/new-imaging-device-giv


BRAIN - New video looks at the chemistry of fear
With Halloween just a few days away, millions are flocking to horror films and haunted houses for their annual dose of terror. The latest video from the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Bytesize Science series uncovers the chemistry behind the spine-tingling sense of fear. "Fear is the expectation or the anticipation of possible harm.. ..
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268041.ph


BRAIN - Poverty May Harm a Child's Brain Development, Study Suggests

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=174848


BRAIN - RNA build-up linked to dementia and motor neuron disease
A new toxic entity associated with genetically inherited forms of dementia and motor neuron disease has been identified by scientists at the UCL Institute of Neurology. The toxin is the result of a genetic mutation that leads to the production of RNA molecules which could be responsible for the diseases. The findings are published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-rna-build-up-linked-de


BRAIN - Scientists shed light on brain computations
(Medical Xpress)—University of Queensland (UQ) scientists have made a fundamental breakthrough into how the brain decodes the visual world .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-scientists-brain.htm


BRAIN - Treating jet lag using VIP molecule
A brain chemical that desynchronizes the cells in the biological clock helps the clock adjust more quickly to abrupt shifts in daily light/dark schedules such as those that plague modern life A small molecule called VIP, known to synchronize time-keeping neurons in the brain's biological clock, has the startling effect of desynchronizing them at higher dosages, says a resear.. .. ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268029.ph


CHOLESTEROL - A mimic of 'good cholesterol' could someday treat cardiovascular and other diseases
A new type of "good cholesterol," made in the lab, could one day deliver drugs to where they are needed in the body to treat disease or be used in medical imaging, according to scientists. Their report on the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) mimic, which is easy to make in large amounts, appears in the journal ACS Nano .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-10-mimic-good-cholesterol-cardiova


CHOLESTEROL - HDL cholesterol controls blood glucose
High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), the so-called "good" cholesterol improves blood glucose levels by enhancing skeletal muscle function and reducing adiposity, scientists of the Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen report in the current issue of the American Heart Association Journal Circulation .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-hdl-cholesterol-blood-


COOK - After five attempts, and a ton of sugar, I finally figured out how to make sugar glass. 
I present to you, Death Cupcakes.

http://imgur.com/gallery/28HRmW


DIABETES - How fat could help solve part of the diabetes problem
The pancreas is a large organ that wraps around our gut, and produces the exact amount of insulin our bodies need when we eat -- except when we start to develop diabetes, and insulin production slows down. Scientists describe how a fat recycling system within pancreatic "beta cells" determines the amount of insulin they secrete, and so may provide a target for future diabetes therapies .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029092032.ht


EXERCISE - Before Marathoners Had Energy Bars 
Long before there was an industry supplying athletes with high-tech energy fuel, marathoners had to make due with what they had. And what they had may disgust you.
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/10/30/241848010/before


EXERCISE - Depression treated and even prevented by moderate exercise
Physical activity is being increasingly recognized as an effective tool to treat depression. PhD candidate George Mammen's review published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has taken the connection one step further, finding that moderate exercise can actually prevent episodes of depression in the long term. This is the first longitudinal review to focus exclusively on the role that exercise plays in maintaining ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268037.ph


FOODS - Baking blueberries changes their polyphenol content—and possibly their health benefits
Blueberries are called a "superfood" for their high polyphenol content, but when served as warm, gooey pie filling or when lending bursts of sweet flavor to a muffin, their "super" health benefits change. Scientists studied how cooking and baking affect the increasingly popular fruit's polyphenols and reported their mixed findings—levels of some of these substances rose while others fell—in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-10-blueberries-polyphenol-contenta


FOODS - Beer brewing comes clean
Behind a simple glass of cold beer lies a quiet industrial revolution promising to take the brewing industry by storm. Although the world's breweries have been recovering CO2 from the brewing process for other industrial uses for almost two decades, the process can consume copious amounts of energy and water .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-10-beer-brewing.htm


FOODS - Health Tip: Getting Rid of Refrigerator Odors

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=174844


HEART - First aid teams set to improve heart attack survival with pocket manual
30 October 2013: First aid teams are set to improve the survival of heart attack patients with the first pocket-sized manual on acute cardiac conditions. The toolkit was created by expert members of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) to help first aid teams across Europe make the best decisions in seconds after a heart attack .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-aid-teams-heart-surviv


HEART - Gradual heart attack pain means bigger treatment delay
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Sudden tightness in your chest? Shooting pain down your left arm? Everyone knows that could be a heart attack. But what if symptoms aren't so sudden .. ...
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/10/30/us-gradual-heart-a


HEART - Nerve stimulation in neck may reduce heart failure symptoms
A multidisciplinary team of experts in heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, and neurosurgery at The Mount Sinai Hospital are now testing nerve stimulation in the neck as a novel therapy for heart failure patients to potentially help relieve their debilitating symptoms of fatigue, shortness of breath, and heart arrhythmias, while reducing their hospitalizations .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-nerve-neck-heart-failu


HEART - Personalized preventive care best for older heart patients
Strategies to prevent heart attack, stroke and other major cardiac events should be individualized for older adults who should play a role in choosing their therapies, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published in its journal Circulation.. .. ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268039.ph


HEART - Significant cardiac treatment imbalance nationally
A multi-center team has published a first-of-its-kind study that examines unequal growth in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) centers relative to population and heart attack prevalence across the United States .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029101525.ht


LONGEVITY - 64-year old man defies age and gets in killer shape (18 Photos & Video)
.. ...
64-year-old-man-gets-fit-15
http://thechive.com/2013/10/30/64-year-old-man-defies-age-an


NEWS - 'Molecular Velcro' may lead to cost-effective alternatives to natural antibodies
Taking inspiration from the human immune system, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created a new material that can be programmed to identify an endless variety of molecules. The new material resembles tiny sheets of Velcro, each just one-hundred nanometers across. But instead of securing your sneakers, this molecular Velcro mimics the way natural antibodies recognize viruses a ...
http://phys.org/news/2013-10-molecular-velcro-cost-effective


NEWS - 4 Steps To Detox From Fluoride and Heavy Metals
By: Marianna Pochelli, Prevent Disease. Your body is naturally equipped with a self-sufficient detoxification process. But too much sugar, caffeine, processed foods, fluoride, vaccines,...This is a summary of the article, please click on the link to visit our website to view the full article. Thank you
http://www.trueactivist.com/4-steps-to-detox-from-fluoride-a


NEWS - A Blood Test for Fibromyalgia?

http://www.healthcentral.com/chronic-pain/c/5949/159421/diagnostic-fibromyalgia


NEWS - Better use of lighting in hospital rooms may improve patients' health
A new study suggests that changing the lighting patterns in hospital rooms so that they're more aligned with normal sleep-wake cycles could help patients feel better with less fatigue and pain. Published early online in the Journal of Advanced Nursing, the findings point to a simple and inexpensive way to potentially improve patient care ..
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-hospital-rooms-patient


NEWS - Canadian discoveries pivotal to science of toxins, illness associated with E. coli
Many Canadian scientists and clinicians were unsung heroes during the early years (1977–1983) of research unfolding around verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC). In an article published today, a clinician and medical microbiologist documents the history of this area of study, focusing on the key discoveries and major contributions made by Canadians to the science of what many people refer to as "hamburger disease. .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029133546.ht


NEWS - Novel technique for suturing tissue-engineered collagen graft improves tendon repair
The repair of ruptured tendons often requires the use of a graft to bridge gaps between the torn tendon and bone. A tissue-engineered collagen graft can reduce the complications associated with other types of tendon grafts, but it may not be able to support full load bearing until integrated into the surrounding tissue. A new suture technique designed to support this tissue-engineered tendon is described in BioResearch Open Access, a peer-reviewe ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-technique-suturing-tis


NEWS - The 2013 Geoffrey Beene Global Neurodiscovery Challenge
The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, in association with the Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’s Initiative, announce preliminary winner, finalist for the awards, and open voting to the public.+Alzheimer's Reading Room Online Voting begins on November 1  and ends of November 5From November 1 – 5, 2013 the public will have the opportunity to vote for the grand prize winning entry. Click the image above for details.
http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2013/10/the-2013-geoffr


NEWS - What We Can Learn From the Girl Who Never Grew Up
Younger siblings often outgrow their older brothers and sisters, but for Brooke Greenberg of Baltimore, the difference in development between her and her siblings was startling. Greenberg passed away last Thursday at the young age of 20, still looking like a toddler. Developmentally, she stalled at the age of 5, never weighing more than 17 lb. (7.7 kg). Her condition, which she shares with a handful of other people around the world and which kept ...
http://healthland.time.com/2013/10/30/what-we-can-learn-from


NEWS-CANCER - After thyroid cancer, measuring segments of genetic material may help predict and monitor recurrence
A new analysis has found that the presence of short segments of genetic material (known as microRNA) within papillary thyroid cancer tumors suggests a likelihood of recurrence after patients undergo surgery. The study, which is published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, also found that elevated blood levels of the genetic material after surgery may indicate a higher possibility of recurrence after th
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268045.ph


NEWS-CANCER - Lipid secreted by tumors acts like 'invisibility cloak'
Researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered how a lipid secreted by cancer tumors prevents the immune system from mounting an immune response against it. When lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) binds to killer T cells, it acts almost like an "invisibility cloak," preventing T cells from recognizing and attacking nascent tumors.. ..
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268038.ph


NEWS-CANCER - Qigong can help fight fatigue in prostate cancer survivors
The flowing movements and meditative exercises of the mind-body activity Qigong may help survivors of prostate cancer to combat fatigue. These are the findings of a trial study led by Dr. Anita Y. Kinney at the University of New Mexico Cancer Center and Dr. Rebecca Campo at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The study took place at the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, and was published in Springer's Journal of Ca ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-qigong-fatigue-prostat


NEWS-CANCER - Researchers discover novel mechanism of tumor cell invasion in melanoma
(Medical Xpress)—The most devastating feature of cancer is that it often spreads throughout the human body and forms secondary tumors also known as metastases. One of the most aggressive metastatic cancers with no currently available curative therapy is melanoma, a type of skin cancer that originates from melanocytes, cells that normally make skin tan. Lifetime risk and mortality rates of metastatic melanoma have been steadily increasing for
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-mechanism-tumor-cell-i


NEWS-CANCER - Sedentary behavior linked to recurrence of precancerous colorectal tumors
Men who spend the most time engaged in sedentary behaviors are at greatest risk for recurrence of colorectal adenomas, benign tumors that are known precursors of colorectal cancers. Although there is extensive evidence supporting an association between higher overall levels of physical activity and reduced risk of colorectal cancer, few studies have focused on the impact of sedentary behavior on colorectal cancer risk ..
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029143002.ht


NEWS-CANCER - Weight at time of diagnosis linked to prostate cancer mortality
Men who are overweight or obese when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer are more likely to die from the disease than men who are of healthy weight, according to a study ..
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029143004.ht


PAIN - Research finds pain in infancy alters response to stress, anxiety later in life
(Medical Xpress)—Early life pain alters neural circuits in the brain that regulate stress, suggesting pain experienced by infants who often do not receive analgesics while undergoing tests and treatment in neonatal intensive care may permanently alter future responses to anxiety, stress and pain in adulthood, a research team led by Dr. Anne Murphy, associate director of the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University, has discovered ..
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-pain-infancy-response-


PSYCHOLOGY - Institute explores intimate partner violence across generations
Most parents who experienced intimate partner violence had children that grew to face violence in their own adult relationships, according to a study published by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University ..
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-explores-intimate-part


PSYCHOLOGY - Moral in the morning, but dishonest in the afternoon
Our ability to exhibit self-control to avoid cheating or lying is significantly reduced over the course of a day, making us more likely to be dishonest in the afternoon than in the morning, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-moral-morning-dishones


PSYCHOLOGY - Study finds money encourages patients with severe mental illness to take their medication regularly
(Medical Xpress)—New research led by Queen Mary University of London reveals offering modest financial incentives to patients with psychotic disorders is an effective method for improving adherence to antipsychotic treatment ..
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-money-patients-severe-


WEIGHT - In search of the best diet in terms of health and body weight
The Nutrition and Obesity Research Group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country is studying the effects of diet composition on people's body weight and health. Its participation in the PREDIMED project features among the many pieces of research it has conducted. The project has enabled the group to show that the effect of the Mediterranean diet on the cardiovascular system is even greater than that of a low-fat diet. The group is now
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-diet-terms-health-body


WEIGHT - Obesity: A new appetite-increasing mechanism discovered
Despite their efforts, many morbidly obese people continue to consume too much food (hyperphagia) compared to their reserves and their needs. And yet, the hunger hormone, called ghrelin, is most frequently found at a normal or even lower level in these patients. Research can now explain this mechanism causing this paradoxical hyperphagia. Certain antibodies have a greater affinity for ghrelin in obese patients, leading to extended appetite
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029133753.ht


WEIGHT - The 4 Billion-Year-Old Story of Obesity
In light of the upcoming celebration of ghosts, ghouls, and of course, the stomach ache-inducing over-consumption of candy, I thought I’d revisit this piece I started earlier this year. And if...--
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/food-matters/2013/10/30/


ALZHEIMER - High blood sugar makes Alzheimer’s plaque more toxic to the brain

High blood-sugar levels, such as those linked with Type 2 diabetes, make beta amyloid protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease dramatically more toxic to cells lining blood vessels in the brain, according to a new study ...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029090345.ht

ALZHEIMER - New Batch of Alzheimer's Genes Discovered


http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=174835

BRAIN - 'Ancient brain' helps us interpret edges

Scientists from Australia believe they have found the brain cells that recognize patterns. And, surprisingly, they were not in the "modern" part of the brain, but in the thalamus, or "ancient" brain. The findings, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, throw new light on how our brains interpret shapes, particularly edges. "Our vision cells respond to different information - some to color, some to brightness, and now we've found the ones that ...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268116.ph

BRAIN - A therapeutic hypothesis for glucose intolerance after cerebral ischemia

Interestingly, a recent study found that ischemic stress causes hyperglycemia and may worsen ischemic neuronal damage. In addition, decreased insulin sensitivity after ischemic stress seems to be involved in the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance. However, the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the development of glucose intolerance following ischemic stress still remains unclear ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-therapeutic-hypothesis-glucose-i

BRAIN - How poverty molds the brain


Groundbreaking research nearly two decades ago linking a mother's educational background to her children's literacy and cognitive abilities stands out among decades of social science studies demonstrating the adverse effects of poverty. Now new research has taken that finding in a neuroscientific direction: linking poor processing of auditory information in the adolescent brain to a lower maternal educational background
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029171836.ht