HEALTH PORTATION curated News November 29th

ALZHEIMER - Blood pressure drugs shown to decrease risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia
A Johns Hopkins-led analysis of data previously gathered on more than 3,000 elderly Americans strongly suggests that taking certain blood pressure medications to control blood pressure may reduce the risk of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD)
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-blood-pressure-drugs-s


ALZHEIMER - Early Warning: Detecting Alzheimer’s in the Blood and Brain Before Memory Loss
Alzheimer’s doesn’t happen suddenly, but scientists are still struggling to find the best ways of capturing the first signs of trouble. In two separate studies, researchers report some success in looking for telltale markers in the blood and spinal fluid that could signal the beginning of Alzheimer’s. MORE: Genetic Markers May Predict Increased Risk of Alzheimer’s In one report published in the journal Neurology, scientists studied cerebrospinal ...
http://healthland.time.com/2013/10/16/early-warning-detectin


ALZHEIMER - How diabetes predisposes individuals to Alzheimer's disease
Diabetes and dementia are rising dramatically in the United States and worldwide. In the last few years, epidemiological data has accrued showing that older people with diabetes are significantly more likely to develop cognitive deterioration and increased susceptibility to onset of dementia related to Alzheimer's disease.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/267855.ph


BRAIN - Differences revealed in brains of preterm infants
Premature birth appears to trigger developmental processes in the white matter of the brain that could put children at higher risk of problems later in life, according to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).Preterm infants - generally those born 23 to 36 weeks after conception, as opposed to the normal 37- to 42-week gestation - face an increased risk of behavioral problems,
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/269418.ph


BRAIN - Locusts provide clues to how the brain processes smells
Our sense of smell is often the first response to environmental stimuli. Odors trigger neurons in the brain that alert us to take action. However, there is often more than one odor in the environment, such as in coffee shops or grocery stores. How does our brain process multiple odors received simultaneously?Barani Raman, PhD, of the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, set out to find an answer .. ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/269408.ph


BRAIN - Memories 'geotagged' with spatial information
Using a video game in which people navigate through a town delivering objects, a team of neuroscientists has discovered how brain cells that encode spatial information form "geotags" for specific memories and are activated immediately before those memories are recalled. Their work shows how spatial information is incorporated into memories and why remembering an experience can bring to mind other events that happened in the same place .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131128141405.ht


BRAIN - Researchers find gene responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder
A study published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience points, for the first time, to the gene trkC as a factor in susceptibility to the disease. The researchers define the specific mechanism for the formation of fear memories which will help in the development of new pharmacological and cognitive treatments .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-gene-responsible-susce


BRAIN - Researchers find gene responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder
A study published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience points, for the first time, to the gene trkC as a factor in susceptibility to the disease. The researchers define the specific mechanism for the formation of fear memories which will help in the development of new pharmacological and cognitive treatments .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-gene-responsible-susce


BRAIN - Scientists explore memories, true and false
(Medical Xpress)—Not all memories are good and some might be so bad that they are debilitating; successful ways of coping with bad memories are to transform them into learning experiences and to derive strength from adversity. Another human reaction is to allow the memories to block the ability to move forward. In short, dwelling on rather than learning from the past is not a good thing. For some people who suffer trauma, though, moving forward ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-scientists-explore-mem


BRAIN - The pauses that refresh the memory
Sufferers of schizophrenia experience a broad gamut of symptoms, including hallucinations and delusions as well as disorientation and problems with learning and memory. This diversity of neurological deficits has made schizophrenia extremely difficult for scientists to understand, thwarting the development of effective treatments. A research team led by Susumu Tonegawa from the RIKEN–MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics has now revealed disrupt ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-refresh-memory.htm


BRAIN - A family affair: brain abnormalities in siblings of patients with schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that has a strong genetic basis. Converging evidence suggests that schizophrenia is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder, with earlier onset cases resulting in more profound brain abnormalities. Siblings of patients with schizophrenia provide an invaluable resource for differentiating between trait and state markers, thus highlighting possible endophenotypes for ongoing research. However, findings
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/136/11/3215.short?rs


BRAIN - Circular inferences in schizophrenia
A considerable number of recent experimental and computational studies suggest that subtle impairments of excitatory to inhibitory balance or regulation are involved in many neurological and psychiatric conditions. The current paper aims to relate, specifically and quantitatively, excitatory to inhibitory imbalance with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Considering that the brain constructs hierarchical causal models of the external world,
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/136/11/3227.short?rs


BRAIN - First-graders with attention problems lag for years afterward; second-graders, less so
When it comes to children's attention problems, the difference between first and second grade is profound, says a new study from Duke University. The study, which was recently published online in the Journal of Attention Disorders, says the age at which attention problems emerge makes a critical difference in a child's later academic performance.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/267795.ph


BRAIN - Midbrain dopamine function in schizophrenia and depression: a post-mortem and positron emission tomographic imaging study
Elevated in vivo markers of presynaptic striatal dopamine activity have been a consistent finding in schizophrenia, and include a large effect size elevation in dopamine synthesis capacity. However, it is not known if the dopaminergic dysfunction is limited to the striatal terminals of dopamine neurons, or is also evident in the dopamine neuron cell bodies, which mostly originate in the substantia nigra. The aim of our studies was therefore to
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/136/11/3242.short?rs


BRAIN - Subthalamic stimulation modulates self-estimation of patients with Parkinson's disease and induces risk-seeking behaviour
Patients with Parkinson’s disease with deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus postoperatively often display higher impulsivity and therefore may experience difficulties in social interactions. Here, we examined social interactions of patients with Parkinson’s disease with and without deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus in competitive situations. We hypothesized altered self-estimation and risk-seeking behaviour in this
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/136/11/3271.short?rs


BRAIN - Undirected compensatory plasticity contributes to neuronal dysfunction after severe spinal cord injury
Severe spinal cord injury in humans leads to a progressive neuronal dysfunction in the chronic stage of the injury. This dysfunction is characterized by premature exhaustion of muscle activity during assisted locomotion, which is associated with the emergence of abnormal reflex responses. Here, we hypothesize that undirected compensatory plasticity within neural systems caudal to a severe spinal cord injury contributes to the development of neuro
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/136/11/3347.short?rs


BRAIN - What determines which sources within an episode are successfully remembered?
Memory about a core item (such as a word, object, or picture) is called item memory while memory about the context or related features of a core item is defined as source memory. What determines which sources within an episode are successfully remembered is of particular interest to researchers. Behavioral evidence suggests that the orientation of a memory task influences whether the related source of the item will be remembered later .
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-sources-episode-succes


COOK - Eat Your Broccoli
Five ways to prepare broccoli, with cooking and without, to benefit from its many nutrients .. ...
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/25/eat-your-broccoli


DIABETES - Mediterranean diet without breakfast the best choice for diabetics, new study says
For patients with diabetes, it is better to eat a single large meal than several smaller meals throughout the day. This is the result of a current dietary study at Linköping University in Sweden
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-mediterranean-diet-bre


EXERCISE - Mobility explains the association between social activity and mortality risk in older people
Social activity and health correlate in old age, but less is known about what explains this association. The results of a study carried out in the Gerontology Research Center showed that part of the association between social activity and mortality was mediated by mobility among older men and women. Of other potential mediators, having less depressive symptoms and better cognitive functioning are merely prerequisites for social activity .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-mobility-association-s


EXERCISE - Staying active all day linked to healthy aging
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A generally active life, even without regular exercise sessions, was tied to better heart health and greater longevity in a study of older Swedes .. ...
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/29/us-staying-active-


FOODS - Food fight or exercise attack?
Experts offer two ways to battle the holiday bulge
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131129101607.ht


FOODS - Party Like It's 1799: Traditional Cider Makes A Comeback
Cider is still a small part of the overall alcohol market. But it's growing faster than any other category. And not just the hot mulled stuff that steams up your kitchen. This cider is more like sparkling wine. And some is made with the same apple varieties, and in the same style, as the cider bottled by Thomas Jefferson.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.u .. ...
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/11/29/247527939/party-


FOODS - The Best Buffalo Wings in America
From a lunch counter in Brooklyn manned by two guys from Buffalo to a sports bar in Little Rock that smokes their wings for four hours before frying, there's no shortage of places to find great Buffalo wings in the U.S. When chicken wings hit the deep fryer, something magical happens. What was once a flabby, borderline useless part of the chicken that was most commonly used for stock suddenly becomes a crispy, juicy snack that's perfectly good wi ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-daily-meal/the-best-buffal


FOODS - Thrillist: Important Seinfeld Foods That Won't Make You Thirsty
Here're some of the most memorable foods from Seinfeld, excluding those salty, salty pretzels.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thrillist/seinfeld-foods_b_414


LONGEVITY - DNews: Humans Can Be Dated Like Trees
Like rings on a tree, human flesh can be dated in a consistent, reliable way. And, as Trace tells us, this discovery could revolutionize medicine and even enable us to extend life
http://news.discovery.com/human/videos/humans-can-be-dated-l


HEART - The heart's own stem cells play their part in regeneration
(Medical Xpress)—Up until a few years ago, the common school of thought held that the mammalian heart had very little regenerative capacity. However, scientists now know that heart muscle cells constantly regenerate, albeit at a very low rate. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim, have identified a stem cell population responsible for this regeneration. Hopes are growing that it will be possible in
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-heart-stem-cells-regen


NEWS - Malaria vaccine offers new mode of protection against disease
(Medical Xpress)—A novel malaria vaccine developed at Oxford University has shown promising results in the first clinical trial to test whether it can protect people against the mosquito-borne disease
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-malaria-vaccine-mode-d


NEWS - Mitochondria separate their waste
In order to protect themselves from harmful substances, cells need to keep the mitochondria - the boiler room, so to speak - shipshape. Up to now, it was unclear whether this housekeeping work involves sorting out defective proteins when they digest mitochondria. Dr. Jörn Dengjel from the Center for Biological Systems Analysis (ZBSA), Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), and the Cluster of Excellence BIOSS Centre for Biological Signal
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-mitochondria.htm


NEWS - Scientists find mystery virus in camels in Qatar
Health officials say they have found a mysterious respiratory virus in a herd of camels in Qatar linked to two human cases of the disease .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-scientists-mystery-vir


NEWS - Sweden divided over criminalising HIV unprotected sex
When Lina Afvander got her HIV diagnosis, it came with a set of prescriptions and a disclosure obligation, which legally requires HIV-positive people in Sweden to reveal their status before having sex
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-sweden-criminalising-h


NEWS - Tongue piercing-controlled wheelchair performs 'three times better'
A new device shows that tongue piercings can be more than just an expression of one's style. They can also help those who have lost the use of their arms and legs move. In a recent clinical trial, the device, called the Tongue Drive System, performed much better than the most widely used system.The study, which was led by Associate Professor Maysam Ghovanloo, from the Georgia Institute of Technology, was recently published in the journal Science ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/269526.ph


NEWS - What Is Plantar Fasciitis?
Scientific American presents House Call Doctor by Quick & Dirty Tips . Scientific American and Quick & Dirty Tips are both Macmillan companies.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=what-is-pla


NEWS - Expert panel issues recommendations for 'Dyspnea Crisis'
An American Thoracic Society panel of experts is calling for better care for thousands of Americans who suffer severe shortness of breath as a result of advanced lung and heart disease. These episodes can be very frightening for patients and caregivers, and the increased anxiety often makes the symptoms worse. In the current issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society, the panel suggests that patients work with their providers to develop ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-expert-panel-issues-dy


NEWS - Face-Shape Secrets May Lie in 'Junk' DNA
Face shape is largely determined by genetics, yet no two faces are entirely alike
http://news.discovery.com/human/evolution/face-shape-secrets


NEWS - Microbial 'signature' discovered in oral bacteria that can discriminate between ethnicities
The bacteria in the human mouth - particularly those nestled under the gums - are as powerful as a fingerprint at identifying a person's ethnicity, new research shows. Scientists identified a total of almost 400 different species of microbes in the mouths of 100 study participants belonging to four ethnic affiliations: non-Hispanic blacks, whites, Chinese and Latinos
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/267845.ph


NEWS - New methods to trace fragrance allergens
A recent doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg presents new methods to trace allergenic fragrance compounds in consumer products, such as perfumes
http://phys.org/news/2013-10-methods-fragrance-allergens.htm


NEWS - Scientists discover tool to understand nerve cells
(Medical Xpress)—A team of international scientists is one step closer to understanding neurodegenerative diseases after developing a tool to explore how nerve cells become damaged
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-scientists-tool-nerve-


NEWS - Scorpion venom is a painkiller for the grasshopper mouse | Mo Costandi
Researchers have identified the molecular mechanisms that make the grasshopper mouse resistant to scorpion venomThe bark scorpion is, according to Wikipedia, the most venomous scorpion in North America, wielding an intensely painful – and potentially lethal – sting that stuns and deters snakes, birds and other predators. People unfortunate enough to have experienced the sting say that it produces an immediate burning sensation, followed by prolon ...
http://www.theguardian.com/science/neurophilosophy/2013/oct/


NEWS-CANCER - Brain cancer 'diagnosed in 30 minutes' with new test
Brain cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in the US population. Current methods can diagnose the cancer within 2 to 3 days, but researchers say they have created a new technique in which the disease could be diagnosed in just half an hour.Brain cancer is defined as one or more cancerous tumors within the brain or central spine canal. The cancer can develop at any age, but the risk increases as a person gets older.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/269434.ph


NEWS-CANCER - EORTC Cancer in the Elderly Task Force: appropriate treatment for elderly patients with cancer
As we age, we experience a progressive decline in many of our bodily functions. This decline can vary greatly from individual to individual. One 75 year old might still be very active and participate in strenuous physical activities, while another might require considerable assistance just to perform simple everyday tasks. Aging is variable. It is a highly individualized process that is influenced by a number of genetic, developmental
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/269406.ph


NEWS-CANCER - High-fat diets in puberty linked to breast cancer
Young women approaching puberty could reduce their risk of breast cancer if they avoid high-fat diets, researchers from Michigan State University claim.The research, published in the current online issue of Breast Cancer Research, suggests that eating a diet high in saturated animal fats not only speeds up the development of breast cancer, but also may increase the risk of developing the disease .. ...
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/269441.ph


NEWS-CANCER - Urine test could help detect aggressive bladder cancer
A simple urine test could distinguish between aggressive and less aggressive bladder cancers according to a new Cancer Research UK study published in the British Journal of Cancer
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-urine-aggressive-bladd


PARKINSONS - Genetic mutation increases risk of Parkinson's disease from pesticides
A team of researchers has brought new clarity to the picture of how gene-environmental interactions can kill nerve cells that make dopamine. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that sends messages to the part of the brain that controls movement and coordination. Their discoveries, described in a paper published online in Cell today, include identification of a molecule that protects neurons from pesticide damage
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-genetic-mutation-parki


PSYCHOLOGY - Portion size influenced by personality traits
As dish size increases, so do portion size and the amount of food actually eaten - but could personality traits play a role in how susceptible people are to this plate-size bias? New research by the Cornell Food and Brand Lab indicates that extraverted and introverted children respond differently to environmental cues, such as plate size, when it comes to portion control.Researchers examined the breakfast behaviors of kids, ages 6 to 10, in
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/269410.ph


PSYCHOLOGY - Study reveals gender differences in sexual regret
In the largest, most in-depth study to date on regret surrounding sexual activity, a team of psychology researchers found a stark contrast in remorse between men and women, potentially shedding light on the evolutionary history of human nature.Researchers for the peer-reviewed study included University of Texas at Austin evolutionary psychologist David Buss. The study was led by Andrew Galperin, a former social psychology doctoral student
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/269409.ph


PSYCHOLOGY - Kids are more likely to trust attractive adults
Children are more likely to trust an adult with an attractive face compared to an unattractive one -- this is the finding of new research .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131024220918.ht


PSYCHOLOGY - Older volunteers in better physical health than younger peers
Adults 70 or older who regularly volunteer are in better physical health than those just a few years younger, according to new research from Purdue University .
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-older-volunteers-physi


WEIGHT - Young obese women could reduce their stroke risk
Sophia Antipolis, 29 October 2013: The global campaign to tackle stroke is highlighted today on World Stroke Day with the slogan "Because I care…". The phrase showcases the role of caregivers in supporting people who have suffered a stroke and aims to correct misinformation about the disease, such as the misconception that stroke only happens later in life
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-young-obese-women.htm


ALZHEIMER - Blood pressure drugs shown to decrease risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia

A Johns Hopkins-led analysis of data previously gathered on more than 3,000 elderly Americans strongly suggests that taking certain blood pressure medications to control blood pressure may reduce the risk of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-blood-pressure-drugs-shown-decre

ALZHEIMER - Early Warning: Detecting Alzheimer’s in the Blood and Brain Before Memory Loss

Alzheimer’s doesn’t happen suddenly, but scientists are still struggling to find the best ways of capturing the first signs of trouble. In two separate studies, researchers report some success in looking for telltale markers in the blood and spinal fluid that could signal the beginning of Alzheimer’s. MORE: Genetic Markers May Predict Increased Risk of Alzheimer’s In one report published in the journal Neurology, scientists studied cerebrospinal ...

http://healthland.time.com/2013/10/16/early-warning-detecting-alzheime

ALZHEIMER - How diabetes predisposes individuals to Alzheimer's disease

Diabetes and dementia are rising dramatically in the United States and worldwide. In the last few years, epidemiological data has accrued showing that older people with diabetes are significantly more likely to develop cognitive deterioration and increased susceptibility to onset of dementia related to Alzheimer's disease.. ...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/267855.ph

BRAIN - Differences revealed in brains of preterm infants

Premature birth appears to trigger developmental processes in the white matter of the brain that could put children at higher risk of problems later in life, according to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).Preterm infants - generally those born 23 to 36 weeks after conception, as opposed to the normal 37- to 42-week gestation - face an increased risk of behavioral problems, ...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/269418.ph

BRAIN - Locusts provide clues to how the brain processes smells

Our sense of smell is often the first response to environmental stimuli. Odors trigger neurons in the brain that alert us to take action. However, there is often more than one odor in the environment, such as in coffee shops or grocery stores. How does our brain process multiple odors received simultaneously?Barani Raman, PhD, of the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, set out to find an answer ...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/269408.ph

BRAIN - Memories 'geotagged' with spatial information

Using a video game in which people navigate through a town delivering objects, a team of neuroscientists has discovered how brain cells that encode spatial information form "geotags" for specific memories and are activated immediately before those memories are recalled. Their work shows how spatial information is incorporated into memories and why remembering an experience can bring to mind other events that happened in the same place ...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131128141405.ht

BRAIN - Researchers find gene responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder

A study published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience points, for the first time, to the gene trkC as a factor in susceptibility to the disease. The researchers define the specific mechanism for the formation of fear memories which will help in the development of new pharmacological and cognitive treatments ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-gene-responsible-susceptibility-

BRAIN - Researchers find gene responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder

A study published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience points, for the first time, to the gene trkC as a factor in susceptibility to the disease. The researchers define the specific mechanism for the formation of fear memories which will help in the development of new pharmacological and cognitive treatments ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-gene-responsible-susceptibility-

BRAIN - Scientists explore memories, true and false

(Medical Xpress)—Not all memories are good and some might be so bad that they are debilitating; successful ways of coping with bad memories are to transform them into learning experiences and to derive strength from adversity. Another human reaction is to allow the memories to block the ability to move forward. In short, dwelling on rather than learning from the past is not a good thing. For some people who suffer trauma, though, moving forward ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-scientists-explore-memories-true

BRAIN - The pauses that refresh the memory

Sufferers of schizophrenia experience a broad gamut of symptoms, including hallucinations and delusions as well as disorientation and problems with learning and memory. This diversity of neurological deficits has made schizophrenia extremely difficult for scientists to understand, thwarting the development of effective treatments. A research team led by Susumu Tonegawa from the RIKEN–MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics has now revealed disrupt ...

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-refresh-memory.htm

BRAIN - A family affair: brain abnormalities in siblings of patients with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that has a strong genetic basis. Converging evidence suggests that schizophrenia is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder, with earlier onset cases resulting in more profound brain abnormalities. Siblings of patients with schizophrenia provide an invaluable resource for differentiating between trait and state markers, thus highlighting possible endophenotypes for ongoing research. However, findings fr ...

http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/136/11/3215.short?rss=

BRAIN - Circular inferences in schizophrenia

A considerable number of recent experimental and computational studies suggest that subtle impairments of excitatory to inhibitory balance or regulation are involved in many neurological and psychiatric conditions. The current paper aims to relate, specifically and quantitatively, excitatory to inhibitory imbalance with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Considering that the brain constructs hierarchical causal models of the external world, we ...

http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/136/11/3227.short?rss=

BRAIN - First-graders with attention problems lag for years afterward; second-graders, less so

When it comes to children's attention problems, the difference between first and second grade is profound, says a new study from Duke University. The study, which was recently published online in the Journal of Attention Disorders, says the age at which attention problems emerge makes a critical difference in a child's later academic performance.. ...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/267795.ph