HEALTH PORTATION curated News March 17th

ALZHEIMER - Development of Alzheimer's trademark cell-killing plaques slowed by researchers
Researchers have learned how to fix a cellular structure called the Golgi that mysteriously becomes fragmented in all Alzheimer's patients and appears to be a major cause of the disease. They say that understanding this mechanism helps decode amyloid plaque formation in the brains of Alzheimer's patients -- plaques that kills cells and contributes to memory loss and other Alzheimer's symptoms .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317155158.ht


ALZHEIMER - How age opens the gates for Alzheimer’s
With advancing age, highly-evolved brain circuits become susceptible to molecular changes that can lead to neurofibrillary tangles — a hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease, Yale researchers report the week of March 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .. ...
http://news.yale.edu/2014/03/17/how-age-opens-gates-alzheime


ALZHEIMER - New therapeutic target discovered for Alzheimer's disease
A team of scientists report that cathepsin B gene knockout or its reduction by an enzyme inhibitor blocks creation of key neurotoxic pGlu-Abeta peptides linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, the candidate inhibitor drug has been shown to be safe in humans .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317155207.ht


ALZHEIMER - Scientists slow development of Alzheimer's trademark cell-killing plaques
University of Michigan researchers have learned how to fix a cellular structure called the Golgi that mysteriously becomes fragmented in all Alzheimer's patients and appears to be a major cause of the disease .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-scientists-alzheimer-t


BRAIN - Too Many Unneeded Brain Scans for Headaches, Study Suggests
Routine use of imaging tests not recommended, but more docs ordering them anyway, researcher say .. ...
Findings may aid development of lung
http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/news/20140317/too-m


COOK - How To Scramble An Egg Without Breaking The Shell
How To Scramble An Egg In The Shell, Without Breaking The Shell If you like scrambled egg, then you have to try this. In Japan it’s called a Golden Egg. As you can see in this short video, this is a very easy process and you just need one leg cut from a pair of […]The post How To Scramble An Egg Without Breaking The Shell appeared first on PositiveMed .. ...
http://positivemed.com/2014/03/17/scramble-egg-without-break


DIABETES - Can testosterone shots prevent diabetes in men?
University of Sydney researchers are seeking male participants for a novel trial assessing whether regular testosterone shots can prevent type 2 diabetes in men .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-testosterone-shots-dia


DIABETES - How the science of deer hunting can help patients with diabetes
Body odor is a deer hunter’s worst enemy, an alert to animals that an ominous presence is lurking, but the science behind suppressing it to give hunters an edge oddly enough could help researchers develop a life-saving device for diabetes patients. Scientists have now presented the latest advances that tie together these two seemingly unrelated fronts .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317103512.ht


EXERCISE - Researchers stress weight-bearing exercise for bone strength
When Denise Allee went shopping at Terre Haute's Honey Creek Mall on a recent Saturday, she left with some piece of mind .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-stress-weight-bearing-


FOODS - 10 facts about the changing fast food industry
There is no question that dieting and healthy eating has become a greater topic of conversation in recent years and the fast food industry has taken notice. Eighty-seven percent of fast food operators say their customers are paying more attention to nutrition than they were two years ago (National Restaurant Association) .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-facts-fast-food-indust


FOODS - Better-tasting reduced-fat desserts, dressings, sauces: Coming soon?
Adjusting the calcium level and acidity could be the key to developing new better tasting, more eye-appealing and creamier reduced-fat sauces, desserts and salad dressings, researchers report .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140316152949.ht


FOODS - Knowing whether food has spoiled without even opening the container
A color-coded smart tag could tell consumers whether milk has turned sour or green beans have spoiled without opening the containers, say researchers. The tag, appearing on the packaging, also could be used to determine if medications and other perishable products were still active or fresh .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317170638.ht


HEART - Chocolate: Scrumdidilyumptious For The Heart?
If the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and chocolate-maker Mars have anything to do with it, Willy Wonka may be leaving Charlie more than the famous Everlasting Gobstopper. The government research group and maker of M&Ms and Snickers have teamed in the largest study ever to find out more about health benefits of cocoa [&hellipChocolate: Scrumdidilyumptious For The Heart? was originally posted on: PlanetSave. To read more from Pl ...
http://planetsave.com/2014/03/17/chocolate-scrumdidilyumptio


HEART - Heart cells respond to stiff environments
Proteins associated with the regulation of organ size and shape have been found to respond to the mechanics of the microenvironment in ways that specifically affect the decision of adult cardiac stem cells to generate muscular or vascular cells .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140316132738.ht


HEART - New evidence raises questions about the link between fatty acids and heart disease
A new study raises questions about current guidelines which generally restrict the consumption of saturated fats and encourage consumption of polyunsaturated fats to prevent heart disease. The research was published today, 18 March, in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-evidence-link-fatty-ac


HEART - New reason to eat oats for heart health
Eleven top scientists from around the globe presented the latest findings on the powerful compounds found in oats in a scientific session titled, Physicochemical Properties and Biological Functionality of Oats, at the 247th Annual Conference of the American Chemical Society in Dallas, TX. Scientists described research on the diverse health benefits of oats and emphasized the growing evidence that the type of phenolic compound avenanthramide (AVE) ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-oats-heart-health.htm


HEART - New system aids cardiovascular risk diagnosis
Researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València, the Hospital General de Valencia and the Ophthalmology Unit of the Foundation for the Health and Biomedical Research of the Comunitat Valenciana (FISABIO-Oftalmología Médica) have developed a new software to aid cardiovascular risk diagnosis based on fundus image processing. The Paediatrics Unit of the Hospital General de Valencia has incorporated  this software in a study of cardiovascula ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-aids-cardiovascular-di


HEART - Quest to uncover early signs of cardiovascular disease
A new study is hoping to reveal the early signs of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in order to create drugs to treat the condition before symptoms have developed .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-quest-uncover-early-ca


HEART - Second artificial heart implant due in 'weeks'
After its first recipient died, French biomedical firm Carmat said on Monday it expected to try again to implant its experimental artificial heart in another patient "in several weeks" .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-artificial-heart-impla


HEART - Study to test 'chocolate' pills for heart health
It won't be nearly as much fun as eating candy bars, but a big study is being launched to see if pills containing the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-chocolate-pills-heart-


HEART - Women Face Delays in Heart Attack Care Compared to Men: Study
Researchers found female patients under 55 waiting longer than males for ECGs, clot-busting drug .. ...
It's a complex, system-wide problem, expert says.
http://www.webmd.com/women/news/20140317/women-face-delays-i


IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Fast-moving cells in human immune system walk in stepwise manner
Advanced mathematical tools were applied to answer a basic question in cell biology about how cells move and discovered that the mechanism looks very similar to walking, a team of biologists and engineers reports. Their discovery is an important advance toward developing new pharmacological strategies to treat chronic inflammatory diseases .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317095943.ht


IMMUNE-SYSTEM - Study finds that fast-moving cells in the human immune system walk in a stepwise manner
A team of biologists and engineers at the University of California, San Diego has discovered that white blood cells, which repair damaged tissue as part of the body's immune response, move to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner. The cells periodically form and break adhesions mainly under two "feet," and generate the traction forces that propel them forward by the coordinated action of contractile proteins. Their discovery, published M ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-fast-moving-cells-huma


NEWS - Breaking new ground: Yale team implants human innate immune cells in mice
Overcoming a major limitation to the study of the origins and progress of human disease, Yale researchers report that they have transplanted human innate immune cells into mouse models, which resulted in human immune responses. This groundbreaking study has reproduced human immune function at a level not seen previously, and could significantly improve the translation of knowledge gained from mouse studies into humans. The study is published onli ...
http://news.yale.edu/2014/03/17/breaking-new-ground-yale-tea


NEWS - China halves tuberculosis prevalence in just 20 years
Over the last 20 years, China has more than halved its tuberculosis (TB) prevalence, with rates falling from 170 to 59 per 100 000 population. This unrivalled success has been driven by a massive scale-up of the directly observed, short-course (DOTS) strategy, from half the population in the 1990s to the entire country after 2000, according to findings from a 20-year-long analysis of national survey data, published in The Lancet .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-china-halves-tuberculo


NEWS - Fighting antibiotic resistance with 'molecular drill bits'
In response to drug-resistant “superbugs” that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, “molecular drill bits” that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. Researchers have presented some of the latest developments on these drill bits, better known to scientists as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317124931.ht


NEWS - Honey offers new approach to fighting antibiotic resistance
Honey, that delectable condiment for breads and fruits, could be one sweet solution to the serious, ever-growing problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, researchers say. In addition, several studies have shown that honey inhibits the formation of biofilms, or communities of slimy disease-causing bacteria .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140316132801.ht


NEWS - New research links body clocks to chronic lung diseases
(Medical Xpress)—The body clock's natural rhythm could be utilized to improve current therapies to delay the onset of chronic lung diseases .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-links-body-clocks-chro


NEWS - Pathways that direct immune system to turn 'on' or 'off' found
Manipulating the CD80/CD86 pathway may yield new strategies for treating multiple myeloma, new research on dendritic cells suggests. This research focused on the immune system’s dendritic cells (DCs), crucial cells that initiate and regulate immune responses. For example, the dendritic cells activate T lymphocytes to fight an infection or cancer. Curiously, they are also known to suppress the immune response. Determining when DCs turn the immune ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317124952.ht


NEWS - Patient’s Face Reconstructed Using 3D-Printed Parts
Stephen Power, a 29-year-old Welsh man who was badly injured in a 2012 motorcycle crash, underwent major reconstructive surgery on his face and now wears custom-made 3D-printed structural implants that were devised and installed using 3D-printed models of his facial bones.3D-printed implants are still cutting-edge, but they have been used successfully a number of times. What makes Power’s case different is that the doctors also printed models
http://singularityhub.com/2014/03/17/patients-face-reconstru


NEWS - Research in the News: Spending more does not necessarily mean better results for heart health
Chest pain is one of the most common reasons for emergency room visits. But once patients arrive, clinicians have wide discretion in determining which tests are needed to evaluate the patients’ heart health. A recent study in JAMA Internal Medicine from Yale School of Medicine evaluates the variation in clinica .. ...
http://news.yale.edu/2014/03/17/research-news-spending-more-


NEWS - Risk factors for little-known lung infection identified
Severe and sometimes fatal lung disease caused by a group of bacteria in the same family as those that cause tuberculosis is much more common than previously thought, with Caucasians 55 and older at greatest risk, report researchers. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) include more than 150 types of bacteria that can infect the lungs when inhaled. Unlike tuberculosis, NTM is not contagious and cannot spread from person to person. The infection is t ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317103515.ht


NEWS - Taking immune cells for a test drive
You're on a crowded subway car and someone nearby sneezes. Influenza viruses shed by your fellow rider are expelled in droplets of saliva that land on you and the person next to you. Two days later, you begin suffering from the classic flu symptoms of fever, aches, and runny nose, while the lucky rider next to you somehow dodges the infectious bullet .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-immune-cells.htm


NEWS - Test one's blood with the screen of a cellphone
(Phys.org) —Using the properties of a smartphone screen to perform blood tests: the device developed by Qloudlab allows at-home analysis in less than a minute. The expanded diagnostics will be used to help people undergoing anticoagulant treatment .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-03-blood-screen-cellphone.htm


NEWS - Three-quarters of people with seasonal and pandemic flu have no symptoms
Around 1 in 5 of the population were infected in both recent outbreaks of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, but just 23% of these infections caused symptoms, and only 17% of people were ill enough to consult their doctor .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-three-quarters-people-


NEWS-CANCER - 3,200-year-old skeleton found with cancer
Archaeologists have found the 3,200-year-old skeleton of a man with a spreading form of cancer, the oldest example so far of a disease often associated with modern lifestyles, scientists said Monday .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-03-year-old-skeleton-cancer.htm


NEWS-CANCER - Colon cancer incidence rates decreasing steeply in older Americans
Colon cancer incidence rates have dropped 30 percent in the U.S. in the last 10 years among adults 50 and older due to the widespread uptake of colonoscopy, with the largest decrease in people over age 65. Colonoscopy use has almost tripled among adults ages 50 to 75, from 19 percent in 2000 to 55 percent in 2010 .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-colon-cancer-incidence


NEWS-CANCER - How diabetes drugs may work against cancer
(Medical Xpress)—For several years, a class of anti-diabetic drugs known as biguanides, has been associated with anti-cancer properties. A number of retrospective studies have shown that the widely used diabetes drug metformin can benefit some cancer patients. Despite this intriguing correlation, it has been unclear how metformin might exert its anti-cancer effects and, perhaps more importantly, in which patients .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-diabetes-drugs-cancer.


NEWS-CANCER - New hope for early detection of stomach cancer
(Medical Xpress)—University of Adelaide research has provided new hope for the early detection of stomach cancer with the identification of four new biomarkers in the blood of human cancer patients .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-early-stomach-cancer.h


NEWS-CANCER - Researchers reveal how a protein common in cancers jumps anti-tumor mechanisms
A Stony Brook University-led international team of infectious disease researchers have discovered how a cellular protein, called STAT3, which is overactive in a majority of human cancers, interferes with an antitumor mechanism in cells and therefore promotes the growth of cancer. The findings, to be published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) add to the understanding of cancer development and provide a basis ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-reveal-protein-common-


PAIN - Simple Tricks for Avoiding Everyday Pain
Some pain may be caused by chronic underlying medical conditions and requires a doctor’s care. But some pain can be avoided with simple steps, like changing the way you walk or sit. Learn more here from the experts .. ...
http://www.webmd.com/women/pharmacist-11/avoiding-pain?src=R


PSYCHOLOGY - Does Self-Esteem Affect Seniors' Health?
Small study tied higher levels of stress hormone to less well-being in older adult .. ...
Danish study compared mental abilities of seniors
http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/news/20140317/does-self-e


PSYCHOLOGY - Why Is Yawning So Contagious?
About half of adults yawn after someone else yawns due to a universal phenomenon called “contagious yawning.” Researchers at Duke University have identified new factors that make yawning contagious. read mor .. ...
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201403/


SLEEP - Chronic sleep disturbance could trigger onset of Alzheimer's
People who experience chronic sleep disturbance could face an earlier onset of dementia and Alzheimer’s, results from a new pre-clinical study indicate. "We can conclude from this study that chronic sleep disturbance is an environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease," a co-author said. "But the good news is that sleep disturbances can be easily treated, which would hopefully reduce the Alzheimer's risk. .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140317155205.ht


VITAMINS - Daily Fish Oil Supplement May Not Help Your Heart: Studies
Get your omega-3s from food, not pills, experts sugges .. ...
They don't reduce the risk of heart attack, heart
http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/news/20140317/