HEALTH PORTATION curated News March 20th

ALZHEIMER - Alzheimer's strikes women harder than men, report finds
(HealthDay)—A 65-year-old American woman has a 1 in 6 chance of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life, while a man the same age has about a 1 in 11 chance .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-alzheimer-women-harder


ALZHEIMER - How age opens the gates for Alzheimer's
With advancing age, highly-evolved brain circuits become susceptible to molecular changes that can lead to neurofibrillary tangles—a hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease, Yale researchers report the week of March 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-age-gates-alzheimer.ht


BRAIN - Cholesterol Drug Might Help Slow MS Progression
Early study showed reduced brain shrinkage among multiple sclerosis patients given generic stati .. ...
Study found more short-range connections, fewer
http://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclerosis/news/20140318/choles


BRAIN - Drinking alcohol several times a week increases the risk of stroke mortality
Consuming alcohol more frequently than twice a week increases the risk of stroke mortality in men, according to a study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. The results show that the effects of alcohol are not limited to the amount consumed, but also the frequency of drinking matters. The results were published in Acta Neurologica Scandinavica on 8 March .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-alcohol-week-mortality


BRAIN - Information overload acts 'to dim the lights' on what we see
(Medical Xpress)—Too much visual information causes a phenomenon known as 'load induced blindness', with an effect akin to dimming the lights, reports a new UCL study.The new findings could be used to identify high-risk situations in all walks of life and look at ways to mitigate times of highest risk. These techniques could be used to understand everyday problems such as why you might bump into a lamppost on a busy street or even to assess the d ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-overload-dim.htm


BRAIN - Most Women Don't Know Warning Signs of Stroke: Study
Hispanic women are least likely to recognize when it is time to call 911, researchers repor .. ...
Hispanic women are least likely to recognize when
http://www.webmd.com/stroke/news/20140319/most-women-dont-kn


BRAIN - Neuroscience 'used and abused'
Influential policy-informing 'evidence' that children's brains are irreversibly 'sculpted' by parental care is based on questionable evidence .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-neuroscience-abused.ht


BRAIN - Pesticides Are Affecting Our IQs: This Is What You Can Do About It
"Grandjean estimates that there are about 45 organophosphate pesticides on the market, and 'most have the potential to damage a developing nervous system.'"Low-income families are hit the hardest. No parent can avoid these toxins—they’re in our couches and in our air. They can’t be sweated out through hot yoga classes or cleansed with a juice fast. But to whatever extent these things can be avoided without better regulations, it costs money. .. ...
http://www.good.is/posts/toxins-in-our-head


BRAIN - Research sheds light on links between memory and smell
(Medical Xpress)—Scents and smells can form the basis of some of the most significant memories that humans form in their lives .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-links-memory.htm


BRAIN - The aging brain needs REST: Research implicates new player in Alzheimer's, other dementias
Why do neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's affect only the elderly? Why do some people live to be over 100 with intact cognitive function while others develop dementia decades earlier .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-aging-brain-rest-impli


DIABETES - Diabetes in middle age may lead to brain cell loss later in life
People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ag ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-diabetes-middle-age-br


DIABETES - Diabetes researchers track cells' ability to regenerate
Vanderbilt University scientists have found evidence that the insulin-secreting beta cells of the pancreas, which are either killed or become dysfunctional in the two main forms of diabetes, have the capacity to regenerate .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-diabetes-track-cells-a


DIABETES - Researchers identify potential new therapeutic target for controlling high blood sugar
A UT Southwestern Medical Center study has identified a new potential therapeutic target for controlling high blood sugar, a finding that could help the estimated 25 million Americans with type 2 diabetes .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-potential-therapeutic-


FOODS - Brazil's new food guidelines prioritize the wellbeing of citizens over that of corporations
Unlike the U.S. food guidelines, these focus on home cooking, communal eating, and avoiding advertisements .. ...
http://www.treehugger.com/health/brazils-new-food-guidelines


FOODS - Fried foods may interact with genes to influence body weight, say experts
Individuals who are genetically predisposed to obesity may be more susceptible to the adverse effects of eating fried foods, concludes a study. The results of a new study show that eating fried food more than four times a week had twice as big an effect on body mass index (BMI) for those with the highest genetic risk scores compared with lower scores. In other words, genetic makeup can inflate the effects of bad diet .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318190027.ht


FOODS - Maps Of Countries Made From Their Regional Foods
What do you really look for when deciding on a travel destination? Historical cathedrals? Pristine beaches? Odds are food ranks high on that list. And if any help is needed, these maps illustrate exactly what kinds of regional delicacies you can expect to find around the world .. ...
http://www.good.is/posts/maps-of-countries-made-from-their-r


FOODS - Precise reason for health benefits of dark chocolate: Thank hungry gut microbes
The health benefits of eating dark chocolate have been extolled for centuries, but the exact reason has remained a mystery -- until now. Researchers reported that certain bacteria in the stomach gobble the chocolate and ferment it into anti-inflammatory compounds that are good for the heart .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318154725.ht


FOODS - Spices and herbs intervention helps adults reduce salt intake
A behavioral intervention that taught adults to use herbs and spices instead of salt led to a decrease in sodium consumption compared to people who tried to reduce sodium on their own. Adults taking part in a 20-week behavioral intervention consumed 966 mg/day less salt than their self-directed counterparts .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140319165206.ht


NEWS - 6 ways to use lemons in your beauty routine
Lemons are more than a good source of vitamin C. They're also a key ingredient in many organic beauty recipes .. ...
http://www.treehugger.com/organic-beauty/6-ways-use-lemons-y


NEWS - Can 'love hormone' oxytocin protect against addiction?
(Medical Xpress)—Researchers at the University of Adelaide say addictive behaviour such as drug and alcohol abuse could be associated with poor development of the so-called "love hormone" system in our bodies during early childhood .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-hormone-oxytocin-addic


NEWS - Comeback of an abandoned antibiotic: Trimethoprim
In less-developed countries, inexpensive and well-tolerated antibiotics for therapy of streptococcal infections are often not available. Scientists have discovered that trimethoprim may provide an option. Contrary to a long-held belief, the bacteria are not generally resistant to this agent. In their latest publication the scientists demonstrated three pathways for the development of resistance -- meaning that streptococci can easily become resis ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140319103556.ht


NEWS - Common Cold Meds May Pose Health Threats
Interaction of two ingredients could cause serious side effects, researchers sa .. ...
Researchers recommend using Advil, Motrin post-op.
http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/news/20140319/common-co


NEWS - New mechanism allowing tumor cells to escape immune surveillance discovered
The immune system plays a pivotal role in targeting cancer cells for destruction. However, tumor cells are smart and have developed ways to avoid immune detection. A collaborative team of researchers recently discovered a novel mechanism that lung cancer cells use to block detection by a type of immune cell called a natural killer cell (NK cell) .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318111319.ht


NEWS - Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight
A group of deaf adults using American Sign Language in a healthy lifestyle program successfully lost weight, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014 .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-taught-american-langua


NEWS - Researchers find a lobster's sense of smell may hold the key to better electronic sensors
(Medical Xpress)—Could lobsters help protect soldiers someday? A team of University of Florida researchers says they might .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-lobster-key-electronic


NEWS - Small step towards growing tissue in the lab
(Phys.org) —University of Adelaide mathematicians have devised a method for identifying how cell clusters have formed by analyzing an image of the cluster .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-03-small-tissue-lab.htm


NEWS - Studies advance potential use of MRI magnetic fields to treat balance disorders
Expanding on earlier research, Johns Hopkins researchers report that people with balance disorders or dizziness traceable to an inner-ear disturbance show distinctive abnormal eye movements when the affected ear is exposed to the strong pull of an MRI's magnetic field .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-advance-potential-mri-


NEWS - Vaccination: No-refrigeration, spray vaccine could curb diseases in remote areas
A new kind of single-dose vaccine that comes in a nasal spray and doesn’t require refrigeration could dramatically alter the public health landscape -- get more people vaccinated around the world and address the looming threats of emerging and re-emerging diseases .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140319103317.ht


NEWS-CANCER - Inflammation mobilizes tumor cells
Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich researchers have discovered a novel feedback mechanism that provides a mechanistic link between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-inflammation-mobilizes


NEWS-CANCER - New Stool Test Shows Promise as Colon Cancer Screen
DNA analysis boosts accuracy rate to more than 90 percent, researchers sa .. ...
Cervical cancer screenings recommended more often
http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/news/20140319/new-sto


NEWS-CANCER - Team studies obinutuzumab for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Two North Shore-LIJ Cancer Institute doctors, world-renowned for their research in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), weigh in on a German study of a new drug therapy for CLL in the March 20 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, the North Shore-LIJ Health System announced today .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-team-obinutuzumab-chro


NEWS-CANCER - Where are we with breast cancer in 2013?
The global burden of breast cancer remains immense in 2013, with over 1.6 million new cases being diagnosed annually. This burden has been increasing at a rate of 3.1% per year, and while the majority of new cases are diagnosed among women in developed countries, the 450,000 deaths per year from the disease are now equally divided between the developing and developed world, the 9th European Breast Cancer conference (EBCC-9) will hear tomorrow .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-breast-cancer.htm


PSYCHOLOGY - Hug more, scold less: Strict parenting linked to child obesity
Moms and dads whose favorite phrase is, “because I said so,” may want to rethink their parenting style. A new study shows that authoritarian parents are more likely to have obese kids than those who take the time to explain rules.    .. ...
http://www.today.com/health/hug-more-scold-less-strict-paren


PSYCHOLOGY - Is Beauty in the Eye of the Beholder?
The adage that beauty is in the eye of the beholder posits a subjective interpretation of physical attractiveness. Yet there is strong consensus between observers as to which individuals are beautiful. To what extent are evaluations of beauty agreed-upon within and across cultures? And insofar as there is general agreement in rating beauty, what explains this consensus?read mor .. ...
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/it-s-man-s-and-woman-s-w


PSYCHOLOGY - Out of mind, out of sight: Suppressing unwanted memories reduces their unconscious influence on behaviour
(Medical Xpress)—New research shows that, contrary to what was previously assumed, suppressing unwanted memories reduces their influence on behaviour, and sheds light on how this process happens in the brain .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-suppressing-unwanted-m


PSYCHOLOGY - Social groups alleviate depression
Building a strong connection to a social group helps clinically depressed patients recover and helps prevent relapse, according to a new study .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-social-groups-alleviat


SLEEP - Researchers show how lost sleep leads to lost neurons
Most people appreciate that not getting enough sleep impairs cognitive performance. For the chronically sleep-deprived such as shift workers, students, or truckers, a common strategy is simply to catch up on missed slumber on the weekends. According to common wisdom, catch up sleep repays one's "sleep debt," with no lasting effects. But a new Penn Medicine study shows disturbing evidence that chronic sleep loss may be more serious than previously ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-lost-neurons.htm


WATERS - Global food trade can alleviate water scarcity
International trade of food crops led to freshwater savings worth 2.4 billion US-Dollars in 2005 and had a major impact on local water stress. Trading food involves the trade of virtually embedded water used for production, and the amount of that water depends heavily on the climatic conditions in the production region: It takes, for instance, 2.700 liters of water to produce 1 kilo of cereals in Morocco, while the same kilo produced in Germany u ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318140531.ht


WATERS - Photo: The delicate details of a sea shell
This pretty shell was photographed at Burying Hill Beach in Westport, Connecticut .. ...
http://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/natural-sciences/photo-


WEIGHT - A diet to make you fat or fit? The role of 'sumo stew' in shaping a sumo wrestler
A recent study explores the meanings of ‘fat’ and obesity in sumo and Japanese culture and the part that chanko, or ‘sumo stew’, plays in this .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140319093940.ht


WEIGHT - Lose weight sooner with the climate change diet
Two options ensure weight loss: eat less or exercise more. According to a new study, we may be eating less sooner than we think .. ...
http://www.treehugger.com/climate-change/lose-weight-sooner-