HEALTH PORTATION curated News March 30th

BRAIN - Study pinpoints why we miss subtle visual changes, and why it keeps us sane
Ever notice how Harry Potter's T-shirt abruptly changes from a crewneck to a henley shirt in "The Order of the Phoenix," or how in "Pretty Woman," Julia Roberts' croissant inexplicably morphs into a pancake? Don't worry if you missed those continuity bloopers. Vision scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have discovered an upside to the brain mechanism that can blind us to subtle chang ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-subtle-visual-sane.htm


BRAIN - Working Memory and The Movies Streaming In Our Heads
Peter Carruthers began his career studying philosophy as an undergraduate at the University of Leeds, an outpost for Wittgenstein scholarship.-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com .. ...
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/talking-back/2014/03/29/


CHOLESTEROL - Alternative treatment for cholesterol shows promise
An experimental treatment has shown promise in lowering bad cholesterol, offering hope for people at risk of heart disease but who cannot tolerate drugs known as statins, researchers said Sunday .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-alternative-treatment-


DIABETES - Medication does not reduce risk of recurrent CV events among patients with diabetes
Use of the drug aleglitazar, which has shown the ability to lower glucose levels and have favorable effects on cholesterol, did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke among patients with type 2 diabetes and recent heart attack or unstable angina, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with presentation at the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-medication-recurrent-c


FOODS - Scientists offer 'best practices' nutrition measurement for researchers
At first glance, measuring what the common fruit fly eats might seem like a trivial matter, but it is absolutely critical when it comes to conducting studies of aging, health, metabolism and disease. How researchers measure consumption can make all the difference in the accuracy of a study's conclusions .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-03-scientists-nutrition.htm


HEART - Astronauts' hearts become more spherical in space
New findings from a study of 12 astronauts show the heart becomes more spherical when exposed to long periods of microgravity in space, a change that could lead to cardiac problems, according to research. With implications for an eventual manned mission to Mars, the findings represent an important step toward understanding how a spaceflight of 18 months or more could affect astronauts' heart health .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140329175106.ht


HEART - Celiac disease linked to increased risk of coronary artery disease
People with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research. The study is the first to look at the association between celiac disease and coronary artery disease and adds to the evolving understanding of how systemic inflammation and autoimmune processes might influence cardiovascular disease development. Data also showed a slightly higher risk of stroke ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140329175102.ht


HEART - Commonly used intra-aortic balloon pump may have broader potential for heart patients
One of many uses for the intra-aortic balloon pump is helping ensure adequate oxygen and blood delivery to a heart struggling to resume beating in the aftermath of coronary bypass surgery. However, the most frequently used mechanical circulatory assist device in the world may have untapped potential, physicians say .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140329175129.ht


HEART - Daylight saving impacts timing of heart attacks
Still feeling the residual effects of springing ahead for daylight saving time? The hour of sleep lost -- or gained -- may play a bigger, perhaps more dangerous role in our body's natural rhythm than we think. It seems moving the clock forward or backward may alter the timing of when heart attacks occur in the week following these time changes, according to research .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140329175108.ht


HEART - Emma Watson criticises 'dangerously unhealthy' pressure on young women
Harry Potter actor also describes trying to integrate at Brown University in the US, followed by British photographer .. ...
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/mar/30/emma-watson-pres
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/20

HEART - Genetic markers may predict when people with heart disease are likely to have a heart attack
Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified a biological process that may help physicians predict when someone with heart disease is likely to have a heart attack in the near future .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-genetic-markers-people


HEART - Relaxed blood pressure guidelines cut millions from needing medication
New guidelines that ease the recommended blood pressure could result in 5.8 million U.S. adults no longer needing hypertension medication, according to an analysis. The findings are the first peer-reviewed analysis to quantify the impact of guidelines' change to relax the blood pressure goal in adults 60 years and older to 150/90, instead of the previous goal of 140/90 .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140329175017.ht


HEART - Researchers identify new protein markers that may improve understanding of heart disease
Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah, have discovered that elevated levels of two recently identified proteins in the body are inflammatory markers and indicators of the presence of cardiovascular disease .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-protein-markers-heart-


HEART - Study compares heart valve systems
Among patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using a catheter tube, a comparison of two types of heart valve technologies, balloon-expandable or self-expandable valve systems, found a greater rate of device success with the balloon-expandable valve, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with presentation at the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-heart-valve.htm


HEART - Test Accurately Rules out Heart Attacks in the ER
Blood test helps rule out heart attack in people who go to the ER with chest pain, study find .. ...
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/test-accurately-rules


NEWS - Amazing Underwater Wheelchair Photos Challenge Us To Redefine 'Disability'
This artist's wheelchair didn't limit her -- instead, it freed her.British artist Susan Austin uses her innovative underwater wheelchair to create stunning visual art and to also challenge us to rethink the way we see people with disabilities.With photos, videos and performance art pieces involving her unique underwater wheelchair named "Portal," Austin strives to redefine the way we relate to people in wheelchairs. Austin works to fight back aga ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/30/sue-austin-photos_n
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1705891/thumbs/s-SUE-AUSTIN-mini.j

NEWS - Children's hyperactivity 'is not a real disease', says US expert
Neuroscientist says children are being 'labelled' as having ADHD when there could be other reasons for their disorde .. ...
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/mar/30/children-hype
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/20

NEWS - Experts create intelligent 'plaster' to monitor patients
Medical engineers said Sunday they had created a device the size of a plaster which can monitor patients by tracking their muscle activity before administering their medication .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-03-experts-intelligent-plaster-pat


NEWS - Huntington's disease: Study discovers potassium boost improves walking in mouse model
Tweaking a specific cell type's ability to absorb potassium in the brain improved walking and prolonged survival in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, reports a UCLA study published March 30 in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience. The discovery could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-03-huntington-disease-pot


NEWS - New approach to leukemia testing may better define prognosis, treatment
Nearly half of patients with the most common form of adult leukemia are said to have normal chromosomes but appear instead to have a distinct pattern of genetic abnormalities that could better define their prognosis and treatment, researchers report. In new work using microarray technology that probes millions of genes within chromosomes, researchers found the unique pattern in the leukemia cells of 22 patients diagnosed with cytogenetically norm ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140329175116.ht


NEWS - Researchers reverse a liver disorder in mice by correcting a mutated gene
Using a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder caused by a single genetic mutation .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-03-reverse-liver-disorder-mice-mut


NEWS - Scientists offer 'best practices' nutrition measurement for researchers
At first glance, measuring what the common fruit fly eats might seem like a trivial matter, but it is absolutely critical when it comes to conducting studies of aging, health, metabolism and disease. How researchers measure consumption can make all the difference in the accuracy of a study's conclusions .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-03-scientists-nutrition.htm


NEWS - Top 7 Ingredients to Avoid in Deodorant
Is Your Deodorant Toxic? Deodorants are an essential element for many. You can find it in almost everybody’s bathroom, but do you know what the ingredients are and if they are toxic? Many are unaware of the toxins present in deodorants and their dangerous effects on our body, and continue to use them to get […]The post Top 7 Ingredients to Avoid in Deodorant appeared first on PositiveMed .. ...
http://positivemed.com/2014/03/30/top-7-ingredients-avoid-de


NEWS - Whale carcass 'cure' for rheumatism
Climbing inside a whale was once thought to bring relief to rheumatism sufferers, an exhibit at the Australian National Maritime Museum reveals .. ...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-26807485#sa-ns_


PSYCHOLOGY - How to handle an insecure romantic partner
Having a partner with an anxious or avoidant attachment style can make for an unhappy and unstable relationship. But a recent article in Current Directions in Psychological Science suggests that there may be hope, if you match your style of social support to your partner’s attachment style. And frequent sex might also help.read mor .. ...
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/sex-murder-and-the-meani


PSYCHOLOGY - Why do we grieve for dead celebrities?
L'Wren Scott, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Winehouse Why do we grieve when we hear about the death of someone famous? We didn't know them, so why does it hurt .. ...
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/28/why-grie
Enclosure: image/jpeg http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/20