HEALTH PORTATION curated News April 7th

ALZHEIMER - Alzheimer's disease may be more prevalent and manifests itself differently among African-Americans
A new study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center reviews research that suggests that the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease among older African Americans may be two to three times greater than in the non-Hispanic white population and that they differ from the non-Hispanic white population in risk factors and disease manifestation. The study results will be published in the April 7 issue of Health Affairs .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-04-alzheimer-disease-prev


ALZHEIMER - Caffeine against Alzheimer's disease? Positive effect on tau deposits demonstrated
Caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease, researchers have demonstrated for the first time. Tau deposits, along with beta-amyloid plaques, are among the characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease. These protein deposits disrupt the communication of the nerve cells in the brain and contribute to their degeneration. Despite intensive research there is no drug available that can prevent this detrimental process .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090533.ht


BRAIN - Green tea extract boosts your brain power, especially the working memory, new research shows
Green tea is said to have many putative positive effects on health. Now, researchers are reporting first evidence that green tea extract enhances the cognitive functions, in particular the working memory. The findings suggest promising clinical implications for the treatment of cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders such as dementia .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407101545.ht


BRAIN - Key cells in touch sensation identified: Skin cells use new molecule to send touch information to the brain
Biologists have solved an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures. Touch is the last frontier of sensory neuroscience. The cells and molecules that initiate vision -- rod and cone cells and light-sensitive receptors -- have been known since the early 20th century, and the senses of smell, taste, and hearing are increasingly understood. But almost nothing is known about the cell ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140406162249.ht


BRAIN - New research suggests connection between white matter and cognitive health
A multidisciplinary group of scientists from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have identified an interesting connection between the health of the brain tissue that supports cognitive functioning and the presence of dementia in adults with Down syndrome .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-04-white-cognitive-health


BRAIN - Switching off anxiety with light: Cone opsins coupled with serotonin receptors
Receptors for the messenger molecule serotonin can be modified in such a way that they can be activated by light, a study shows. An imbalance in serotonin levels seems to cause anxiety and depression. The researchers have provided a new model system for investigating the mechanism underlying these dysfunctions in cell cultures as well as living organisms .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090411.ht


BRAIN - The social circuits that track how we like people and ideas
Whether at the office, dorm, PTA meeting, or any other social setting, we all know intuitively who the popular people are – who is most liked – even if we can't always put our finger on why. That information is often critical to professional or social success as you navigate your social networks. Yet until now, scientists have not understood how our brains recognize these popular people. In new work, researchers say that we track people's popular ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-04-social-circuits-track-


DIABETES - New ammunition in the fight against type 2 diabetes
Gastric banding can play a vital role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes in people who are overweight and not obese, according to new research .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-04-ammunition-diabetes.ht


EXERCISE - Sitting Too Much May Harm Health
New studies add more weight to earlier research suggesting that too much sitting is bad -- even if you get regular exercise. Learn more at WebMD .. ...
http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/news/20140407/sitting-


FOODS - 8 surprising ingredients you should add to your shopping list
Quinoa'd out? Get ready for some new ingredient crushes: These 8 under-the-radar foods are versatile, loaded with flavor, and (bonus!) full of nutrients .. ...
http://www.today.com/food/8-surprising-ingredients-you-shoul


FOODS - DNews: Salt Isn't Really That Bad For You
We've been told that our salt intake is dangerously high. While the Centers for Disease Control back this statement, is it true? Tara Long joins DNews to look at an interesting new study saying that Americans' salt intake is fine .. ...
http://news.discovery.com/human/health/salt-isnt-really-that


FOODS - Food quality will suffer with rising carbon dioxide, field study shows
Climate change is hitting home -- in the pantry, this time. A field study of wheat demonstrates how the nutritional quality of food crops can be diminished when elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide interfere with a plant's ability to process nitrate into proteins. "Several explanations for this decline have been put forward, but this is the first study to demonstrate that elevated carbon dioxide inhibits the conversion of nitrate into pr ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140406162420.ht


FOODS - Internet lords keep .wine bottled for now
Internet overseers are keeping .WINE and .VIN online addresses bottled in the hope a few months of aging will make them more palatable .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-04-internet-lords-wine-bottled.htm


FOODS - Who decides what food additives are “Generally Recognized as Safe”?
A report from the Natural Resources Defense Council gives us even more reason than even to avoid processed foods .. ...
http://www.treehugger.com/health/who-decides-what-food-addit


HEART - Energizing sick mitochondria with vitamin B3: Effective treatment for mitochondrial disease
Vitamin B3 form nicotinamide riboside can slow down the progression of mitochondrial disease, suggesting its potential as a novel therapy approach to adult-onset mitochondrial muscle diseases, new research suggests. Vitamins B have recently been turned out to be potent modifiers of energy metabolism, especially the function of mitochondria. Vitamin B3, (niacin) has been found to delay the signs of aging in animal models .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090403.ht


HERBS - 4 Benefits of chamomile
Chamomile is one of the oldest and most popular medicinal herbs, but it has also become one of the best studied .. ...
http://www.treehugger.com/health/4-benefits-chamomile.htm


IMMUNE-SYSTEM - New light shed on key bacterial immune system
New insights into a surprisingly flexible immune system present in bacteria for combating viruses and other foreign DNA invaders have been revealed by researchers from New Zealand's University of Otago and the Netherlands .. ...
http://phys.org/news/2014-04-key-bacterial-immune.htm


NEWS - Amino acid fingerprints revealed in new study
A major step has been taken toward the sequencing of proteins, demonstrating the accurate identification of amino acids, by briefly pinning each in a narrow junction between a pair of flanking electrodes and measuring a characteristic chain of current spikes passing through successive amino acid molecules .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140406162416.ht


NEWS - Bleach vs. bacteria: Development of new drugs to breach microbial defenses
Chlorine bleach has been used as a disinfectant for hundreds of years, but our bodies have been using its active component to help kill invading bacteria for millennia. Details about how bleach kills -- and how bacteria can survive the attack -- may lead to the development of new drugs .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090214.ht


NEWS - Fatty acid composition in blood reflects quality of dietary carbohydrates in children
Fatty acid composition in blood is not only a biomarker for the quality of dietary fat, but also reflects the quality of dietary carbohydrates, new research shows. This study showed that a higher consumption of candy and a lower consumption of high-fibre grain products were associated with a higher proportion of oleic acid in blood .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407101537.ht


NEWS - U.S. school children exposed to arsenic in well water have lower IQ scores
A study from three school districts in Maine exposed to arsenic in drinking water experienced declines in child intelligence. While earlier studies conducted by the researchers in South Asia, and Bangladesh in particular, showed that exposure to arsenic in drinking water is negatively associated with child intelligence, this is the first study to examine intelligence against individual water arsenic exposures in the U.S .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407101714.ht


NEWS-CANCER - Renal cancer cells thrive when put in right environment, supported by specific enzyme
Tumor cells are picky about where they live. In the wrong environment, they fail to reach their potential. But put those same cells on the right bit of real estate, and they grow like mad. Researchers found renal cancer cells planted in a supportive environment proliferate with the help of an enzyme usually only seen in the brain .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140406162457.ht


NEWS-CANCER - Role of magnetic nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment
While exploring the promise of magnetic nanoparticle (mNP) hyperthermia in breast cancer treatment, a researcher reviews preclinical studies and discusses plans for early-phase clinical studies in humans. This evolving treatment approach involves the injection of nanoparticles into the tumor, which are then activated with magnetic energy. Once activated the nanoparticles produce heat inside the cancer cell. The heat kills the cancer cell with min ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090226.ht


PSYCHOLOGY - How to Handle Difficult People – A Tao Perspective
Tao, the ancient Chinese concept of “the way,” can be interpreted as harnessing and flowing with your life force (“Chi”) so you experience composure and equanimity within, while projecting supple and effective strength without.read mor .. ...
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/communication-success/20


PSYCHOLOGY - Procrastination and impulsivity genetically linked: Exploring the genetics of 'I'll do it tomorrow'
Procrastination and impulsivity are genetically linked, suggesting that the two traits stem from similar evolutionary origins, according to new research. The research indicates that the traits are related to our ability to successfully pursue and juggle goals .. ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407101718.ht


PSYCHOLOGY - The Origins of Laughter
Laughing signals play for primates, but there is something unique about human laughter. It is up to us what we see as play. Can you play life well?read mor .. ...
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/unified-theory-happiness


VITAMINS - Vitamin D supplementation may be beneficial in depression
(HealthDay)—Vitamin D supplementation has no overall effect on depressive symptoms, but may have a significant effect for those with clinically significant depression, according to a review published online March 14 in Psychosomatic Medicine .. ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-04-vitamin-d-supplementat


WATERS - Project will Build the World’s Largest OTEC Plant – Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion
BALTIMORE, Oct. 2013 – Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] and Reignwood Group have signed a contract to start design of a 10-megawatt Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant, which, when complete, will be the largest OTEC project to date. Lockheed Martin is the industry leader in the development of OTEC technology, holding 19 related patents... .. ...
ocean thermal energy conversion map from Lockheed Martin
http://solarthermalmagazine.com/2014/04/06/project-will-buil


WATERS - Scotland to Build Europe’s Largest Tidal Energy Project in Pentland Firth
Scotland plans to build Europe’s largest tidal energy project in the Pentland Firth, between Orkney and the Scottish mainland. According to Reuters, MeyGen Limited, a joint venture between investment bank Morgan Stanley, utility International Power and tidal technology firm Atlantis Resources Corporation, will install the 86-megawatt (MW) tidal array in stages, starting with a 9.. .. ...
http://solarthermalmagazine.com/2014/04/07/scotland-to-build


WEIGHT - Mortality risks of being overweight or obese are underestimated
Many obesity studies substantially underestimate the mortality risks associated with excess weight in the United States, new research indicates. Normal weight is indicated by a BMI of 18.5-24.9 kg/m2, overweight is indicated by a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2, obese class 1 is a BMI of 30.0-34.9 kg/m2 and obese class 2 is a BMI of 35.0 kg/m2 and above. Skeptics of the meta-analysis argue that the findings are likely driven by biases, especially by illne ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407143719.ht


WEIGHT - The Truth About Belly Fat
Do you have too much belly fat? Changing that may be as simple as diet, exercise, sleep, and stress management. WebMD shares what works .. ...
Woman squeezing belly into pants
http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/the-truth-about-belly-fat